Eight killed as jeep plunges into ravine in northwest Pakistan

Eight killed as jeep plunges into ravine in northwest Pakistan
Recue officials shift bodies of travelers killed in a jeep accident in Shangla on May 27, 2024. (Photo courtesy: Rescue 1122)
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Updated 27 May 2024
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Eight killed as jeep plunges into ravine in northwest Pakistan

Eight killed as jeep plunges into ravine in northwest Pakistan
  • The incident occurred in the northwestern Shangla district after the driver lost control of the vehicle
  • Road crashes are common in Pakistan, where traffic rules are rarely followed, roads are in poor condition

ISLAMABAD: Eight people, including women and children, were killed after a jeep plunged into a ravine in Pakistan’s northwestern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province, rescue officials said.
The incident occurred in KP’s Shangla district, when the driver lost control of the vehicle and it fell into the ravine, according a spokesperson of the Rescue 1122 service.
As a consequence, four women and three children were killed on the spot, while one person was injured who was shifted to the district headquarters hospital.
“A rescue team recovered bodies of the victims and handed them over to relatives,” the Rescue 1122 spokesperson said in a statement.
The spokesperson said the injured person later succumbed to his injuries at the hospital.
Road accidents are common in Pakistan, where traffic rules are rarely followed and roads, particularly in many rural areas, are in poor condition. In the country’s mountainous north, such tragedies are frequently reported.
In March, at least 20 people were killed and over a dozen others were injured after a bus plunged into a gorge in the northern Gilgit-Baltistan (GB) region.


Samar Khan becomes first Pakistani woman to snowboard down Europe’s highest peak

Samar Khan becomes first Pakistani woman to snowboard down Europe’s highest peak
Updated 11 sec ago
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Samar Khan becomes first Pakistani woman to snowboard down Europe’s highest peak

Samar Khan becomes first Pakistani woman to snowboard down Europe’s highest peak
  • Khan is first woman ever to have cycled on third largest non-polar glacial system, Biafo Glacier and Godwin Austen Glacier
  • Hailing from Pakistan’s Dir, Khan is also the first Pakistani to have cycled on the roof of Africa, Kilimanjaro in 2017

ISLAMABAD: Adventure athlete Samar Khan said on Sunday she had ascended Mount Elbrus, the highest peak in Europe, and snowboarded down, becoming the first Pakistani woman to achieve the milestone.

Khan is a Pakistani adventure athlete and the first woman in the world to have cycled on the third largest non-polar glacial system, Biafo Glacier and Godwin Austen Glacier, in the Karakoram mountains of Gilgit Baltistan. She is also the first Pakistani to have cycled on the roof of Africa, Kilimanjaro in 2017.

“I’m pleased to announce that I have successfully climbed Europe’s highest peak, Mt. Elbrus, and snowboarded down, becoming the first Pakistani to pioneer this feat in the world of action sports,” Khan wrote on Instagram. 

“I set out for the summit push around 3am and reached the top by 10am with a green flag, followed by an exhilarating snowboarding descent from Elbrus.”

In the past, Khan has been a mentee as part of the ESPNW Global Sports Mentoring Program in the US. She also runs an initiative, ‘Samar Camp’, offering sports camps like mountain biking, backpacking, and snowboarding for girls and women in Pakistan.

Khan won a silver medal in the Sadia Khan Championship in 2022 and emerged as the winner of the Red Bull Homerun snowboarding category in 2021.

Khan hails from Dir in Pakistan’s northwestern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. 


On Eid in Karachi, surge in orders for specials made using sacrificial meat from customers

On Eid in Karachi, surge in orders for specials made using sacrificial meat from customers
Updated 7 min 59 sec ago
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On Eid in Karachi, surge in orders for specials made using sacrificial meat from customers

On Eid in Karachi, surge in orders for specials made using sacrificial meat from customers
  • On Eid in Karachi, surge in orders for specials made using sacrificial meat from customers
  • Slow cooked meats like sajji and roast, malai boti, and all kind of kebabs are among favorites customers get restaurants to prepare 

KARACHI: While sweets and desserts steal the spotlight during Eid Al-Fitr around the world, on Eid Al-Adha the focus shifts to savory delights, especially dishes prepared with the mutton and beef of animals sacrificed to mark the annual religious holiday. 

