Saudi Arabia, Russia sign strategic oil pact

Updated 05 September 2016

Saudi Arabia, Russia sign strategic oil pact

HANGZHOU: The world's two largest oil producers, Russia and Saudi Arabia, on Monday agreed to act together to stabilize global oil output.
Energy ministers Alexander Novak and Minister Khalid Al-Falih met Monday on the sidelines of the Group of 20 nations' summit in China. A joint statement released by Russia said both ministers "recognized the need to restrain an excessive volatility of the oil market" and agreed to act together "in order to stabilize the oil market."
“Of course, strategic works with Russia will be important given that they are one of the two largest producers of oil along with the Kingdom. There is no doubt that Saudi Arabia to see OPEC and non-OPEC countries to follow our lead in joining this strategic working group,” Saudi Arabia’s Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih.
Novak and Al-Falih said they would chair the first Russia-Saudi task force on oil and gas in October.


Translation: "The Ministries of Energy in both countries will work collectively to exchange technologies and develop the petroleum industry in both countries" — Khalid Al-Falih

Russia, which is not a member of the oil producing nations' group OPEC, this year supported calls to freeze production, but the efforts fell through after OPEC member Iran opposed the plan.
“Both Russia and Saudi Arabia, as the two largest oil producers in the world, have the heaviest burdens to see the oil markets stabilize,” Novak said.
Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates welcomed the agreement by Saudi Arabia and Russia to try jointly to stabilise oil prices.
Kuwait "welcomes the consultations between Saudi Arabia and Russia about oil markets... and backs the outcome of these consultations for the sake of achieving a balance in the markets", acting oil minister Anas al-Saleh told the official KUNA news agency.


US to extend license for its companies to continue business with Huawei

Updated 28 min 5 sec ago

US to extend license for its companies to continue business with Huawei

  • A longer extension is in the works but has not yet been finalized due to regulatory hurdles

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is set to issue a two-week extension of a license allowing US companies to continue doing business with China’s Huawei Technologies, two sources familiar with the deliberations said.

The extension of around two weeks is far shorter than the prior 90-day extension and a longer extension is in the works but has not yet been finalized due to regulatory hurdles, said one source who was briefed on the matter.

After adding Huawei to an economic blacklist in May citing national security concerns, the US Commerce Department has allowed it to purchase some American-made goods in a move aimed at minimizing disruption for its customers, many of which operate networks in rural America.

The extension will be announced on Monday, when the earlier reprieve is set to expire, the sources said, declining to be identified as the extension has not been publicly announced.

A spokesman for Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of telecom network equipment, said the company does not comment on rumors and speculation. The Commerce Department declined to comment.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • US added Huawei to an economic blacklist in May citing national security concerns.
  • The Commerce Department is also considering whether to grant individual licenses for US firms to sell components to Huawei.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross told Fox Business Network on Friday that some rural carriers need the temporary licenses and are dependent on Huawei for 3G and 4G networks.

“There are enough problems with telephone service in the rural communities — we don’t want to knock them out. So, one of the main purposes of the temporary general licenses is to let those rural guys continue to operate,” Ross said.

The development comes amid discussions between the US and China aimed at coming to an initial agreement to resolve a trade war that has lasted for over a year.

In blacklisting Huawei, the US government said it had a “reasonable basis to conclude that Huawei is engaged in activities that are contrary to US national security or foreign policy interests.” Huawei has repeatedly denied the accusations.

Attorney General William Barr said on Thursday Huawei and ZTE Corp. “cannot be trusted,” as he backed a proposal to bar US rural wireless carriers from tapping an $8.5 billion government fund to purchase equipment or services from them.

In May, President Donald Trump also signed an executive order declaring a national emergency and barring US companies from using telecommunications equipment made by companies posing a national security risk. The Commerce Department was due to draw up an enforcement plan by mid-October but has yet to publish one.

The Commerce Department is also considering whether to grant individual licenses for US firms to sell components to Huawei after receiving more than 200 requests.