Space collisions could rise due to more CO2

Updated 16 November 2012

Space collisions could rise due to more CO2

LONDON: More satellites and orbiting debris could collide in the upper atmosphere because a buildup of carbon dioxide (CO2) has reduced the “drag effect” which can eventually send some space junk back down to Earth, a study shows.
Over the past eight years CO2 concentrations in the upper atmosphere have risen from burning fossil fuels that have warmed the Earth’s surface and caused temperatures to increase, the study in the journal Nature Geoscience said.
This can result in a cooler, less dense atmosphere above a 90-km (55-mile) altitude, the study said, adding that this “will reduce atmospheric drag on satellites and may have adverse consequences for the orbital debris environment that is already unstable.”
Less drag, or friction, in the upper atmosphere means space debris such as redundant satellites and defunct rocket bodies will stay at a certain altitude for longer, increasing the risk of collisions.
Global temperatures are now about 0.8 degree C (1.4 F) above pre-industrial times. Two degrees is viewed as a threshold to dangerous change including more powerful storms like Sandy that struck the United States this month, more heatwaves, droughts and rising sea levels.
The scientists, from the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, Old Dominion University in Virginia, University of Waterloo in Ontario and the University of York in Britain, used satellite data to study changes in CO2 concentrations at a 101-km altitude between 2004 and 2012 and found that CO2 rose significantly over that time.
So far, CO2 trends have been measured only up to a 35-km altitude because balloons and aircraft do not reach high altitudes, and ground measurements and rockets only provide limited coverage.
Debris is always a danger to spacecraft and collisions can prove costly for spacecraft manufacturers.
There are 21,000 bits of debris larger than 10 cm (4 inches) in orbit, but collisions occur infrequently — about once a year on average, according to NASA, the US space agency.
However, a US National Research Council report in 2011 warned NASA that the amount of space debris orbiting the Earth was at critical level and the United States has been trying to develop technologies to remove debris and reduce hazards.


10-year-old Bangladeshi’s communication app creates buzz

Updated 20 January 2020

10-year-old Bangladeshi’s communication app creates buzz

  • “I thought we should have something of our own, which inspired me to start working on my communication app”: Ayman Al-Anam

DHAKA: A Bangladeshi fifth-grader’s new communication app — Lita Free Video Calls and Chat — has created a huge buzz among local internet users. Already, 10,500 people have downloaded the app from the Google Play Store since Saturday.

Ayman Al-Anam submitted the app to Google on Dec. 27. After scrutiny and manual verification, Google uploaded the app on its Play Store on Dec. 31.

 “Currently, Bangladeshi internet users are mostly dependent on apps like WhatsApp, Viber and Imo for communication overseas,” Al-Anam told Arab News.

“I thought we should have something of our own, which inspired me to start working on my communication app.”

It took the 10-year-old 10 months to create the app, which he said he accomplished by himself, without the help of any mentor. “I learned the process through different YouTube tutorials. The rest was just trial and error,” he added.

 The app provides better-quality, high-definition video calls to its users. It also works for transferring big data in a shorter amount of time compared to similar apps.

Al-Anam’s success at such an early age has surprised his parents. “From a very early age, my son had a knack for technology, and I encouraged him to pursue it. He used to spend his free time in front of computers, smartphones and other devices,” said proud father Tauhedush Salam Nishad. “I always supported him, but I never dreamed that he’d see this sort of success so young.”

Recalling the first successful test run of the new app, Nishad said: “One night, I returned home from work and Ayman took my smartphone and installed the raw file of the app. Later, he did the same with his mother’s phone and connected the two devices with a video call. It was the best moment in his life. He shouted with joy, ‘I did it!’” 

Al-Anam named the app after his mother Lita. The young inventor is currently studying at South Point School and College in Chattogram, 248 km from the capital. He dreams of becoming a software engineer and wants to work at Google headquarters.

His creation has drawn much attention from local experts. “We should nurture this sort of extraordinary talent very carefully,” Prof. Mohammad Kaikobad of the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology told Arab News.

 “This new generation will lead the technology world of tomorrow if they’re guided and encouraged properly.”