Women’s IDs can be issued without guardians’ consent

Updated 12 August 2013

Women’s IDs can be issued without guardians’ consent

There are several ways women can obtain their national identity card without seeking their guardians’ permission, according to Khalid Fakhri, member of the National Assembly for Human Rights.
Fakhri said the guardians’ role is to identify and facilitate statutory procedures for women provided that they are included in family records.
He said that procedures and rules are clear regarding women’s rights to obtain a national ID and apply for paperwork to be completed at any department with the exception of proceedings in civil cases.
Current regulations within the civil status system give women several options for obtaining their national IDs. This includes the presence of a guardian for identification purposes via signed family records. If this is not possible, she can submit the ID of a relative aged 18 years or older, or, if this is also not possible, two women aged 18 or older can come to the Department of Civil Status to complete statutory procedures.
These are all viable and acceptable methods for a woman to obtain her ID for civil cases without requiring the consent or presence of the guardian. Women also have the freedom to select who will facilitate obtaining the national ID.
But the presence of a guardian is intended only for identification purposes to facilitate the procedures.
The guardian does not have the right to refuse because being recognized through an ID is a fundamental right and conforms to procedures in place in many countries for security considerations and other services.


Saudi minister hails ‘special relationship’ with Japan

Updated 14 min 10 sec ago

Saudi minister hails ‘special relationship’ with Japan

  • “We share common values,” said Majid Al-Qasabi

TOKYO: Saudi Arabia has a “special relationship” with Japan, which is “reliable strategic partner and friend” of the Kingdom, the Saudi Minister for Commerce and Investment Majid Al-Qasabi said on Monday.

The minister was speaking at the launch in Tokyo of the Japanese-language online edition of Arab News, in the latest stage of its global expansion. The event came on the eve of Tuesday’s ceremonial enthronement of Emperor Naruhito in the Japanese capital. “This is a great opportunity, a moment in history,” Al-Qasabi said.

The news website, published in Japanese and English, will focus on enabling the exchange of information between Japan and the Arab world in business, current affairs, and arts and culture. “It will be good to have news in Japanese so many Japanese can read about the Arab world,” Japan’s Defense Minister Taro Kono said at the launch.

Common values

“We share common values, we have a high respect for the elders and we think that the family is very important … to me we are friends and I think we need to work together.

“In order to do that we need to know what people in the Middle East are actually thinking, what is happening on a daily basis, and we haven’t got the source for that — but now Arab News is in Japan.

“This is a very good means to exchange information between the Middle East and Japan, so I am very much looking forward to it.”