Houthis impose gender segregation at Sanaa university college

The Houthis have implemented gender segregation at Sanaa University’s Mass Communication College. (Faculty of Mass Communication, Sana’a University)
The Houthis have implemented gender segregation at Sanaa University’s Mass Communication College. (Faculty of Mass Communication, Sana’a University)
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Updated 26 July 2023
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Houthis impose gender segregation at Sanaa university college

The Houthis have implemented gender segregation at Sanaa University’s Mass Communication College. (Faculty of Mass Communication
  • Male students will now be required to report to the college on Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays
  • Female students must attend on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays

AL-MUKALLA: The Iran-backed Houthis have implemented gender segregation at Sanaa University’s Mass Communication College as part of a morals campaign in Yemeni regions under the militia’s control.
Male students will now be required to report to the college on Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays, while female students must attend on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, according to a decision circulated by the college’s Houthi-backed students’ union.
Houthi leaders and media outlets have justified the move by claiming that the changes were made to avoid rapes and to uphold Islamic norms that prohibited women from interacting with men.
In a tweet, Houthi leader Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi said: “What the university has done is in accordance with the female students’ desires, as they possess modesty, pride, and elevated Islamic values.”
To convince members of the public about the ruling, the Houthi-run media said that free mixing among male and female students would result in rape and sexual harassment, as well as a decrease in innovation and productivity.
In an article published on Sunday in the Houthi-run Al-Thawra newspaper, one writer said: “Western studies reveal the devastating effects of mixing in universities. Mixing kills ambition, buries creativity, and eliminates student intelligence.”
In recent years, the Houthis have launched a morals campaign in Sanaa and other areas under their control, imprisoning female models and singers, banning music, closing cafes where men and women interact, imposing a dress code on women who leave their homes, and prohibiting co-education.
Yemenis from many walks of life, including Sanaa university students and activists in the city, have opposed the gender segregation decision, and demanded that the Houthis concentrate on enhancing the quality of education and compensating university professors and other public employees.
Dr. Ibrahim Al-Kebsi, a university professor who was kidnapped by the Houthis last year for criticizing the group on social media, said the Houthis prohibited women and men from mixing in educational institutions, while their economic policies had forced many poor women to ask for help in the streets and wait in long lines to obtain cooking gas.
“I call on the Yemeni people, all students in universities, colleges, and institutes, as well as the faculty of all Yemeni universities, to reject this decision and to proclaim the suspension of studies until this authority apologizes to the Yemeni people,” Al-Kebsi added.
Some Yemen observers have warned that the escalating Houthi persecution of women could force them to abandon their workplaces and classrooms.
In a tweet, Yemeni human rights activist Baraa Shiban said: “Soon, many women will disappear from public life in areas under the Houthis control.”
The Houthis have also prohibited women from traveling between Yemeni cities or abroad without a male companion or mahram, and they are still detaining several Yemeni activists and models, including Entisar Al-Hammadi.
Based on the militia’s history of mistreating women, Abdullah Esmail, a Yemeni journalist and researcher, did not rule out the possibility of the Houthis taking more tough measures against women, such as firing them from their jobs and forcing them to remain at home.
He told Arab News that the Houthis had been taken aback by public outrage over the decision.
Esmail said: “The Houthi group is merely replicating the ideology of the mullahs in Tehran which has nothing to do with religion, morality, or ideals. This group portrays itself as a guardian of morality, but it is in violation of morality.”
 


US-UK forces launch strikes on Yemen’s Hodeidah and Kamaran Island: Houthi-run Al Masirah TV

US-UK forces launch strikes on Yemen’s Hodeidah and Kamaran Island: Houthi-run Al Masirah TV
Updated 18 sec ago
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US-UK forces launch strikes on Yemen’s Hodeidah and Kamaran Island: Houthi-run Al Masirah TV

US-UK forces launch strikes on Yemen’s Hodeidah and Kamaran Island: Houthi-run Al Masirah TV

CAIRO: Al-Masirah TV, the main television news outlet run by Yemen’s Houthi movement, said on Monday that US and British forces have carried out at least six airstrikes on Yemen’s Hodeidah International airport and four strikes on Kamaran Island near the port of Salif off the Red Sea.

