British Muslim MP accuses Labour Party of harassment

British Muslim MP accuses Labour Party of harassment
Begum announced in June that she had been signed off sick from work as a result of what she described as a “sustained campaign of misogynistic abuse.” (Social media)
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Updated 29 September 2022

British Muslim MP accuses Labour Party of harassment

British Muslim MP accuses Labour Party of harassment
  • Apsana Begum said: ‘I have never been given a fair chance. The level of inhumanity towards me has been chilling’
  • She said she received no support from the party when local officials organized a vote on her right to stand at the next election

Apsana Begum, an MP for the Labour party in the UK, has accused the party of harassment and targeting her because she is a “socialist, Muslim, working-class woman,” the Guardian reported.

Begum announced in June that she had been signed off sick from work as a result of what she described as a “sustained campaign of misogynistic abuse.”

Members of Begum’s constituency party voted to initiate a “trigger ballot,” a mechanism through which local branches and affiliated groups decide whether a sitting MP should be allowed to stand again at the next general election unimpeded or need to go through a re-selection process.

The Poplar and Limehouse MP said she received no support from the Labour Party as she faced the vote on her deselection.

During an appearance at the World Transformed festival at the Labour conference in Liverpool, Begum said she experienced “factionalism and racism” within the party. “I have never been given a fair chance. The level of inhumanity towards me has been chilling,” she added.

Regarding her party’s decision to proceed with the trigger ballot even though she was on sick leave, Begum said: “I can’t think of any circumstance where it would be acceptable but particularly a party which is supposed to be a party of labour.”

According to the Guardian, Labour previously stated that Begum is subject to the same rules as all MPs and that the threshold for triggering a new selection process was significantly increased by rule changes championed by Keir Starmer last year. As a result, Begum will automatically be included on the shortlist.

However, the party’s headquarters reportedly has received complaints about disruption, intimidation and harassment targeting women. Begum said had to go to hospital in June as a result of mental health issues and was subsequently signed off on sick leave. She announced this month that she planned to return to work gradually.

“I have faced a relentless and sustained campaign of abuse and harassment, which has even included vexatious litigation seeking to send me to jail,” she said in a return to work statement.

“As the chair of the APPG (All-Party Parliamentary Group) on domestic abuse and violence, I believe that the Labour party has shown a lack of understanding regarding tackling domestic abuse, including post-separation harassment,” she said

Begum said she wrote to Labour’s general secretary, David Evans, to say she is “seeking advice and considering taking legal action”.

Begum’s previous allegations of domestic abuse emerged last year when she was acquitted of fraud for allegedly withholding information about her personal circumstances to obtain social housing, according to the Guardian.

Tower Hamlets council claimed she had failed to disclose that she had moved in with her partner. The MP said she had notified authorities for council tax purposes, she was going through a difficult time personally because of family issues, and that a “controlling and coercive” partner, Ehtashamul Haque, had taken control of her affairs. He denies this.


Travel sector emissions nearly 3% lower than reported: WTTC research

Travel sector emissions nearly 3% lower than reported: WTTC research
Updated 13 min 21 sec ago

Travel sector emissions nearly 3% lower than reported: WTTC research

Travel sector emissions nearly 3% lower than reported: WTTC research

Riyadh: Greenhouse gas emissions from the tourism sector were lower than previously thought in the run up to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new data published by the World Travel and Tourism Council.

The research shows that in 2019 the sector’s greenhouse gas emissions totaled 8.1 percent globally — below an earlier estimate of 11 percent.

The findings mean that while between 2010 and 2019 the sector’s gross domestic product grew on average 4.3 percent annually, its environmental footprint only increased by 2.4 percent.

The WTTC’s research, the first of its kind, covers 185 countries and will be updated annually.

Julia Simpson, president and CEO of the WTTC, said: “8.1 percent is the stake in the ground. The key is to become more efficient and decoupling the rate at which we grow from the amount of energy we consume. From today, every decision, every change, will lead to a better and brighter future for all.”

