Women from broken homes more prone to domestic abuse

Updated 29 May 2014

Women from broken homes more prone to domestic abuse

Women who have not been brought up by their biological parents are more prone to domestic violence if they marry men from similar sociological backgrounds, said experts.
This, many have said, is due to the fact that these women do not have families that can intervene and protect them.
Many women have since demanded special laws to address social problems related to divorce and alimony.
One such victim of abuse recounted her ordeal to local media.
“Two years ago, I married a young man who had also lived in a shelter like myself with no parents or next of kin,” she said.
“I soon found myself getting beaten up everyday until one day, he broke my jaw. I reported the incident to the Social Affairs Department, who referred me for treatment.”
The bruised and battered woman now lives in a furnished apartment that costs SR2,700 monthly in rent, which is is paid by the department.
“I filed for divorce 18 months ago and a supervising committee is currently following up on my case,” she said.
“I fail to understand why there are no special laws to shield us from violence considering we have no family or parents to protect us.”
“Women who have grown up in government shelters need even more protection after they get married,” said another domestic abuse victim.
The woman, who had suffered minor fractures, told local media: “When we get married to men that come from broken homes like us, we become more vulnerable to domestic violence because these men suffer from negative self-image that translates into violence and insubordination.”
“Children are often at the receiving end of such violence and self-loathing,” she said.
“No one knows of the circumstances we live in or the daily violence we face. I approached a human rights body, but they were unresponsive. The Social Affairs Department only provides financial in the form of rent, but we have to earn our living ourselves.”
She appealed to the Minister of Social Affairs to put in place a mechanism against abuse and its aftermath.
Several female social workers and researchers said that they paid a visit to one of the victims.
They said that her case will be referred to family protection services, but that she would not be allowed to return to the shelter.
However, she will receive financial aid to pay for temporary lodging or be enrolled in training programs to qualify her for a job.
A judge at a Dammam court, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said, “There is no defined mechanism to deal with such cases. We only get notifications from social affairs offices to assist these cases on the judicial level and to speed up proceedings.”
He said that there are eight pending cases of divorce filed by victims of domestic violence with no parents in Eastern Province courts, noting that these cases have been given priority but no preferential treatment.


Concerns rise over fake gold in Saudi Arabia

Local gold markets have seen stagnation in recent times, because of the increasing price of gold on international stock markets. (Photo/Shutterstock)
Updated 22 February 2020

Concerns rise over fake gold in Saudi Arabia

  • Accusations fly as pilgrims targeted by sellers of counterfeit precious metal

JEDDAH: A video posted on Twitter by a member of the Precious Metals Committee explaining the ways some gold manufacturers manipulate weight of gold and diamonds has attracted significant attention in Saudi Arabia, raising the question of the authenticity of gold in the Kingdom.

In the video, Mohammed Azooz said cover-ups have made many Saudi gold sellers lose power over the market, and that industry was being controlled by non-Saudis.
In the video, he explained how some people circumvented customs and sneak gold into the country, especially during the Hajj season to target pilgrims.
The Arabic translation of #cheating_in_jewelry has been trending in Twitter for a few days, and several people posted about the issue, blaming those who were selling fake gold to pilgrims as pure gold.
This is not the first time the fake gold issue has been raised. The World Gold Council previously suspended its activities in the Kingdom following claims that some jewelry manufacturers mixed glass with gold. Former Minister of Commerce and Industry Abdullah Zainal rejected the accusations at the time, described them as “grave and dangerous.”
Local gold markets have seen stagnation in recent times, because of the increasing price of gold on international stock markets.

FASTFACTS

• Types of gold depend on the percentage of gold per kilogram. For example, 24k gold, which is considered the best in quality, is 99 percent gold mixed with 1 percent of precious metal such as silver or copper. This type of gold is considered pure, and not used for adornment.

• For a kilogram of 22k gold, 125 grams of precious metals are added to 875 grams of pure gold; 150 grams of precious metals are added to 850 grams to make a kilogram of 21k gold, and 18k gold has 250 grams of precious metals per kilogram.

The price of one kilogram of 24 karat (k) gold in the Kingdom can reach SR185,000 ($46,700).
Gold and economic experts say that the movement in gold prices depends on numerous factors such as political and economic events around the world, the price of the US dollar in banks, black markets, as well as the supply and demand trends in global stock markets.

Types of gold depend on the percentage of gold per kilogram. For example, 24k gold, which is considered the best in quality, is 99 percent gold mixed with 1 percent of precious metal such as silver or copper. This type of gold is considered pure, and not used for adornment.
For a kilogram of 22k gold, 125 grams of precious metals are added to 875 grams of pure gold; 150 grams of precious metals are added to 850 grams to make a kilogram of 21k gold, and 18k gold has 250 grams of precious metals per kilogram.

Opinion

This section contains relevant reference points, placed in (Opinion field)

The Kingdom has launched an initiative, the first of its kind, authorizing authorities to launch a Shariah-based gold investment fund to enrich investment products through the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul).
Moath Alkhasawneh, CEO and board member of FALCOM Financial Services, said the FALCOM Gold Fund was officially licensed by the Capital Market Authority. The fund aims to add value to Tadawul through a Shariah-based investment fund, as gold trading transactions are considered a good investment and a high-quality commodity with low risks in investment portfolios.
“Gold retains its value compared to banknotes — their value decreases because of inflation. The high demand on gold in light of the shortage of supply can drive the prices of gold higher in the long run,” said Alkhasawneh.
“The gold investment fund focuses on investment in pure and precious gold, and the investment transactions will take place at the Switzerland Gold Market under the supervision of the higher authorities in Switzerland. This will make it safer and more flexible.”