More to follow...


Displaced Lebanese return to southern border to mourn, pray over Eid

Displaced Lebanese return to southern border to mourn, pray over Eid
Updated 17 June 2024
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Displaced Lebanese return to southern border to mourn, pray over Eid

Displaced Lebanese return to southern border to mourn, pray over Eid
  • Israel and Hezbollah have traded near-daily cross-border fire since Hamas’ Oct. 7 attack

NAQURA, Lebanon: Some displaced residents of southern Lebanon returned Monday to their towns for a key Muslim holiday to pray and mourn loved ones killed in months of cross-border violence between Israel and Hezbollah.
“Today is Eid Al-Adha, but it’s completely different this year,” said teacher Rabab Yazbek, 44, at a cemetery in the coastal town of Naqura, from which many residents have fled.
Every family has lost someone, “whether a relative, friend or neighbor,” Yazbek said, adding that two people she had taught had been killed.
Israel and Hezbollah, a powerful Lebanese movement allied with Hamas, have traded near-daily cross-border fire since the Palestinian militant group’s October 7 attack on Israel which triggered war in the Gaza Strip.
The violence has killed at least 473 people in Lebanon, most of them fighters but also including 92 civilians, according to an AFP tally.
Israeli authorities say at least 15 soldiers and 11 civilians have been killed in the country’s north.
At the cemetery, women in black chadors consoled each other at the shiny new graves adorned with flowers and large pictures of the dead, including Hezbollah fighters.
The Naqura municipality said it had coordinated with the Lebanese army so that residents could safely visit the cemetery and mosque for two hours for Eid Al-Adha, which for many Shiite Muslims in Lebanon began on Monday.
Residents reportedly returned to a number of south Lebanon border villages on Monday morning as part of similar initiatives.
Yellow Hezbollah flags and green ones belonging to the group’s ally the Amal movement flew at the recently established cemetery near the sea, located just a stone’s throw from the United Nations peacekeepers’ headquarters.
Lebanese soldiers accompanied the residents as they entered the town.
The army coordinates with the UN peacekeepers, who in turn communicate with the Israeli side as part of efforts to maintain calm.
In Naqura, a damaged sign reading “thank you for your visit” lay along the highway.
Amid the concrete rubble and twisted metal of one building, the shattered glass of a family photo lay scattered on the ground.
Nearby, potted plants hung from the veranda rails of another devastated structure, with a pink child’s toy car among the debris.
Rawand Yazbek, 50, was inspecting her clothing shop, whose glass store front had been destroyed, though the rest remained largely intact.
“A thousand thanks to God,” she said, grateful that not all was lost.
“As you can see... our stores are full of goods,” she said, pointing to shelves and racks of colorful clothes.
Hezbollah stepped up attacks against northern Israel last week after an Israeli strike killed a senior commander from the movement.
The Iran-backed group has not claimed any attacks since Saturday afternoon.
Lebanese official media reported Israeli bombardment in the country’s south over the weekend, as well as a deadly strike on Monday. Hezbollah said later that one of its fighters had been killed.
Like other residents who support the Hezbollah and Amal movements, Naqura municipality head Abbas Awada called attacks on the town “cowardly.”
Last week, a strike there blamed on Israel killed an employee of the area’s public water company.
More than 95,000 people in Lebanon have been displaced by the hostilities, according to the UN’s International Organization for Migration.
Tens of thousands have also been displaced on the Israeli side of the frontier.
Hezbollah lawmaker Hassan Ezzedine, among a large crowd that attended prayers at the Naqura mosque, said the turnout was a message that “this land is ours, we will not leave it.”
“We support this resistance (Hezbollah) because it’s what protects us, it’s what defends us,” he said.