Things are no different in Karachi, Pakistan’s commercial and culinary center, where restaurants on the iconic Burns Road and other food streets start preparing meat specials for Eid. 

“People don’t realize it’s Eid-Al-Adha if they don’t get spicy dishes,” said Agha Owais, the owner of Agha Sajji, a restaurant that specializes in slow cooked meats in various forms as well as spicy biryani rice. 

After the Eid sacrifice, Owais said, his restaurant got busy preparing hundreds of orders from people who brought over sacrificial meat to the eatery for special dishes to be prepared using it.

“The women at home are often tired during Eid so they prefer to entertain guests by opting for good, spicy, and clean food from reputable places with high-quality ingredients,” Owais said. 

A resident of Karachi civil lines, Sadiq Abubakar, said he preferred to have biryani and dried meat dishes prepared at home on Eid but ordered BBQ specials from restaurants. 

Among favorites are malai boti, melt-in-the-mouth chunks of boneless chicken, lamb or beef marinated in a mildly flavored cream sauce made with fresh herbs, seekh kebabs made with spiced minced or ground meat formed into cylinders on skewers and grilled, and dhaga kebabs, made without a binding agent like eggs, chickpea or maize flour, but in which a dhaga, or thread, is wrapped around the kebab to hold it better over the grill while cooking.

“Sometimes we give a goat’s leg to a restaurant and get karahi made out of it,” Abubakar said.

“IT’S THE TASTE”

S.M. Iqbal, the owner of New Delhi Gola Kebab House, said his restaurant was closed for Eid dining in order to complete takeaway orders, especially made using people’s own sacrificial meat.

“People also invite us [for catering] to their homes, but we don’t go very often because our outdoor work is at a large scale,” Iqbal said. “We can’t go for 10-15 kgs [of meat], we only go if there’s an order for at least 100 people.”

He said most customers got dhaga and fried kebabs made, which were a specialty at his restaurant.

“It’s the taste that pushes people to bring sacrificial meat to our restaurants,” Iqbal said. “Allah has given us the taste that attracts people.”

Customer Mustafa Tahir said offering guests a mix of homemade dishes and food prepared by restaurants created a good balance during Eid. 

“Have them [restaurants] prepare dishes too, they’ll make good food,” he said. “Combine three or four flavours, invite guests at home, and truly enjoy Eid-Al-Adha as it should be enjoyed.”


In picturesque Saidpur village, nearly 60-year-old goat market is go-to on Eid and beyond

In picturesque Saidpur village, nearly 60-year-old goat market is go-to on Eid and beyond
Updated 17 min 12 sec ago
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In picturesque Saidpur village, nearly 60-year-old goat market is go-to on Eid and beyond

In picturesque Saidpur village, nearly 60-year-old goat market is go-to on Eid and beyond
  • Traders raise goats throughout the year at market in 500-year-old Saidpur village to sell during Eid Al-Adha holiday and beyond 
  • Unlike other cattle markets specifically set up ahead of Eid, the Saidpur bazaar is busy even during and after the religious festival 

ISLAMABAD: Underneath a large canopy in the luscious Margalla Hills of Islamabad, the sound of goats munching on dried grass and hay filled the air earlier this month as eager buyers jostled around them.

This is Islamabad’s famous goat, lamb and sheep market in the 500-year-old Mughal-era Saidpur village, famous for its cobblestone streets, ancient temples, handicraft stores and quaint eateries.

But before, during and after the Muslim holiday of Eid Al-Adha, Saidpur is also the go-to for anyone in the market for the best quality goats and sheep. 

Traders set up shop here in large tents around the year but ahead of the annual Eid Al-Adha holiday, hordes of buyers frequent the market in search of the cattle of their choice. 

“During Eid days, most of the work happens in 4-5 days, a few days before Eid, then on Eid day and during Hajj,” Malik Naseer, a trader at the market, told Arab News. “In four days, god willing, we are able to sell up to 300 animals.”

