SRMG, SSRC sponsored dialogue forum in Kuala Lumpur today

Updated 30 November 2016

SRMG, SSRC sponsored dialogue forum in Kuala Lumpur today

JEDDAH: An International Dialogue Forum on “The Impact of Social Security and Economic Development Policies in Preventing Terrorism” will be held in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday.
The event sponsored by the Social Security Research Center (SSRC) of University Malaya will be held in cooperation with the Riyadh-based Saudi Research and Marketing Group (SRMG).
The scientific supervision of the forum will be conducted by EuroMENA, a specialized research center based in London.
The main objective of the dialogue is to bring together scholars and experts from relevant disciplinary backgrounds to conduct an open discussion on the the role of socioeconomic development policies in promoting peace and in the prevention of violence and terrorism.
Discussions of the forum will be based on social and economic development as a catalyst to counterterrorism and possible factors contributing to terrorism.
Deliberations will identify the actual reasons for terrorism.
The participants will also review the facts relating to terrorism and its misconceptions will be highlighted .
A new conceptual framework will be presented for economic development, social security and countering violence and terrorism. Experts and researchers will analyze the social and economic losses due to terrorism in developing countries.
The event will be attended by a large number of experts and interested parties from both countries, as well as researchers and experts from international organizations.
The Social Security Research Center (SSRC) was established in March 2011 at the Faculty of Economics and Administration (FEA), University of Malaya to initiate and carry out research, teaching and dissemination of evidence-based knowledge in the area of social security, including old age financial protection in order to enhance the understanding of this critical topic to promote economic development and social cohesion in Malaysia.
SRMG is the largest publishing group in the Middle East engaged mainly in providing information products and services by publishing newspapers and magazines covering the Middle East and globally in addition to general trading, advertisement, promotion, as well as printing, production and distribution services.
A set of important recommendations are to be made at the end of the concluding session of the forum.


Libya’s NOC lifts force majeure on exports but says output low

Updated 15 min 52 sec ago

Libya’s NOC lifts force majeure on exports but says output low

  • There is significant damage to the reservoirs and infrastructure
  • A first cargo of 650,000 barrels will be shipped by the Kriti Bastion Aframax tanker

TUNIS: Libya’s National Oil Corporation (NOC) lifted force majeure on all oil exports on Friday as a first tanker loaded at Es Sider after a half-year blockade by eastern forces, but said technical problems caused by the shutdown would keep output low.
“The increase in production will take a long time due to the significant damage to reservoirs and infrastructure caused by the illegal blockade imposed on January 17,” NOC said in a statement.
A first cargo of 650,000 barrels will be shipped by the Kriti Bastion Aframax tanker, chartered by Vitol, which two sources at Es Sider port said had docked and started loading on Friday morning.
The blockade, which was imposed by forces in eastern Libya loyal to Khalifa Haftar’s Libyan National Army (LNA), has cost the country $6.5 billion in lost export revenue, NOC said.
“Our infrastructure has suffered lasting damage, and our focus now must be on maintenance and securing a budget for the work to be done,” NOC chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in the statement.
Control over Libya’s oil infrastructure, the richest prize for competing forces in the country, and access to revenues, has become an ever-more significant factor in the civil war.
The internationally recognized Government of National Accord, supported by Turkey, has recently pushed back the LNA, backed by the United Arab Emirates, Russia and Egypt, from the environs of Tripoli and pushed toward Sirte, near the main oil terminals.