Muslims protest in Delhi against Rohingyas killings

Updated 11 April 2013

Muslims protest in Delhi against Rohingyas killings

Indian Muslim organizations and human rights bodies protested against the atrocities and cruel activities being meted out against Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar.
The protest organized by All India Muslim Majlis-e-Mushawarat condemned the Myanmar government for its inaction to stop violence against Rohingya Muslims in the Rakhine (Arakan) state.
The protest was to be staged in front of Myanmar Embassy in Nyay Marg, but Delhi police stopped the protesters at Teen Morti Marg near Chankyapuri police station.
The persecution of Rohingyas started way back in the 1960s. In 1982, under a strange law, they were stripped of their Burmese citizenship, as they had to prove that their ancestors lived in Burma way back in 1832.
“No such law exists anywhere in the world and most Burmese will lose their citizenship if applied on all people in the country,” said one protester.
Rohingyas have lived in that part of Burma continuously for around a thousand years and have ruled the area for centuries. As a result of this persecution and maintaining curfew-like situation in Rohingya towns and villages, close to a million have fled to the neighboring countries especially Bangladesh. The current wave of persecution and ethnic cleansing spearheaded by Buddhist monks started in February last year when murder, destruction and torching of thousands of houses and community facilities and expulsion of Rohingyas from their villages started with the connivance of the Burmese government. An estimated 150,000 Rohingyas have since fled their country taking refuge in Bangladesh, India, Thailand and Malaysia where they live in pitiful conditions. Many have died while attempting to flee in small boats.
“We find it highly disappointing that supporters of the on-going democracy process in Myanmar, led by the Nobel Laureate Ang San SuuKyi, have refused to stand for these hapless citizens of Burma. We condemn the inaction by the Myanmar government and ask our own government as well as the international community to stand by the Rohingya people in their hour of need and pressure the Myanmar junta to mend its ways and apply to the Rohingyas same principles which are applied to other citizens,” said Mohammad Ahmad, secretary-general of Jamaat-e-Islami Hind.
Meanwhile, JIH expressed concern over conviction of Bangladesh Jamaat leaders for alleged 1971 war crimes without giving them full opportunity to defend.
Sheikh Mujibur Rahman had withdrawn all the cases against them by declaring general amnesty.
Jamaat appealed to international organizations including the Non-Aligned Movement, SAARC and Organization of Islamic Cooperation to pressure Bangladesh government to stop its oppressive practices against Jamaat leaders.


India coronavirus cases pass 6 million

Updated 10 min 3 sec ago

India coronavirus cases pass 6 million

  • India could leapfrog the US in the coming weeks
  • Narendra Modi has called on people to keep wearing face coverings when they ventured outside of their homes

NEW DELHI: India reported its six millionth coronavirus case on Monday as it surged closer to the United States as the most-infected nation, and authorities pressed ahead with reigniting the economy.
The vast nation is home to 1.3 billion people, some of humanity’s most densely populated cities and a feeble health care system, and for several weeks it has reported around 90,000 new cases daily — the highest in the world.
Health ministry data showed a rise of 82,000 cases on Monday, taking the total to 6.1 million and closing the gap on the United States, which has recorded 7.1 million infections. India could leapfrog the US in the coming weeks.
India has a much lower death rate than other worst-hit nations with almost 100,000 fatalities so far — fewer than half the grisly toll of 205,000 recorded in the US, which has roughly a quarter of the population. Brazil has meanwhile recorded 140,000 deaths.
Prime Minister Narendra Modi has called on people to keep wearing face coverings when they ventured outside of their homes.
“These rules are weapons in the war against corona. They are potent tools to save the life of every citizen,” Modi said during his monthly radio address on Sunday.
The virus initially hit major metropolises including financial hub Mumbai and capital New Delhi, but has since spread to regional and rural areas where health care systems are even more fragile and patchy.
“In several of the pockets where the transmission is active, the infection has gone into the community,” former national health secretary Sujatha Rao said.
“It is difficult to control transmission in such situations and a dramatic turnaround can perhaps be possible only through a rigorous implementation of a lockdown and preventive measures like mask wearing.”
The government is unlikely to reimpose major restrictions after a lockdown in March battered the economy and wrecked the livelihoods of millions of people, particularly the poor.
Some schools have now reopened, and trains, metros, domestic flights, markets and restaurants have been allowed to operate with some restrictions. The Taj Mahal also opened again for tourists this month.
Anand Krishnan, a community medicine professor at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) in Delhi, said authorities should focus on treating people who contract the virus.
“The only thing that we can do is take care of people who are ill — identify them faster and treat them better. And follow the social-distancing norms,” he said.
“Beyond that, I don’t think there is anything specific that can be done.”
Some locals in Delhi said that while they remained cautious, their worries about the pandemic had lessened since the start of the year.
“I’m out of the house all day because of my work. I don’t step out of the house for anything else,” said 23-year-old medical store worker Umang Chutani.
“The future is uncertain but one can only be cautious and follow all safety protocols.”
Himanshu Kainthola, 61, who recovered from the virus last month after testing positive with two other relatives, said his family’s fears “have reduced substantially.”
“We have made peace with it. We take the necessary precautions and invest in increasing our immunity rather than being anxious or scared of it.”
Creative writing student Santosh added that the virus was now “part of our lives.”
“You cannot shutdown every business, because the economy cannot collapse... COVID-19 is not going to pay the rent,” he said.