Palestinian Authority at risk of collapse, Norway says

Palestinian Authority at risk of collapse, Norway says
Updated 17 June 2024
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Palestinian Authority at risk of collapse, Norway says

Palestinian Authority at risk of collapse, Norway says
  • Norway chairs the international donor group to the Palestinians and is a backer of the Palestinian Authority

OSLO: The Palestinian Authority could collapse in the coming months, Norwegian Foreign Minister Espen Barth Eide said on Monday, citing a lack of funding, continuing violence and the fact that half a million Palestinians are not allowed to work in Israel.
“The Palestinian Authority, with whom we work closely, are warning us that they might be collapsing this summer,” Barth Eide said.
Norway chairs the international donor group to the Palestinians and is a backer of the PA.


Jordan braces for scorching heatwave as temperatures soar

Jordan braces for scorching heatwave as temperatures soar
Updated 17 June 2024
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Jordan braces for scorching heatwave as temperatures soar

Jordan braces for scorching heatwave as temperatures soar
  • The Gulf of Aqaba reached highs of 45 celsius
  • Temperatures in Jordan are set to rise slightly, with the heatwave persisting

AMMAN: The Jordan Meteorological Department forecast extreme heat for Monday, with most regions of the country — particularly the desert areas, Jordan Valley, Dead Sea and Aqaba — experiencing intense temperatures.

The Gulf of Aqaba reached highs of 45 celsius, the Southern Jordan Valley 44 celsius, Dead Sea 43 celsius, while the Desert Regions and the Northern Jordan Valley reached highs of 41 celsius. 

Cloud cover at medium and high altitudes is expected in the south and east of the Kingdom, state news agency Petra reported, with moderate northwesterly winds occasionally becoming brisk.

The JMD cautioned people against prolonged sun exposure, which could lead to dehydration, especially for vulnerable groups such as the elderly and those with health conditions. It also highlighted the risk of forest fires and the dangers of leaving children or flammable items, like perfumes and sanitizers, inside vehicles.

Looking ahead to Tuesday, temperatures in Jordan are set to rise slightly, with the heatwave persisting. Most areas will remain hot, the JMD said, and desert regions will face sweltering conditions. Northeasterly winds will prevail, shifting to moderate northwesterly by evening.

The heatwave will continue into Wednesday, with another slight increase in temperatures. Conditions will be blistering and dry across the highlands, the JMD warned, with extreme heat persisting elsewhere. Northeasterly winds will turn to moderate northwesterly later in the day.

Thursday will bring a modest reprieve as temperatures dip slightly. However, the weather will remain hot across most areas, with the desert, Jordan Valley, Dead Sea, and Aqaba continuing to sizzle. Moderate northwesterly winds will occasionally become brisk.


Iran calls for joint action by Islamic nations to stop Gaza war

Iran calls for joint action by Islamic nations to stop Gaza war
Updated 17 June 2024
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Iran calls for joint action by Islamic nations to stop Gaza war

Iran calls for joint action by Islamic nations to stop Gaza war
  • Israel’s military offensive on Gaza has killed at least 37,337 people so far

TEHRAN: Iran’s Acting Foreign Minister Ali Bagheri Kani has called for joint action on the part of Islamic countries to pressure Israel into ending its brutal military activities in Gaza, which have devastated most of the enclave and killed thousands of Palestinians there.

Israel’s military offensive on Gaza has killed at least 37,337 people, mostly civilian women and children, since the Oct. 7 Hamas attack, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry in Gaza.

Humanitarian supplies for millions of Palestinians displaced by the conflict have been squeezed despite the Israeli military declaring it would “pause” fighting daily around a southern route to facilitate aid flows.

The Iranian official also spoke with his Afghan counterpart Amir Khan Muttaqi via telephone on Sunday, with the two discussing bilateral relations as well as the situation in war-ravaged Gaza.

Kani reiterated Iran’s readiness to help Kabul resolve its challenges and achieve growth, Iran’s news agency IRNA reported.