Jordan rejects ‘most wanted’ woman’s extradition to US

Ahlam Al-Tamimi
Updated 21 March 2017

Jordan rejects ‘most wanted’ woman’s extradition to US

AMMAN: Jordan’s Supreme Court on Monday rejected an appeal to extradite Ahlam Al-Tamimi, who was placed on the FBI’s “Most Wanted Terrorist” list, as her family urged Jordan’s government to ensure Al-Tamimi’s safety.
The court upheld a ruling issued by an appeals court, the official Petra news agency reported.
Petra, quoting a judicial source, said the extradition cannot go through because Jordan’s Parliament has never ratified an extradition agreement with the US signed in March 1995.
Al-Tamimi was blacklisted by the US in March and charged with “conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction against US nationals outside the US, resulting in death.”
The US Justice Department said Al-Tamimi, now in her mid-30s, escorted a Hamas suicide bomber to Jerusalem on Aug. 9, 2001, where he detonated a bomb, hidden inside a guitar, in a pizza shop.
The bomb killed 15, including two Americans, and wounded another 122. Al-Tamimi was arrested and put on trial, where she pleaded guilty, and was sentenced in 2003 to 16 life terms in prison.
She was released in a 2011 Israeli prisoner swap with Hamas. She faces possible execution or life in prison if she is captured, tried and convicted in the US.
Al-Tamimi’s family, in a statement received by Arab News, asked Jordan’s government to provide security and safety to their daughter and her husband Nizar as freed prisoners from Israeli prisons.
The statement said the judiciary “has always proven to uphold its independence, autonomy, fairness and patriotism. We have been fully confident that the court would issue its decision in favor of our daughter.”
The statement thanked individuals, civil society institutions and members of the media and Parliament for their support and solidarity in the face of “American injustice.”
Meanwhile, Jordan’s Muslim Brotherhood described the court’s decision as a firm stance in the face of all those who seek to affect Jordan’s sovereignty and violate the basic human rights of its citizens.
“The Muslim Brotherhood condemns and deplores the position and attitude of the US administration and its double standard, as it has remained silent and supportive of war crimes of the Zionists against the Palestinian people, but accuses the Jordanian citizen of using weapons of mass destruction,” it said in a statement.


Health fears over French academic held in Iran

Updated 16 min 55 sec ago

Health fears over French academic held in Iran

  • Adelkhah would be willing to end her hunger strike if Marchal was freed
  • Iran does not recognize dual nationality and has lashed out at Paris for what it has described as ‘interference’

PARIS: French-Iranian academic Fariba Adelkhah has requested access to her French colleague Roland Marchal in detention in Iran, saying she has “serious concerns” about his health, a committee supporting the pair said Thursday.
The two researchers have been held in the Islamic Republic since June, two of a number of foreigners arrested in Iran during a spike in tensions between Tehran and the West.
Adelkhah would be willing to end her hunger strike, which she started on Dec. 24, if Marchal was freed, the support committee said in a press release sent to AFP.
“She has the most serious concerns about his health — an alarm that we share,” because the Revolutionary Guards have refused a consular visit to Marchal since December, the committee said.
French nationals held abroad can usually receive consular visits, during which detention conditions — and their health — can be checked.
But Iran does not recognize dual nationality and has lashed out at Paris for what it has described as “interference” in the cases of the academics, both from Sciences Po university in Paris.
Adelkhah has refused to return to her cell and held a sit-in in a public area of the prison over the last week, demanding to see Marchal “to comfort him and check the state of his health,” the committee said.
Iran has dropped espionage charges against Adelkhah but she still faces charges of spreading “propaganda against the political system” and “conspiracy against national security.”
Marchal is accused of “collusion against national security,” according to his lawyer.
The two researchers are not the only foreign academics behind bars in Iran — Australian Kylie Moore-Gilbert of the University of Melbourne is serving a 10-year sentence on espionage charges. Moore-Gilbert is sharing a cell with Adelkhah and joined her on the hunger strike.
Arrests of foreigners including dual nationals in Iran have increased since the United States pulled out a landmark nuclear agreement with Tehran in 2018 and reimposed crippling sanctions.
France and other European nations have tried to salvage the deal, but tensions soared further after the US killing of Iranian commander Qasem Soleimani earlier this month.
France has regularly called on Iran to release Adelkhah and Marchal, with Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian saying earlier this month that their detention was “unacceptable.”