The broader Environmental and Social Research will include measures of the sector’s impact against a range of indicators, including pollutants, energy sources, water use, as well as social data, including age, wage and gender profiles of travel and tourism related employment, the statement said.

WTTC will continue to release data on how the sector fares against these indicators throughout 2023.

The data comes in the same week as the World Travel and Tourism Global Summit in Riyadh.

Simpson used her speech at the event to allude to the research, stating that it was the largest such project ever undertaken by the Council.

“Until now we did not have a sector-wide way to accurately measure our climate footprint. This data will give governments the detailed information they need to make progress against the Paris Agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals," she said.

“Travel and tourism is making huge strides to decarbonize, but governments must set the framework. We need a steely focus on increasing the production of sustainable aviation fuels with government incentives,” Simpson went on, adding: “The technology exists. We also need greater use of renewable energy in our national grids – so when we turn on a light in a hotel room, it is using a sustainable energy source.”

Saudi Minister of Tourism Ahmed Al-Khateeb welcomed the research, and said: “We are proud to be a partner to the WTTC in this important research that will monitor impact for the future. Saudi Arabia recognizes that travelers and investors want policies that promote sustainability in the industry and we have embarked on a journey that will make the Kingdom a pioneer in sustainable tourism."

“Under the Saudi Green Initiative, we launched more than 60 initiatives in the past year to do just that. The first wave of initiatives represent more than $186 billion of investment in the green economy.”


On remote Bangladeshi island, Rohingya refugee children find healing in art

On remote Bangladeshi island, Rohingya refugee children find healing in art
Updated 13 min 43 sec ago

On remote Bangladeshi island, Rohingya refugee children find healing in art

On remote Bangladeshi island, Rohingya refugee children find healing in art
  • Bangladeshi cartoonist Syed Rashad Imam Tanmoy engaged refugees in drawing mural
  • He asked kids in Bhasan Char to picture their lives, fears, dreams

DHAKA: When Sona Maher’s family escaped a military crackdown in Myanmar, they arrived in Bangladesh with nothing but the clothes they were wearing, and the images of blood and destruction she is still trying to forget.

The 14-year-old is one of more than 1 million Muslim Rohingya who in 2017 fled persecution, rape, and death at the hands of the Myanmar army.

Most of them found safety in neighboring Bangladesh, of which a southeastern part has since become the world’s largest refugee settlement.

Initially settled in the squalid camps of Cox’s Bazar, Meher’s family last year joined a group of nearly 30,000 Rohingya who Bangladeshi authorities have relocated to Bhasan Char, a remote island in the Bay of Bengal.

Before and when the relocation started, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and rights groups criticized the project on the grounds of safety and Bhasan Char’s livability, as it is prone to severe weather and flooding. But it is also where Maher and other children found solace — in art.

“I witnessed the atrocities by the Myanmar military in my neighborhood in Rakhine. Houses were burnt down, people were killed brutally all around me,” she told Arab News.

“I remember those horrific days and sometimes try to show those incidents in my drawings. I forget the pain when I see the colors of my drawings. It inspires me to hope for a new life, new dreams. I want to get rid of those horrible memories. Life is better now.”

Maher took part in an art project run by Bangladeshi cartoonist Syed Rashad Imam Tanmoy and the UNHCR, and art education NGO Artolution, who asked Rohingya children to picture their lives, fears, and dreams in a huge wall painting.

It took eight days, 50 participants, and long hours of consultation to complete the 50-meter-long mural last month.

“It was not just another pretty picture on the wall. We wanted to offer mental healing through art therapy with the engagement of the community,” Tanmoy told Arab News.

“Initially we experienced some reluctance … At this point, we started the paintings with brushes and colors. A few Rohingyas came forward to watch the process.”

Soon, they too began to paint.

A dominant motif appearing in their drawings was a boat.

“Most of the Rohingyas came up with the idea of drawing boats,” Tanmoy said. “They hold their dreams of returning to their homeland, and of a journey toward a better future.”