Customers check the weight of a goat at a livestock market in Islamabad on June 14, 2024, ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha. (AFP/File)

Unlike other cattle markets specifically set up ahead of Eid in Islamabad and other cities in Pakistan, the Saidpur bazaar is busy throughout the year and even during and after Eid.

“After Eid sacrifice, people buy goats for charity, to cook at home, for weddings,” a resident of the area, Chaudhry Yamin, said. “Almost all the residents of Islamabad purchase goats from here. You can get good animals from here and get them cheaper also compared to other markets. And its also close [to residential areas].”

“AS OLD AS ISLAMABAD”

Trader Malik Jahangir said the market was as old as Islamabad itself. 

“We have been in this business for the last 60 to 65 years,” he told Arab News as a customer inspected a goat at Jahangir’s tent. “Since the establishment of Islamabad [in 1967], we have been providing animals to the people of the city for their benefit.” 

Customers check the weight of a goat at a livestock market in Islamabad on June 14, 2024, ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid Al-Adha. (AFP)

Goats at the Saidpur market are brought there from various Pakistani cities such as Bahawalpur, Talagang, Khushab, Swat and the Azad Kashmir region and different breeds come with different price tags. 

And raising them is an expensive affair, Jahangir said, as feed alone cost Rs200-300 [$0.72-1.08] daily. 

But prices this year were still lower than previous years, he contended, with the consumer price index (CPI) in May rising 11.8 percent from a year earlier, the lowest reading in 30 months and below the finance ministry’s projections.

“Previously, people were selling at around Rs. 1400 to Rs. 1500 ($5) per kilogram but this year we are selling at Rs. 1200 to Rs. 1300 ($4.5) per kilogram,” Jahangir said. 

Customers disagreed about the low prices. 

“The traders are good here as they bring goats from regular markets to sell here and we have a good experience here but this time I am feeling that prices are very high,” customer Khalid Paracha said. 

“As meat rates are also high and animal prices are also high, we have come here on two visits but not been able to make a deal.”


On Eid Al-Adha, animal accessories are all the rage 

On Eid Al-Adha, animal accessories are all the rage 
Updated 17 June 2024
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On Eid Al-Adha, animal accessories are all the rage 

On Eid Al-Adha, animal accessories are all the rage 
  • Animal traders decorate bulls, lambs and goats to make them stand out and fetch higher prices
  • Customers buy animals, then purchase anklets, bells and colorful collars from decoration stalls

ISLAMABAD: Ashraf Khan picked up a colorful anklet and showed it to a customer from a range of collars, beads, bells and other ornaments at his stall of animal accessories at the Sangjani cattle market on the outskirts of the Pakistani capital of Islamabad.

The 33-year-old, who sets up a makeshift stall at the market every year, said the demand for animal accessories went up just as the demand for animals and their prices surged ahead of the major Islamic festival, marked by devout Muslims by slaughtering animals and sharing the meat with family and the poor.

Khan, who has been selling animal accessories for the last several years, said his clients not only included members of the public, but also traders who wanted to adorn their cows, sheep and bulls before putting them up for sale in order to better attract customers and fetch higher prices.

“We receive goats, lambs and bulls [at our decoration stall],” Ashraf said. “It takes Rs1,000 to Rs1,500 ($3-5) to decorate a goat with different types of materials. Decorating bulls ranges from Rs2,000 to Rs2,500 ($7-8).”

The 33-year-old sources ornaments from Islamabad’s twin city of Rawalpindi and sets up his stall in the Sangjani capital market a week before Eid.

“The price tag depends on the number and quality of items,” Khan said. 

Naik Muhammad, who brought 50 lambs to sell at Sangjani market, said a lamb cost him around Rs25,000 ($90) this year and he was looking to sell it for between Rs85,000 to Rs95,000 ($305-$341).

“The purpose of decoration is that customers like them more and the rates get better,” Muhammad said. “When customers like the animal then we can ask rates of our choice.”

