Naked models become living art at S. Korea festival

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In this photo taken on August 26, 2017, a model uses a portable fan to keep cool backstage during the Daegu International Bodypainting Festival in Daegu. The bodies of dozens of female models turned into living canvases this weekend as they allowed delicate brush strokes and flamboyant illustrations to cover up their bare skin. They are part of the 2017 Daegu International Bodypainting Festival along with top artists from 10 countries that runs until August 27 in South Korea's southeastern city of Daegu. (AFP)
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In this photo taken on August 26, 2017, a model poses for a photo during the Daegu International Bodypainting Festival in Daegu. The bodies of dozens of female models turned into living canvases this weekend as they allowed delicate brush strokes and flamboyant illustrations to cover up their bare skin. They are part of the 2017 Daegu International Bodypainting Festival along with top artists from 10 countries that runs until August 27 in South Korea's southeastern city of Daegu. (AFP)
Updated 27 August 2017

Naked models become living art at S. Korea festival

DAEGU, Korea: The bodies of dozens of female models were turned into living canvases at a festival in Seoul this weekend, as delicate brush strokes and flamboyant illustrations covered up their bare skin.
Near-naked women — wearing only panties and strategically placed pieces of tape on their breasts — packed the 2017 Daegu International Bodypainting Festival, surrounded by teams of artists and onlookers.
Top artists from across the world took part in the event South Korea’s southeastern city, as their female subjects strutted across the stage in high heeled shoes and exotic headdresses to display their dazzling body art before the cameras.
“I’ve never been naked anywhere but around my husband,” American participant Neome Mullenberg told AFP as artists, equipped with spray paint and brushes, diligently worked on her body.
“The weirdest part is that I feel like I’m fully clothed,” Mullenberg said, adding that the camera flashes and gazes from strangers did not bother her.
“It’s amazing how paint can make you feel like you’re clothed.”
In just six hours, the models were turned into walking works of art as they strutted down an open air stage in front of hundreds of spectators.
One model was transformed into an elegant blue and green peacock, while another looked as if she had just popped out of a fantasy novel, adorned with a pharaoh-like headpiece and with images of the Greek gods painted on her body.
Italian artist Anna Chapovalov said recommendations from her colleagues and photos from previous events were enough to get her to jump on a plane from Austin, Texas for this year’s festival.
“I loved how the event was organized. It’s worth it,” Chapovalov said.
The artists, who compete for cash prizes, are judged on a range of criteria including the use of color, painting techniques and originality.


Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

Updated 04 June 2020

Florida offers drive-through Botox to quarantined residents

  • US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic
  • Elective medical procedures resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery

MIAMI: Quarantined Florida residents worried about their laughter lines and crows’ feet need frown no longer — Botox is back, and it’s being offered at a drive-through.
On May 4, the US state allowed a partial relaxing of restrictions imposed to slow the coronavirus pandemic. That means certain elective medical procedures could resume, including Botox injections and cosmetic surgery.
Michael Salzhauer, a plastic surgeon known as ‘Dr. Miami’ who has also starred in a reality television show, has been conducting drive-through Botox injections in the garage of his building in the posh Miami neighborhood of Bal Harbor.
Salzhauer said the idea struck him as he was sitting in his car waiting for a blood test for COVID-19 antibodies.
“The areas that we inject Botox are the upper face, exactly the parts of the face that aren’t covered by the mask so it’s really ideal,” Salzhauer said, while wearing a mask, face shield and surgical gown as he waited for his next drive-up patient.
Patients sign up online, paying an average of $600 each for a stippling of shots across their foreheads.
Arman Ohevshalom, 36, was enthusiastic as he waited in line with his wife in their car, although it was their first time receiving the injections.
“It’s very creative, and after seeing how they’re running it I feel just as comfortable as I would in the office,” he said.
Florida’s tattoo artists, however, are frustrated. Shuttered since March, they asking why they cannot open, too.
Botox injections are “kind of like tattooing, he’s injecting stuff into the skin,” said tattoo shop owner Chico Cortez. Florida is home to about 10,000 working tattoo artists, according to the Florida Professional Tattoo Artist Guild.
An emailed statement from a Miami-Dade County spokesperson said Mayor Carlos Gimenez has yet to set a date for reopening tattoo shops. “He is working with industry members and the medical experts to come up with the best way to reopen safely,” it said.