Retweeters of offensive tweets face same punishment

Updated 12 February 2014

Retweeters of offensive tweets face same punishment

A prominent legal consultant has warned that Twitter users who retweet abusive or offensive tweets will be liable to the same punishment as the original posters of such remarks.
Humoud Al-Khaldi said that penal action would be taken against offenders in compliance with Article 6 of the Anti-Cyber Crime Law, which stipulates that anyone involved in the production, transmission or storage of material infringing on public order, religious values or privacy would be sentenced to a maximum of five years in prison or a maximum fine of SR3 million or face both forms of punishment.
“Computer crime that takes place on Twitter, a leading social networking site that is used widely, poses a threat to the cohesion of the social fabric of society. Many have exploited Twitter to propagate false ideas and aberrant practices that many have fallen victim to, disregarding the moral and ethical values of our society, religion and traditions,” Al-Khaldi said.
“Hundreds of users posting anonymously or under fictitious names speak on issues which they are ignorant of, making judgmental remarks and instigating unrest,” said Al-Khaldi.
“This reinforces the importance of implementing strict laws to prevent such forms of cyber crime from taking place on Saudi and Gulf soil,” said Al-Khaldi.
He explained that one such initiative is the adoption and approval of a uniform code for ensuring cyber security in GCC countries.
“Social media is supposed to be a place for sharing stories, ideas and opinions. This kind of cyber crime will make users think twice before re-posting,” said Ahmed Abdulmajeed, a Twitter user.


Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

Updated 06 June 2020

Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

MADINAH: Hundreds of thousands of worshippers attended the first Friday prayers to be held at the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah since the gatherings were suspended to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The green light for the resumption of the prayer meetings came as part of a plan to gradually reopen the Kingdom’s mosques while ensuring worshippers and visitors adhered to preventive measures.

A ban on access to the Rawdah remained in place and only groups of worshippers numbering up to a maximum of 40 percent of the mosque’s capacity were being allowed entry.

Precautionary measures also included the allocation of specific doors for the entry of worshippers, the installation of thermal cameras, removal of all carpets so that prayers could be performed on the marble, sanitization of the mosque’s floors and courtyards, periodic opening of domes and canopies to ventilate the mosque, and the removal of Zamzam water containers.

The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah will be closed after evening prayers and reopened one hour before dawn prayers. Parking lots will operate at 50 percent capacity and a media awareness campaign has been launched to highlight safety procedures at the holy site.

Medical teams have also been stationed at the main entrances to the mosque in cooperation with the Ministry of Health.

Elsewhere in the Kingdom, worshippers also flocked to perform Friday prayers at mosques amid strict health measures.

On May 31, Saudi authorities reopened all mosques for prayers, except in Makkah, as part of the Kingdom’s plan for a gradual return to normal life.

Last week the minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance said that the country’s mosques were ready to welcome back worshippers, following his field trips to check that necessary preparations had been made.

All worshippers must still maintain a distance of 2 meters between rows, wear masks to enter a mosque, and Friday sermons and prayers have been limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.