IILM reshuffles Shariah board

Updated 23 July 2013

IILM reshuffles Shariah board

KUALA LUMPUR/SYDNEY: The Malaysia-based International Islamic Liquidity Management Corp. (IILM) has reshuffled its Shariah board, losing four of its original six members including senior Saudi and Qatari scholars, according to the body's website.
The IILM, backed by the central banks of nine countries as well as the Jeddah-based Islamic Development Bank, was founded in October 2010 to help develop cross-border markets in Islamic financial instruments.
But it has been troubled by internal management upheaval — it changed its chief executive late last year — and the surprise pullout in April this year of Saudi Arabia's central bank.
The changes to the Shariah board, which monitors the IILM's activities and instruments to ensure that they follow Islamic principles, could indicate further delays to the body's plan to begin issuing sukuk.
The IILM announced in April that it aimed to make an initial issue worth up to $500 million in the second quarter of this year but has not yet proceeded with the plan, and it has not given a new time frame for it.
The body did not issue a statement on the changes to its Shariah board, which were merely listed on the personnel section of its website. It did not respond to Reuters questions about the changes. According to a December 2010 press release, the Shariah board members were to serve three-year terms.


Two Saudi scholars are no longer listed as members of the IILM Shariah board, including Mohamed Ali Elgari, a prominent expert who sits on over 80 Shariah boards around the world. Elgari's office did not respond to Reuters questions.
Ahmed Ali Abdalla Hamad is the other Saudi scholar no longer listed; he serves as vice-chairman on the Shariah board of Saudi Arabia's Al Rajhi Bank, the world's largest Islamic bank by assets.
The departures also include Qatari-born Waleed Bin Hady Al Mullah, chairman of the Shariah boards of Qatar Islamic Bank and Masraf Al Rayan, two of the Gulf Arab state's largest Islamic lenders.
Of the original members of the IILM's Shariah board, formed in 2010, only two scholars from Nigeria and Malaysia remain. They have now been joined by scholars from Indonesia and Kuwait; currently the board consists of four members.
It is unclear exactly when the reshuffle occurred, but Indonesian scholar Cecep Hakim's profile on LinkedIn, an online service for business networking, shows he left the Shariah board in April this year, roughly coinciding with Saudi Arabia's exit from the IILM.
The IILM's internal Shariah coordinator, Edib Smolo from Bosnia, left the body in March this year, according to his LinkedIn profile. He declined to comment. The Shariah coordinator does not sit on the Shariah board but works with it to design and structure transactions, do research and perform other tasks.
The planned sukuk issue by the IILM would be part of a program that could eventually expand to $3 billion, and would be a major step in developing Islamic finance globally; it aims to address a shortage of liquid, investment-grade instruments which Islamic banks can trade across borders.
The IILM has not explained why it has taken so long since 2010 to develop the sukuk program. People familiar with the body have said it has encountered complex issues involving regulation in various jurisdictions and the choice of assets to back the sukuk.
Current shareholders in the IILM are the central banks and monetary agencies of Indonesia, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nigeria, Qatar, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates, as well as the IDB, according to its website.


Dubai launches economic program for post COVID-19 recovery 

Updated 05 August 2020

Dubai launches economic program for post COVID-19 recovery 

  • “The Great Economic Reset Programme” is part of a “COVID Exit initiative” to help the recovery and reshaping of the economy
  • The economic program will feature analyses of current and future policies

DUBAI: Dubai launched an economic program as part of its efforts to reshape the emirate’s economy for a “sustainable” and “resilient” future post the coronavirus pandemic, the government said. 
The Dubai government partnered with the Mohammed bin Rashid School of Government (MBRSG) to launch “The Great Economic Reset Programme” as part of a “COVID Exit initiative” to help the recovery and reshaping of the economy, state news agency WAM reported on Tuesday. 
The economic program will feature analyses of current and future policies, research and extensive stakeholder consultation to set the direction and tone of future economic policies, regulations and initiatives.
The government plans to use local and international experts for economies and societies to create growth strategies for the Dubai economy.
The MBRSG held a “Virtual Policy Council,” with global experts and thought leaders to discuss the impacts of COVID-19 on the economy and potential policy responses and initiatives. 
Chief economists, senior practitioners and researchers from leading global institutions including the World Bank, joined experts from Dubai Economy and the MBRSG at the first roundtable.
“I believe the triple helix collaboration between public, private and academia stakeholders have always produced the best solutions in the past. In the highly uncertain environment now, extensive collaboration and cooperation between all stakeholders are vital to our future prosperity. The Virtual Policy Council will propose the best approaches Dubai and the UAE can adopt to address the risks and opportunities in the next normal economy,” said Mohammed Shael Al-Saadi, CEO of the Corporate Strategic Affairs sector in Dubai Economy.
“This Virtual Policy Council is a key component of the whole process where global experts and thinkers share their views on the future economy. In this new era, the role of governments in enabling the new economic actors is becoming increasingly central, and Dubai is well-positioned to lead the way with innovative models of growth post COVID19,” said Professor Raed Awamleh, Dean of MBRSG.
The roundtable also discussed the impact of the pandemic on international trade, foreign investment and tourism, as well as the rise of digital globalization.