Freed US-Iranian citizen lands in Oman after detention in Iran

Freed US-Iranian citizen lands in Oman after detention in Iran
Baquer Namazi is a former UNICEF official who served as governor of Iran’s oil-rich Khuzestan province under the US-backed shah. (The Namazi family via AP)
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Updated 05 October 2022

Freed US-Iranian citizen lands in Oman after detention in Iran

Freed US-Iranian citizen lands in Oman after detention in Iran
  • Baquer Namazi, a former UNICEF official, was detained in 2016 when he went to Iran to press for the release of his son Siamak
  • The US has been pressing for the release of these two men and two other Americans

MUSCAT: Baquer Namazi, one of four US citizens whose freedom Washington had demanded in the context of any revived nuclear deal with Tehran, landed in neutral Oman Wednesday, his lawyer said.

Namazi, a former UNICEF official, was detained in February 2016 when he traveled to Iran to press for the release of his son Siamak, who had been arrested in October of the previous year.

“Mohammad Baquer Namazi, who had been released from prison a few days ago, left Iran today (Wednesday),” the Iranian state broadcaster said, posting footage of Namazi boarding a plane.

Human rights lawyer Jared Genser later confirmed via Namazi’s cousin who traveled with the 85-year-old on the plane that he had arrived in Muscat, Oman’s capital.

The United States has been pressing for the release of the Namazis and two other Americans amid efforts to revive the 2015 nuclear deal between Iran and major powers.

His son Siamak, “also wrongfully detained,” has been given furlough from prison but remains in Iran, a State Department spokesperson told AFP.

“Baquer Namazi was unjustly detained in Iran and then not permitted to leave the county after serving his sentence, despite his repeated requirement for urgent medical attention,” the spokesperson said.

“We understand that the lifting of the travel ban and his son’s furlough were related to his medical requirement.”

The United Nations said last week that the pair had been allowed to leave Iran, after an appeal from Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The Namazis were both were convicted of espionage in October 2016 and sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Baquer Namazi was released on medical leave in 2018 and had been serving his sentence under house arrest.

At least two other American citizens are currently held in Iran.

Businessman Emad Sharqi was sentenced last year to 10 years in prison for espionage, and environmentalist Morad Tahbaz, who is also a British national, was arrested in 2018 and released on bail in July.

A drive to salvage the 2015 nuclear deal began in April last year, with the aim of returning the United States to the accord through the lifting of sanctions reimposed by president Donald Trump in 2018 and Iran’s return to full compliance.

The signing of the original deal was accompanied by the release of detained Americans and Namazi’s departure has been seen in Iran as a move that should be mirrored by the other side.

“With the finalization of negotiations between Iran and the United States to release the prisoners of both countries, $7 billion of Iran’s blocked resources will be released,” state news agency IRNA reported.

But the US State Department on Sunday dismissed the reported link as “categorically false.”

Billions of dollars in Iranian funds have been frozen in a number of countries — notably China, South Korea and Japan — since the US reimposed sanctions.

forgotten-arabs-of-iran-launcher.txt Who has access H D d E System properties Type Text Size 30 KB Storage used 30 KBOwned by Saudi Research and Publishing Co. Location shorthand story launchers Owner Harold Jacinto Modified 24 Apr 2022 by Harold Jacinto Opened 15:51 by me Created 24 Apr 2022 Add a description Viewers can download

The forgotten Arabs of Iran
A century ago, the autonomous sheikhdom of Arabistan was absorbed by force into the Persian state. Today the Arabs of Ahwaz are Iran's most persecuted minority

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Kuwait questions UN over ‘allowing Israeli occupations’ criminal violations’

Kuwait questions UN over ‘allowing Israeli occupations’ criminal violations’
Updated 16 sec ago

Kuwait questions UN over ‘allowing Israeli occupations’ criminal violations’

Kuwait questions UN over ‘allowing Israeli occupations’ criminal violations’
  • Kuwaiti diplomat emphasized that his country holds special attention to the Palestinian cause
  • “The occupation is the disease which ... fought, killed, displaced, destroyed families and houses and environment ... of our Palestinian people,” Tarek Al-Bannai said