For those who participated in the project, such as 17-year-old Anowar Sadek, expressing themselves through art came with some sense of solace.

“Whenever I hold the painting materials, it helps me forget the agonies I witnessed earlier in Rakhine,” he said. “The paintings give me much comfort and pleasure.”

But both the children and art educators know that the comfort will be only temporary as long as they remain without a place that they can call home. And isolation in Bhasan Char also adds to their distress.

“My heart filled with joy when I painted the wall with colors … I want to continue painting throughout my life,” Roksana Akter, a 12-year-old who joined the mural project, said.

“But I have many friends and relatives in Cox’s Bazar. I didn’t see them for a long time. It’s the saddest part of my life at this moment.”


Air raid warning issued over all Ukraine – Ukrainian officials

Air raid warning issued over all Ukraine – Ukrainian officials
Updated 15 min 17 sec ago

Air raid warning issued over all Ukraine – Ukrainian officials

Air raid warning issued over all Ukraine – Ukrainian officials
  • Border service: ‘An overall air raid alert is in place in Ukraine. Go to shelters’

Air raid alerts were issued across all of Ukraine on Thursday following warnings by Ukrainian officials that Russia was preparing a new wave of missile and drone strikes.
“An overall air raid alert is in place in Ukraine. Go to shelters,” country’s border service wrote on Telegram messaging app.


Saudi-based STGC launches awards to recognize sustainable tourism efforts  

Saudi-based STGC launches awards to recognize sustainable tourism efforts  
Updated 17 min 37 sec ago

Saudi-based STGC launches awards to recognize sustainable tourism efforts  

Saudi-based STGC launches awards to recognize sustainable tourism efforts  

RIYADH: A new award system recognizing achievements in sustainable tourism was launched during the World Travel and Tourism Council Global Summit. The Riyadh-based Sustainable Tourism Global Center used the summit as an opportunity to announce its latest stride in the battle for a more sustainable future. 

The “Sustainable Travel Awards” will recognize individuals and organizations that address climate change, protect nature and support communities. There will be 10 awards in total geared towards recognizing high-impact solutions that are already implemented and that are able to demonstrate a measurable positive impact on the environment. They will be divided into three categories — climate, nature and communities — with three accolades awarded under each category. One leading figure will be identified as a true champion of sustainability and receive an individual award.  

Gloria Guevara, chief special advisor to the Minister of Tourism and a global panel of sustainability experts has been be appointed to judge the awards. 

Guevara said: “We are enormously proud to be launching these awards to recognize the outstanding work being done all over the world in different areas of sustainability work from climate change actions to preserving nature and supporting opportunities for communities. 

“Sustainability has been a core area of debate at the WTTC Global Summit and we are confident that our awards will identify and recognize the outstanding work in this field and incentivize others to innovate and contribute to change.” 

Special guests, supermodels Elle Macpherson, Adriana Lima and Valeria Mazza were there to present the awards in the Saudi capital.  

Announced by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at the Saudi Green Initiative and the UN Climate Change conference, or COP26, in Glasgow last year, the STGC brings together governments, international organizations, academic bodies, financing institutions and industry associations. 

The STGC aims to reduce the tourism sector’s estimated 8 percent contribution to total global greenhouse gases and move toward net-zero emissions.


Why leg before wicket remains cricket’s most contentious law

Why leg before wicket remains cricket’s most contentious law
Updated 22 min 32 sec ago

Why leg before wicket remains cricket’s most contentious law

Why leg before wicket remains cricket’s most contentious law
  • International, pro cricket has technology, experienced umpires but lower down sporting pyramid interpretation of LBW can suffer bias

It would be rare to find a cricketer at any level who has not fallen victim to a leg-before-wicket decision which he or she felt to be unjust.

Although caught is the most common form of dismissal, with 57 percent, LBW accounts for around 14 percent of dismissals, meaning that its importance should not be treated lightly.

This is placed into greater perspective because the decision rests with the umpire.