Alamgir Khan, a fruit vendor in Islamabad, purchased a lamb for Rs77,500 ($278) after haggling with sellers for around three hours and brought it to Khan’s stall to buy accessories for decoration.

“We have spent some money on its decoration to make it look beautiful and then the children at home will see it and be happy, and that is a rewarding thing,” Alamgir told Arab News. “This is an animal for sacrifice, it should be adorned.”


Pakistan among big nuclear arms spenders amid swelling global tensions — studies

Pakistan among big nuclear arms spenders amid swelling global tensions — studies
Updated 17 June 2024
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Pakistan among big nuclear arms spenders amid swelling global tensions — studies

Pakistan among big nuclear arms spenders amid swelling global tensions — studies
  • Spending for 2023 by the nuclear-armed states jumped more than 33 percent from the $68.2 billion spent in 2018
  • SIPRI says “we have not seen nuclear weapons playing such a prominent role in international relations since Cold War”

GENEVA: Nuclear-armed countries hiked spending on atomic weapons arsenals by a third in the past five years as they modernized their stockpiles amid growing geopolitical tensions, two reports showed on Monday.

The world’s nine nuclear-armed states jointly spent $91 billion on their arsenals last year, according to a new report from the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN).

That report, and a separate one from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), indicated that nuclear weapons states are dramatically scaling up spending as they modernize and even deploy new nuclear-armed weapons.

“I think it is fair to say there is a nuclear arms race under way,” ICAN chief Melissa Parke told AFP.

Wilfred Wan, head of SIPRI’s weapons of mass destruction program, meanwhile warned in a statement that “we have not seen nuclear weapons playing such a prominent role in international relations since the Cold War.”

SIPRI’s report showed that the total estimated number of nuclear warheads in the world actually declined somewhat to 12,121 at the start of this year, from 12,512 a year earlier.

But while some of that included older warheads scheduled to be dismantled, it said 9,585 were in stockpiles for potential use — nine more than a year earlier.

And 2,100 were kept in a state of “high operational alert” on ballistic missiles.

Nearly all of those were held by the United States and Russia, but China was for the first time believed to also have some warheads on high operational alert, SIPRI said.

“While the global total of nuclear warheads continues to fall as Cold War-era weapons are gradually dismantled, regrettably we continue to see year-on-year increases in the number of operational nuclear warheads,” SIPRI director Dan Smith said.

The spending surge reported by ICAN appeared to back that up.

The report showed that in 2023 alone, nuclear weapons spending worldwide jumped by $10.8 billion from a year earlier, with the United States accounting for 80 percent of that increase.

The US share of total spending, $51.5 billion, “is more than all the other nuclear-armed countries put together,” said ICAN.

The next biggest spender was China, at $11.8 billion, followed by Russia, spending $8.3 billion.

Britain’s spending meanwhile rose significantly for the second year in a row, swelling 17 percent to $8.1 billion.

Spending for 2023 by the nuclear-armed states — which also include France, India, Israel, Pakistan and North Korea — jumped more than 33 percent from the $68.2 billion spent in 2018, when ICAN first began collecting this data, it said.

Since then, the nuclear armed states have spent an estimated total of $387 billion on the deadly weapons, the report showed.

Parke slammed “the billions of dollars being squandered on nuclear weapons” as “a profound and unacceptable misallocation of public funds.”

She highlighted that that money was more than what the World Food Programme estimates is needed to end world hunger.

“And you could plant a million trees for every minute of nuclear weapons spending,” she said.

“These numbers are obscene, and it is money that the state says is going toward weapons that... will never be used,” she said, pointing to the nuclear deterrence doctrine.

The investments are not only wasteful but also extremely dangerous, she warned.

“What happens when deterrence fails?“

Geneva-based ICAN won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize for its key role in drafting the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which took effect in 2021.

Seventy countries have ratified it to date and more have signed it, although none of the nuclear weapons states have come on board.

“Instead of investing in Armageddon, the nine nuclear-armed states should follow the example of almost half the world’s countries and join the treaty... and make a real contribution to global security,” said Alicia Sanders-Zakre, a co-author of Monday’s ICAN report.