NEW YORK: The international community’s inability to address the Palestinian cause and to hold Israel accountable is the biggest failure in UN history, a Kuwaiti diplomat said on Thursday.
Addressing a General Assembly session on the Palestinian issue, Kuwait’s Permanent Representative to the UN Tarek Al-Bannai questioned the international community for “allowing the Israeli occupation (to) carry out systematic criminal violations without being held accountable or punished as if it is above the law.
“For how long UN member countries continue to deal with the just Palestinian cause with double standards? And for how long this silence continues to deprive the Palestinian people of their legitimate rights, as if the rights of the Palestinian people are exempted from international laws?” asked Al-Bannai.
Kuwait’s News Agency cited the diplomat as saying that decades have passed and these questions have not been answered, “and the inability of the international community to address the Palestinian cause and its inability to hold Israel, the occupying force, accountable, is the biggest failure in the UN’s history in general, and (the) Security Council in particular, this is a disgrace.”
He added that the Palestinian people are suffering under the Israeli occupying force “without any clear-cut international reactions to lift this suppression and injustice.”
The Israeli occupation continues violating the UN Charter, international law, international humanitarian law and international law of human rights, the 1949 Geneva Convention and other global treaties, he noted.
“The occupation is the disease which ... fought, killed, displaced, destroyed families and houses and environment ... of our Palestinian people,” Al-Bannai said.
He cited a report about the Palestinian people which mentioned that expansion of Jewish settlements, namely in East Jerusalem, was threatening creation of the Palestinian state.
According to KUNA, Al-Bannai quoted the UN Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process Tor Wennesland as saying: “After decades of continuous violence, illegal settlement expansion, stalled negotiations, the conflict has once again reached a boiling point.”
He touched on what was stated by Special Rapporteur Francesca Albanese on the human rights situation in Palestine’s occupied territories since 1967, describing it as “a deliberately obsessive, racist and repressive regime aimed at preventing the realization of the Palestinian people’s right to self-determination.”
He added that by demolishing symbols that express Palestinian identity, the occupation jeopardizes Palestinian cultural existence, and by suppressing Palestinian political activity, the occupation violates the ability of Palestinians to free themselves from foreign domination and control.
The diplomat affirmed that Kuwait strongly supports Palestine to obtain full membership in the UN, and calls on all countries that do not recognize Palestine as a state to review themselves and align their positions with international law.
Al-Bannai renewed Kuwait’s full support for the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, UNRWA, believing in the importance of its role in easing the suffering of Palestinian refugees.


Turkiye calls for US understanding ahead of possible Syria operation

Turkiye calls for US understanding ahead of possible Syria operation
Updated 01 December 2022

Turkiye calls for US understanding ahead of possible Syria operation

Turkiye calls for US understanding ahead of possible Syria operation
  • Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar: ‘The US asked us to re-evaluate; we emphasized that they should understand us’
  • US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin on Wednesday told his Turkish counterpart of his ‘strong opposition’ to a new Turkish military operation in Syria

ANKARA: Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar called on the United States on Thursday to show understanding over a possible new Turkish military operation in Syria, after Washington voiced its “strong opposition” to such a move.
Turkiye has been threatening a new incursion into northern Syria for months, and stepped up preparations last month after a deadly bomb attack in Istanbul it blamed on a Kurdish militants.
“The US asked us to re-evaluate. We conveyed to them our sensitivities and thoughts, and asked them to keep their promises. We emphasized that they should understand us,” Akar told reporters.
Turkiye also asked allied countries that have a military presence in Syria not to allow local militias to use their flags and uniforms, Akar added. “We are reminding them that they should keep terrorists away from themselves and eventually they should cut their ties with terrorist organizations,” he said.
Turkiye sees the Kurdish YPG militia, the leading presence in the US-allied Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), as the Syrian wing of the PKK militant group and labels both of them as terrorist organizations.
The PKK is also considered a terrorist group by the United States and the European Union.
The PKK and SDF have denied involvement in the Nov. 13 bombing of a busy pedestrian avenue in Istanbul.
US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin on Wednesday told his Turkish counterpart of his “strong opposition” to a new Turkish military operation in Syria and voiced concern over the escalating situation in the county.


