What We Are Reading Today: ‘It Ends with Us’

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Updated 05 July 2022

What We Are Reading Today: ‘It Ends with Us’

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“It Ends with Us” is an emotionally stirring romance novel written by Colleen Hoover.

The book’s central theme revolves around love and pain and includes a series of letters written by the main character, Lily. Each letter is in chronological order and represents a journal entry about her emotional state and circumstances.

Lily is a strong and successful young woman from a small town who worked hard to get into college and own a business. She falls in love quickly with handsome neurosurgeon Ryle Kincaid, a confident and intelligent man.

And for a while, she thinks her life could not be more perfect until she discovers that love is not as simple as it seems.

Kincaid turns out to be dangerous, and when Lily bumps into her first love Atlas Corrigan, a kindred spirit, she becomes conflicted.

Inspired by true events of her childhood, the novel reflects the relationship Hoover had with her parents, and she describes it as “one of the hardest books I’ve ever written.”

Readers are put through the emotional rollercoaster of the love triangle and Lily’s battle with her emotions as she attempts to comprehend the situation.

Hoover humanizes both the antagonist and protagonist, painfully portraying how difficult such a situation can be.

The novel was released in 2016, and was this week ranked as fourth on Amazon’s top 20 most sold and read books of the week.

Hoover is an accomplished author of romance and young adult fiction novels. She self-published her first novel “Slammed” in 2012, and “Hopeless” topped The New York Times bestseller list after being published in December 2012. Her works were originally self-published prior to being released by a publishing house.


New Lonely Planet guide shines a light on Britain’s hidden Muslim heritage

New Lonely Planet guide shines a light on Britain’s hidden Muslim heritage
Updated 01 October 2022

New Lonely Planet guide shines a light on Britain’s hidden Muslim heritage

New Lonely Planet guide shines a light on Britain’s hidden Muslim heritage
  • ‘Experience Great Britain’ is part of publisher’s range of ‘anti-guidebooks’
  • It offers ‘really diverse experiences for visitors,’ contributor Tharik Hussain says

LONDON: A new Lonely Planet guide to Great Britain features an entire chapter on the country’s little-known Islamic heritage, which stretches back more than 1,200 years.

Published this month, “Experience Great Britain” is part of the publisher’s range of “anti-guidebooks,” so-called because of the unique local perspectives they offer travelers.

The guide to Britain has sections and essays titled “Legacies of Empire,” “Bristol’s Black History,” “An Other London” and “Hidden Muslim Britain,” all of which seek to shine a light on the nation’s marginalized cultures and their stories.

Tharik Hussain, the Muslim author of “Minarets in the Mountains: A Journey Into Muslim Europe,” which explores the continent’s indigenous Muslim cultures, contributed to the new travel guide.

 

 

“I think it is wonderful to see mainstream guidebooks like this finally going out of their way to include such really diverse experiences for visitors,” he said.

“So often, writers like me are brought onto such projects to tick a box and create the impression there are diverse perspectives in it, but actually we’re often asked to just write about the same things covered by the previous writers. What’s diverse about that?

“To achieve truly diverse perspectives commissioning editors must select writers from different backgrounds and then be brave and empower writers to come back with what they find interesting, even if that goes against the editor’s expectations.”

Hussain, who developed one of the UK’s first Muslim heritage trails, wrote the “Hidden Muslim Britain” chapter, which focuses on Woking — home to the UK’s first purpose-built mosque, the Shah Jahan — Liverpool and Brighton, where some of the country’s most visible Islamic legacies can be found.

These include Britain’s first Muslim cemetery — the final resting place of convert lords, ladies and Muslim royalty — and Brighton Pavilion, where injured Muslim (as well as Sikh and Hindu) soldiers fighting for Britain in World War I were treated.

The guide also tells of cultural institutes set up by the Turkish, Palestinian, Bangladeshi and Black communities in London. (Supplied/Tharik Hussain)

“The guide also reveals where to visit spectacular ‘oriental rooms’ modeled on famous Muslim palaces like the Alhambra in Spain and the Topkapi in Turkey,” Hussain said.

“This is supported by an essay called Anglo Islam that reveals how Islam came to the island as early as the 8th century, when an Anglo-Saxon king called Offa minted a gold coin featuring part of the Muslim declaration of faith in Arabic.”

