Srebrenica’s Muslim defender acquitted of crimes against Serbs

This file photo shows former Bosnian Army commander of Srebrenica, Naser Oric, talking to the AP in Sarajevo, Bosnia on June 1, 2011. (File photo by AP)
Updated 09 October 2017

Srebrenica’s Muslim defender acquitted of crimes against Serbs

SARAJEVO, Bosnia: Bosnian Muslim commander Naser Oric, who led the defense of Srebrenica during the 1992-95 war, was acquitted of war crimes against Serbs on Monday, a ruling that is set to deepen ethnic divisions 22 years after the conflict ended.
Serbia and the Bosnian Serbs had accused Oric’s men of killing Serb civilians in and around Srebrenica earlier in the war.
Srebrenica eventually fell to Bosnian Serb forces in 1995 — the ensuing killing of more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys was seen as Europe’s worst atrocity since World War Two.
“The accused Naser Oric and Sabahudin Muhic have been acquitted of charges of violating provisions of the Geneva Conventions,” judge Saban Maksumic told the Bosnian war crimes court, referring to one of Oric’s fellow soldiers. Families of the Serb victims walked out the courtroom protesting against the verdict.
Bosnian Muslims or Bosniaks view Oric as a national hero for defending the doomed eastern enclave.


36 people missing after boat sinks in Congo river: DRC police

Updated 15 September 2019

36 people missing after boat sinks in Congo river: DRC police

  • Seventy-six people survived after the vessel went down overnight on the outskirts of the capital

KINSHASA, Congo: Thirty-six people are missing after a boat sank in the Congo river on the outskirts of Kinshasa, DR Congo police said on Sunday.

The vessel, which was travelling to the capital, went down overnight in Maluku commune, about 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the centre of the city. Seventy-six people survived, police wrote on Twitter.

"The cause of the accident is not yet known," police spokesperson Colonel Pierrot-Rombaut Mwanamputu told AFP. Lake and river transport is widely used in Democratic Republic of Congo as the highway system is poor, but accidents are common, often caused by overloading and the unsafe state of vessels.

The boat involved was called a "baleiniere" or "whaler" - a commonly-used flat-bottomed vessel between 15 to 30 metres (50 to 100 feet) long by two to six metres wide.

In the vast majority of accidents, passengers are not equipped with life jackets and many cannot swim.