Iran’s World Cup team gets tepid welcome home, amid protests

Iran’s World Cup team gets tepid welcome home, amid protests
Updated 01 December 2022

Iran’s World Cup team gets tepid welcome home, amid protests

Iran’s World Cup team gets tepid welcome home, amid protests
  • The players returned from Qatar late Wednesday, a day after their 1-0 loss
  • Anti-government protesters, considering the team a symbol of Iran's clerical rulers, had celebrated the loss in some Iranian cities with fireworks and cheers

BAGHDAD: Iran’s national soccer team received a subdued welcome home after their World Cup defeat against the United States, a match played against the backdrop of ongoing anti-government protests in Iran.
One Iranian man was shot dead celebrating the American victory.
The players returned from Qatar late Wednesday, a day after their 1-0 loss. Anti-government protesters, considering the team a symbol of Iran’s clerical rulers, had celebrated the loss in some Iranian cities with fireworks and cheers.
One man was shot dead by Iranian security forces in northwest Iran for honking his car horn in support of the US victory, the Oslo-based rights monitor Iran Human Rights reported on Thursday.
Iran’s treatment of the players will likely be scrutinized because they refrained from singing the Islamic Republic’s national anthem during their opening World Cup match. Many considered the move a show of solidarity with the protests. The team did sang the anthem in subsequent matches.
A few dozen fans greeted the national team’s return at Tehran’s international airport late Wednesday, with people cheering and waving the Iranian flag.
Yet the players have faced biting criticism from anti-government protesters who have blamed the team for not being more vocal about the security force’s violent put down of the demonstrations. Human rights groups say over 400 protesters have been killed in the crackdown, with thousands more arrested.
An image of players bowing in the presence of President Ebrahim Raisi before setting off to the tournament was widely criticized by activists on social media. A hard-line cleric, Raisi has likened protesters to “flies” and dismissed the movement as a foreign plot, without offering any proof.
Mehran Samak, 27, was shot dead after honking his car in support of the US win after Tuesday’s match in the city of Bandar Anzali in northwest Iran. Oslo-based Iran Human Rights reported he was “shot in the head by state forces when he went out to celebrate the Islamic Republic’s loss.”
Samak is also a childhood friend of Iranian midfielder Saeed Ezatollahi, who mourned his death on his social media. But again he received criticism from activists for not explicitly stating Samak was killed by government forces.
Many Iranian celebrities have however been targeted by the government with arrest or other measures for speaking out on behalf of the protesters.
Iranian officials acknowledged but downplayed compatriots celebrating the US win. Gen. Hossein Salami, chief of the paramilitary Revolutionary Guard, said those who had celebrated were doing so on “behalf of the enemies,” adding “it is not important to us.” His comments appeared in the semi-official Tasnim news agency.
A former culture minister and editor-in-chief of the Ettelaat newspaper, Abbas Salehi, who has close ties with Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, tweeted: “Iran’s defeat in the game against America was bitter, but even more bitter was the happiness of some people.”
Iran was eliminated from the tournament in Qatar following the loss to the US on Tuesday that saw the players scrambling to score a goal in the last remaining minutes of the game. Striker Sardar Azmoun told reporters he was not satisfied with his performance in the last match.
It was the sixth time Iran has participated in the World Cup.
Anti-government protests first erupted in September, following the death of 22-year old Mahsa Amini in the custody of Iran’s morality police in the capital, Tehran. The protests quickly grew into the most serious challenge to Iran’s theocracy since its establishment in the 1979 Islamic Revolution.


