Woman sues US police over hijab

Updated 02 July 2015

Woman sues US police over hijab

DEARBORN, Michigan: A Muslim woman is suing a Michigan police department, saying her rights were violated when she was ordered to remove a headscarf for a mugshot after her arrest.
Maha Aldhalimi was told that she was wanted for an unpaid parking violation. She says she was ordered to remove the headscarf, known as hijab, for a photo at the Dearborn Police Department last September.
Aldhalimi says she was crying while explaining that removing the scarf in front of male strangers would violate her religious beliefs. She says she finally agreed to remove it under threat.
Lawyers for Aldhalimi filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Detroit federal court, accusing Dearborn police of violating federal law. The city declined to comment.
Dearborn has one of the largest populations of Arab-Americans in the country.


Pakistan influence over Taliban can help, envoy says

Updated 9 min 27 sec ago

Pakistan influence over Taliban can help, envoy says

  • Progress of talks has been slow and rising violence has sapped trust

ISLAMABAD: The Afghan President’s Special Envoy for Pakistan Mohammed Umer Daudzai said on Wednesday that Pakistan should use its influence over the Taliban to help break a deadlock in peace talks between the insurgent group and Kabul, but warned that Islamabad should push the Taliban to support democracy.
Talks between an Afghan government delegation and the Taliban have been ongoing in Doha since mid-September, but progress has been slow and rising violence has sapped trust.
According to the UN, nearly 6,000 Afghan civilians have been killed or wounded in the first nine months of the year as heavy fighting between government forces and Taliban insurgents rages on despite efforts to find peace.
The peace talks follow a deal in February between the USs and the Taliban that will pave the way for foreign forces to leave Afghanistan by May 2021 in exchange for counterterrorism guarantees from the Taliban, who agreed to negotiate a permanent ceasefire and a power-sharing formula with Kabul.
“We are pleased at the agreement between the Taliban and the US; it has proved that Pakistan has influence on the Taliban,” Daudzai told Arab News.
“Since they have influence, so they should also help us. This is our expectation. Pakistan has not refused to help us. They have also not denied their influence (on the Taliban).”
Neighboring Pakistan’s role in Afghanistan has for years been ambiguous — it is a US ally but is also accused of supporting the Taliban as its proxy in Afghanistan, part of its wider jockeying with regional rival India. Islamabad denies this. It also insists its influence with the Taliban has waned over the years.
“Pakistani leaders know our position as what do we want, what do we expect from them. But when and how will they do that is up to them.
But we want urgent actions,” Daudzai said, adding that the Afghan government expected Pakistan to support democracy in Afghanistan.
He said Prime Minister Imran Khan would hold “detailed discussions” on the peace process with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani when they met in Kabul later this year.