Discrimination in English soccer soars 60 percent

Tottenham's Dele Alli, Tottenham's Erik Lamela, Manchester United's Alexis Sanchez, and Manchester United's Antonio Valencia, from left to right, argue during the English Premier League soccer match between Tottenham Hotspur and Manchester United at Wembley stadium, in London, Wednesday Jan. 31, 2018. (AP)
Updated 07 February 2018

Discrimination in English soccer soars 60 percent

LONDON: Discrimination in English soccer soared 60 percent in the first half of the season.
The Premier League accounted for 64 of the 282 incidents of abuse reported to anti-discrimination group Kick It Out, a 50 percent jump on the first half of the previous season. Racism accounted for just over half of the reports gathered by Kick It Out.
“Our latest statistics reveal a significant increase in incidents of discrimination in football, which should act as a wake-up call to everyone in the sport,” Kick It Out chairman Herman Ouseley said.
“The spike in these mid-season reporting statistics comes against the backdrop of rising hatred in our society.”
Reporting incidents of abuse has also become more accessible as Kick It Out’s phone app becomes more prevalent. In the 2012-13 season only 53 discriminatory incidents were reported by the halfway point.
“Ultimately, tackling discrimination must be a collective effort,” Ouseley said. “The leaders across all sections of society and football, as well as the broader public and football supporters themselves, need to take action, report discrimination and help us eradicate hatred.”
After racism, incidents of homophobia, biphobia and transphobia account for next largest source of reports of discrimination (22 percent), followed by anti-Semitism (9 percent).
Incidents in the Premier League accounted for half of the reports in the professional game. Social media is becoming a growing outlet for discrimination, with most incidents on Twitter.


Saudi helpers step up to the tee at first women’s golf tournament

Updated 26 February 2020

Saudi helpers step up to the tee at first women’s golf tournament

  • Volunteers will have the chance to step inside the ropes and get up close with the sport’s leading players

JEDDAH: Saudi volunteers will be able to write their names into the history books by helping at the first-ever Saudi Ladies International professional golf tournament.

Competition organizers are looking to recruit hundreds of people to help with the smooth running of the four-day event from March 19-22 at the Royal Greens Golf & Country Club in King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC).

Volunteers will have the chance to step inside the ropes and get up close with the sport’s leading players, including Order of Merit winner Beth Allen, three-time Ladies European Tour (LET) winner Carly Booth and Solheim Cup hero Azahara Munoz, as they compete for $1 million in prize money. 

The LET tournament in Saudi Arabia will mark the first time that professional female golfers have played competitively in the country, and comes hot on the heels of last month’s triumphant men’s equivalent, the Saudi International, won by Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell.

Online registration is now open for the debut event’s volunteers’ program.

Volunteers will be briefed before the event and receive a tournament uniform to wear while they work.

Marshals, including traveling, static, crossing and transitional positions, will be required for the tournament. Mobile scoreboard operators and walking scorers are among other roles that will offer volunteers a unique insight into the world-class event.

Mike Oliver, event director at Golf Saudi, said: “For the first year of this event, we are offering volunteers a chance to be part of history, working at the first professional women’s golf event to be held in the country.

“Volunteers, from both Saudi Arabia and abroad, will play a key role in helping us deliver a successful inaugural tournament,” he said.

A certificate of service will be presented to volunteers at the completion of the tournament.

As a bonus, volunteers will have their photo taken with the 2020 ladies winner during the prize presentation — a moment that will be seen by a worldwide audience via live broadcasts.