Lebanon MPs again fail to fill vacant presidency

Lebanon MPs again fail to fill vacant presidency
Updated 01 December 2022

Lebanon MPs again fail to fill vacant presidency

Lebanon MPs again fail to fill vacant presidency
  • Lebanon has been without a head of state for a month after president Michel Aoun left office at the end of October

BEIRUT: Lawmakers in crisis-hit Lebanon failed to elect a new president on Thursday for an eighth time, despite the deepening impact of the political deadlock on the country’s economic woes.

Lebanon has been without a head of state for a month after president Michel Aoun left office at the end of October with no successor.

Parliament is split between supporters of the powerful Iran-backed Hezbollah movement and its opponents, neither of whom have a clear majority.

Lawmaker Michel Moawad, who is seen as close to the United States, won the support of 37 lawmakers Thursday — well short of the required majority — while 52 spoilt ballots were cast, mainly by pro-Hezbollah lawmakers.

Only 111 of parliament’s 128 lawmakers showed up for the vote.

Some MPs wrote in mock choices on their ballots, with one vote cast for Brazil’s leftist president-elect Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva.

Parliament is “not shouldering its responsibilities,” charged lawmaker Antoine Habchi of the Lebanese Forces, a Christian party opposed to Hezbollah.

Electing a president, naming a prime minister and forming a government can take months or even years of political horse-trading.

Lebanon can ill-afford a prolonged power vacuum as it grapples with a financial crisis dubbed by the World Bank as one of the worst in modern history, with a currency in free fall, severe electricity shortages and soaring poverty rates.

The country’s caretaker government is unable to enact the sweeping reforms demanded by international lenders as a condition for releasing billions of dollars in bailout loans.

Hezbollah opposes Moawad’s candidacy, and the Iran-backed group’s leader Hassan Nasrallah called last month for a president ready to stand up to the United States.

Moawad has good relations with Washington and has repeatedly called for the disarming of Hezbollah — the only faction to keep its weapons after the end of Lebanon’s 1975-1990 civil war.

Former president Aoun’s own election in 2016 followed a more than two-year vacancy at the presidential palace as lawmakers made 45 failed attempts before reaching a consensus on his candidacy.

By convention, Lebanon’s presidency goes to a Maronite Christian, the premiership is reserved for a Sunni Muslim and the post of parliament speaker goes to a Shiite Muslim.

Parliament is expected to convene for a new attempt to elect a president on December 8.


Two killed in Israeli West Bank raid – Palestinian health ministry

Two killed in Israeli West Bank raid – Palestinian health ministry
Updated 01 December 2022

Two killed in Israeli West Bank raid – Palestinian health ministry

Two killed in Israeli West Bank raid – Palestinian health ministry
  • Israeli media: The two men killed were commanders in the Islamic Jihad militant group
  • The military has been conducting months of arrest raids in the West Bank

JERUSALEM: Two Palestinians were killed Thursday during an Israeli military raid in a militant stronghold in the occupied West Bank, the Palestinian Health Ministry said.
Reports by Israeli media said the two men killed were commanders in the Islamic Jihad militant group. The Palestinian Health Ministry identified the men as Naeem Jamal Zubaidi, 27, and Mohammad Ayman Saadi, 26, but did not confirm whether they were militants.
According to the reports, the military was conducting an arrest raid in the city of Jenin and was met by gunfire. The military responded, killing the two men.
The Israeli military did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
The military has been conducting months of arrest raids in the West Bank, prompted by a spate of Palestinian attacks against Israelis in the spring that killed 19 people. The military says the raids are meant to dismantle militant networks and thwart future attacks, but the Palestinians say they entrench Israel’s open-ended occupation and undermine their own security forces.
The raids have ratcheted up tensions between Israelis and Palestinians, triggering another wave of Palestinian attacks in recent weeks that have killed an additional eight people.
More than 130 Palestinians have been killed this year, making 2022 the deadliest since 2006. The Israeli military says many of those killed have been militants but local youths protesting the incursions as well as others not involved in the violence have also been killed.
Israel captured the West Bank, along with east Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians want those territories for their hoped-for future state. Substantive peace talks were last held more than a decade ago, and with Israel headed toward what’s likely to be its most right-wing government ever, there appears to be no prospect for a negotiated solution in the near future.