In today’s international cricket, umpires are supported and informed by technology and by an off-the-field third umpire who has access to the technology.

In professional cricket, professionally trained umpires make decisions without such support.

In club cricket, there are umpires, usually former players, who have obtained umpiring qualifications but there are many matches at a lower level where the umpires are also players in the match. This does raise the issue of potential bias, especially as the relevant law is open to significant interpretation.

The original cricket laws of 1744 did not contain a dismissal mode of LBW, only requiring no “standing unfair to strike” by strikers.

In those days, a curved bat was used to hit underarm deliveries, so the striker needed to stand at distance from the leg stump to provide an arc to swing at the ball. Thirty years later, the introduction of straight bats changed this stance and strikers were able to make strategic use of their legs to defend the wicket.

Revised rules in 1774 specified that the batsman was to be given out if he, “puts his leg before the wicket with a design to stop the ball and actually prevent the ball from hitting his wicket by it.”

In 1788, the word design was removed, and accidental obstruction added, while in 1823, the point of interception was widened from legs to any part of the body. These changes led to one commentator expressing the view in 1868 that the LBW law was, “the most perplexing and disagreeable of the whole code.”

There are many who hold this view a century-and-a-half later. Imagine a club cricket match in which players double as umpires in rotation.

The match is heading for an exciting conclusion, four runs to win and one wicket to fall. The away team’s captain is batting, the non-striker is a young man with no batting prowess, and the umpire is a member of the away team. He is very experienced and is known not to like the home team very much following years of fierce rivalry. In particular, he does not like the person who is about to bowl.

When the ball is delivered it pitches outside the off stump, unexpectedly cuts back sharply to the surprise of the away team captain, who thrusts his padded leg toward the off-side in the direction of the ball, which hits him on his front leg, but outside of a wicket-to-wicket line. There is a prolonged and vociferous appeal for LBW from the home team and supporters.

In this combustible situation, no one seems to have noticed that the ball has ricocheted off the batter’s pads and is about to reach the boundary.

This is substantial information for the player-umpire to absorb in a few seconds and, on his assessment, the outcome of the match will be decided. He has studied the laws of cricket intensely, but he is in a complete dilemma. He knows that law 36 requires that all of five circumstances need to apply for the striker to be given out. First, the delivery needs to be legal, which it is.

Second, the ball must pitch in line between wicket and wicket, or on the offside of the striker’s wicket, which it has. Thirdly, the ball has not touched the bat, but the striker has intercepted the ball with a part of his person, which is the case. Fourthly, the point of impact must be between wicket and wicket, which it is not. However, if the striker has made no genuine attempt to play the ball with the bat, then the point of impact is not only between wicket and wicket but also outside of the line of the off stump. Fifthly, the ball would have hit the wicket but for the interception.

It is not difficult to discern that, in this circumstance, any umpire would be taxed to make a just decision. When local rivalry, history, aligned umpires, and a tense finish combine, the context is quite different to international matches with neutral umpires. Nevertheless, the principles are the same. The first three criteria for dismissal have been met, but have the fourth and fifth ones? The umpire must determine if the striker made a genuine attempt to play the ball and that the ball would have hit the wicket.

The law does not define genuine. Does it mean anything other than a deliberate attempt to not play the ball? Without the support of technology, who can really be certain that the ball would have hit the wicket? Many times, I have seen a ball which had beaten the striker and looked certain to hit the wicket deviate or bounce over the top.

Our fictious umpire is left not only with these considerations but also the consequences of his decision. If he gives his captain out, he will incur the wrath of not only his captain but his whole team for a long time. The home team will delight in his discomfort. If he says not out, he will face the full wrath of the home team and accusations of bias and, even worse, cheating.

Prior to the introduction of neutral umpires to international cricket in 1992 and the later introduction of review technology, home umpires gave more visiting batters out LBW than home batters in Test matches.

Controversial LBW decisions still occur at international level, but with a much lower proportion than at club cricket level. There, the potential for bias and simmering controversy is ever present with the LBW law.