The essay also tells of how Britain’s first real Muslim community “were a group of white, convert Victorians who worshipped at the country’s first mosque in Liverpool, founded by a solicitor called Henry William Quilliam, later Abdullah Quilliam,” he added.

The section on empire tells visitors where they can go to learn about “the horrors of British imperial rule,” and how to experience more positive post-colonial legacies like the stunning Neasden Temple in northwest London, built by immigrants who moved to Britain after the collapse of the empire, Hussain said.

The guide also tells of the cultural institutes set up by the Turkish, Palestinian, Bangladeshi and Black communities in London, like the Black Cultural Archives in Brixton, and offers alternatives to the usual tourist attractions, such as the Muslim History Tours and the Open City walking tours that explore London’s forgotten Chinese heritage.


What We Are Reading Today: Can’t Hurt Me

What We Are Reading Today: Can’t Hurt Me
Updated 30 September 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Can’t Hurt Me

What We Are Reading Today: Can’t Hurt Me

Author: David Goggins

In Can’t Hurt Me, David Goggins shares how he transformed himself from a depressed, overweight young man with no future into a US Armed Forces icon and one of the world’s top endurance athletes.

Goggins reveals that most of us tap into only 40 percent of our capabilities which he calls The 40% Rule, and his story illuminates a path that anyone can follow to push past pain, demolish fear, and reach their full potential.


What We Are Reading Today: American Psychosis

What We Are Reading Today: American Psychosis
Updated 29 September 2022

What We Are Reading Today: American Psychosis

What We Are Reading Today: American Psychosis

Author: David Corn

David Corn’s American Psychosis is a fast-paced, rollicking, behind-the-scenes account of how the Republican Party since the 1950s has encouraged and exploited extremism, bigotry, and paranoia to gain power, offering readers a brisk journey through the netherworld of far-right irrationality and the party’s interactions with the darkest forces in America.

Corn reveals the hidden history of how the party forged alliances with extremists, kooks, racists, and conspiracy-mongers and fostered fear, anger, and resentment to win elections — and how this led to Donald Trump’s triumph and the transformation of the party into a Trump personality cult.


What We Are Reading Today: Paths of Dissent

What We Are Reading Today: Paths of Dissent
Updated 27 September 2022

What We Are Reading Today: Paths of Dissent

What We Are Reading Today: Paths of Dissent

Authors: Andrew Bacevich and Daniel A. Sjursen

Paths of Dissent collects fifteen original essays from American veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan deployments who have come out in opposition to these conflicts.

These soldiers vividly describe both their motivations for serving and the disillusionment that made them speak out against the system.

Their testimony is crucial for understanding just how the world’s self-proclaimed greatest military power went so badly astray.


What We Are Reading Today: The Blame Game

Cover of the book of (The blame Game). (Supplied)
Cover of the book of (The blame Game). (Supplied)
Updated 27 September 2022

What We Are Reading Today: The Blame Game

Cover of the book of (The blame Game). (Supplied)
  • The book also deals with the subject of the Russian-Ukrainian war, its impact on oil prices, and how Saudi Arabia has been working to steady the oil market while refusing to use it as an economic weapon or pressure card

Author: Dr. Mohammad Al-Sabban

Dr. Mohammad Al-Sabban’s book “The Blame Game” shares exclusive information on what he describes as the web of lies he encountered and fought against over three decades heading Saudi Arabia’s team of negotiators at climate-change talks.

He led the Kingdom’s delegation during key decision-making sessions of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

While world leaders accepted that global warming was taking place and that the issue required swift and comprehensive action to tackle it, Al-Sabban reveals the darker secrets that have lurked behind the scenes of UN-sponsored meetings on climate change.

He exposes what he claims to be the direct and hidden fingerprints of developed industrial nations showing their involvement in atrocities against the environment over the past two centuries, while uncovering agenda-driven agreements and campaigns.

The book also deals with the subject of the Russian-Ukrainian war, its impact on oil prices, and how Saudi Arabia has been working to steady the oil market while refusing to use it as an economic weapon or pressure card.

“The Blame Game” tells how industrial nations often place more priority on oil and gas supply chains rather than creating a pollution-free environment.