Women from broken homes more prone to domestic abuse

Updated 29 May 2014

Women from broken homes more prone to domestic abuse

Women who have not been brought up by their biological parents are more prone to domestic violence if they marry men from similar sociological backgrounds, said experts.
This, many have said, is due to the fact that these women do not have families that can intervene and protect them.
Many women have since demanded special laws to address social problems related to divorce and alimony.
One such victim of abuse recounted her ordeal to local media.
“Two years ago, I married a young man who had also lived in a shelter like myself with no parents or next of kin,” she said.
“I soon found myself getting beaten up everyday until one day, he broke my jaw. I reported the incident to the Social Affairs Department, who referred me for treatment.”
The bruised and battered woman now lives in a furnished apartment that costs SR2,700 monthly in rent, which is is paid by the department.
“I filed for divorce 18 months ago and a supervising committee is currently following up on my case,” she said.
“I fail to understand why there are no special laws to shield us from violence considering we have no family or parents to protect us.”
“Women who have grown up in government shelters need even more protection after they get married,” said another domestic abuse victim.
The woman, who had suffered minor fractures, told local media: “When we get married to men that come from broken homes like us, we become more vulnerable to domestic violence because these men suffer from negative self-image that translates into violence and insubordination.”
“Children are often at the receiving end of such violence and self-loathing,” she said.
“No one knows of the circumstances we live in or the daily violence we face. I approached a human rights body, but they were unresponsive. The Social Affairs Department only provides financial in the form of rent, but we have to earn our living ourselves.”
She appealed to the Minister of Social Affairs to put in place a mechanism against abuse and its aftermath.
Several female social workers and researchers said that they paid a visit to one of the victims.
They said that her case will be referred to family protection services, but that she would not be allowed to return to the shelter.
However, she will receive financial aid to pay for temporary lodging or be enrolled in training programs to qualify her for a job.
A judge at a Dammam court, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said, “There is no defined mechanism to deal with such cases. We only get notifications from social affairs offices to assist these cases on the judicial level and to speed up proceedings.”
He said that there are eight pending cases of divorce filed by victims of domestic violence with no parents in Eastern Province courts, noting that these cases have been given priority but no preferential treatment.


The Saudi content creator ‘decluttering’ our feeds

Amani Abudawood
Updated 12 min 25 sec ago

The Saudi content creator ‘decluttering’ our feeds

  • I care about the impact more than the number of viewers, says Amani Abudawood

JEDDAH: The University of Business and Technology hosted the In:AD — Innovation in Advertising event on Tuesday. The event aims to bring together practitioners and academics to discuss trends and innovation in advertising in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East and beyond.
Amani Abudawood, the 35-year-old founder of Instagram blog Tabseet and content development service Wojood, shared her experiences with Arab News.
“Every post on Tabseet reflects my experience. There’s no book I posted and haven’t read, and no product I post about without trying it myself. It’s a personal blog, but it’s different,” she said.
“Wojood focuses on the work I’ve done with clients and how to enrich Arabic content. The goal of Wojood is to empower smaller companies. Clients come to content developers because they don’t have the tools and don’t know where to start.
“They might go to an agency for them to take care of their content, but what happens after three months? They stop posting because they worry about sabotaging their own content. What I do at Wojood is allow the client to write the content themselves, but I will guide them every step of the way.”
During her speech, Abudawood shared her perspective on working in the media.
“I care about the impact more than the number of viewers. No one knows how far one can reach, I want to impact as many people as possible. I see it as my responsibility to share my knowledge and see who it impacts.”
One of her posts had a 30-day decluttering exercise, starting with one’s room and ending with the mind.
“Tabseet means minimalism. Unfortunately some people take it to the extreme and sell everything — this happens abroad — and keep only the things they need. When I thought about this, Zuhd (the act of detachment) came to mind,” she said.
“The idea we have about Zuhd is usually an old man who has very little and is content with what he has. I started researching and found a quote by Ali ibn Abi Talib: ‘Detachment is not that you should own nothing, but that nothing should own you.’ This means that I don’t have to own so little, it means that nothing is supposed to have any power over me.”
Decluttering is important because it helps one differentiate between what they want and what they need, she said.
“Minimalism plays a role in all aspects of life. From a social perspective, I exited many WhatsApp groups that I don’t need. Another example is zero waste, we don’t need straws to drink anything. It’s harmful for the environment and I don’t need it. Detachment is needed in all areas of life, from objects to money to relationships.”