Qatari pilgrims laud Saudi Arabia for Hajj services

A pilgrim uses an umbrella to protect his wife from the sun while she is praying at the Grand Mosque in Makkah. (Reuters)
Updated 07 September 2017
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Qatari pilgrims laud Saudi Arabia for Hajj services

AL-AHSA: Qatari pilgrims said that the Kingdom provided them with all facilities and services to perform their Hajj rituals.
These remarks were made by Qatari pilgrims as they returned to their country through the Salwa border crossing following directives from King Salman to open the border to allow Qataris to enter the Kingdom to perform Hajj, following mediation by Sheikh Abdullah bin Ali Al-Thani.
They said all means of comfort and facilities were provided, especially since there were 354 more Qatari pilgrims than last year.
A number of Qatari pilgrims arrived on Tuesday at the border on their way to Doha. Some came by land from Makkah and others had picked up their cars which were parked at the Dammam and Al-Ahsa airports.
For his part, the director of the Salwa customs department, Abdulrahman Aba Al-Khail, said the number of Qatari pilgrims who have left the Kingdom reached 130 after performing Hajj.
Hamad Falih, Qatari pilgrim, said Saudi Arabia was known to help the needy, adding that procedures were easy.
Mohammed Al-Mirri said Saudi Arabia was known for providing services and the development of infrastructure in Makkah, notably in the holy sites.
He noted a big difference in terms of services compared to previous years where security men were deployed in all parts of the holy sites, while humanitarian services were always available.
He said there were Hajj missions in Doha that used to provide services to Qatari pilgrims but what they found with the Guests of King Salman for Hajj and Umrah Program was far better, especially in the holy sites and transportation.
Meanwhile, some 1.93 million travelers left Saudi Arabia in the past two weeks, 45 percent of them during the four days of Eid, according to official statistics published by Aleqtesadiah daily.
Meanwhile, the General Directorate of Passports stressed the importance for Saudis of holding undamaged, valid and up-to-date travel documents.
Saudis traveling to Gulf countries only need their national ID cards. But the passports of Saudis traveling to other Arab countries should be valid for at least three months, while the passports of those traveling to non-Arab countries should be valid for a minimum of six months.


Saudi Aramco has emerged from attacks ‘stronger than ever’: CEO

Updated 21 September 2019

Saudi Aramco has emerged from attacks ‘stronger than ever’: CEO

  • The September 14 attacks on the Abqaiq and Khurais plants caused raging fires and significant damage
  • Aramco already brought back part of the lost production and will return to pre-attacks level end of September

RIYADH: Saudi Aramco has emerged from attacks on its oil facilities “stronger than ever,” Chief Executive Amin Nasser told employees in a message, adding that full oil production would resume by the end of this month.
The Sept. 14 attacks on the Abqaiq and Khurais plants, some of the kingdom’s biggest, caused raging fires and significant damage that halved the crude output of the world’s top oil exporter, by shutting down 5.7 million barrels per day of production.
“The fires that were intended to destroy Saudi Aramco had an unintended consequence: they galvanized 70,000 of us around a mission to rebound quickly and confidently, and Saudi Aramco has come out of this incident stronger than ever,” Nasser said in the internal message, on the occasion of the Saudi national day, to be celebrated on Sept. 23.
“Every second counts in moments like these, and had we not acted quickly to contain the fires and undertake rapid restoration efforts, the impact on the oil market and the global economy would have been far more devastating.”
Six days after the assault, which hit at the heart of the Saudi energy industry and intensified a decades-long struggle with arch-rival Iran, the state oil giant Aramco invited reporters on Friday to observe the damage and the repair efforts.
Thousands of employees and contractors have been pulled from other projects to work around the clock to bring production back. Aramco is shipping equipment from the United States and Europe to rebuild the damaged facilities, Aramco officials told reporters.
Aramco already brought back part of the lost production and will return to pre-attacks level end of September, Nasser said.
“Not a single shipment to our international customers has been missed or canceled as a result of the attacks, and we will continue to fulfil our mission of providing the energy the world needs,” he said in the message, seen by Reuters.
Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said on Tuesday that Saudi Arabia had used its reserves to maintain oil supply flows to customers abroad and inside the kingdom.
Yemen’s Houthi group claimed responsibility for the attacks but a US official said they originated from southwestern Iran. Tehran, which support the Houthis, has denied any involvement in the attacks.
Saudi Arabia says 18 drones and three missiles were fired at Abqaiq, the world’s largest oil processing facility, while the Khurais facility was hit by four missiles.
No casualties were reported at either site even though thousands of workers and contractors work and live in the area.