Retweeters of offensive tweets face same punishment

Updated 12 February 2014

Retweeters of offensive tweets face same punishment

A prominent legal consultant has warned that Twitter users who retweet abusive or offensive tweets will be liable to the same punishment as the original posters of such remarks.
Humoud Al-Khaldi said that penal action would be taken against offenders in compliance with Article 6 of the Anti-Cyber Crime Law, which stipulates that anyone involved in the production, transmission or storage of material infringing on public order, religious values or privacy would be sentenced to a maximum of five years in prison or a maximum fine of SR3 million or face both forms of punishment.
“Computer crime that takes place on Twitter, a leading social networking site that is used widely, poses a threat to the cohesion of the social fabric of society. Many have exploited Twitter to propagate false ideas and aberrant practices that many have fallen victim to, disregarding the moral and ethical values of our society, religion and traditions,” Al-Khaldi said.
“Hundreds of users posting anonymously or under fictitious names speak on issues which they are ignorant of, making judgmental remarks and instigating unrest,” said Al-Khaldi.
“This reinforces the importance of implementing strict laws to prevent such forms of cyber crime from taking place on Saudi and Gulf soil,” said Al-Khaldi.
He explained that one such initiative is the adoption and approval of a uniform code for ensuring cyber security in GCC countries.
“Social media is supposed to be a place for sharing stories, ideas and opinions. This kind of cyber crime will make users think twice before re-posting,” said Ahmed Abdulmajeed, a Twitter user.


Condemnation of attacks on Saudi Aramco oil plants continue

Updated 17 September 2019

Condemnation of attacks on Saudi Aramco oil plants continue

  • Bahraini King calls Saudi leadership

RIYADH: Condemnations of Saturday’s attack on Saudi Aramco oil installations continued on Monday, as the US pointed out Iran as the likely culprit behind the drone strikes that have dramatically escalated tensions in the region and triggered a record leap in global oil prices.

King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman both received calls from the King Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa of Bahrain to condemn the attacks at Saudi oil facilities in Abqaiq and Khurais.

US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper called the crown prince, who is also the defense minister, to affirm his country's full support for the Kingdom.

British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said, “We will work with international partners to forge the widest and most effective response,” with a statement from his ministry saying the “UK remains committed to supporting the security of Saudi Arabia.”

India also slammed the attacks and reiterated the country’s “rejection of terrorism in all its forms and manifestations,” a foreign ministry spokesman said.

Official Spokesperson of the UN Secretary General Stephane Dujarric said in a statement that the Secretary General condemns Saturday's attacks on two Aramco oil plants.

The German Foreign Ministry spokeswoman said, “Such an attack on civilian and vital infrastructure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is not justified”.

— with SPA