Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

Netflix is set to produce its first Arabic original series. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 February 2018

Netflix set to produce company’s first Arabic original series

DUBAI: Netflix is set to produce the company’s first Arabic original series, the online streaming service announced in a press statement on Monday.
The series, titled Jinn (which means ghost), will revolve around a group of Arab teenagers who find themselves confronted by a ghost boy in the ancient city of Petra.
The supernatural drama will have its characters’ friendships and romances tested when they attempt to stop a great darkness threatening to end the world.
Set to be filmed in Amman, the show will be helmed by some of the Middle East’s hottest up-and-coming talent, with Lebanese Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya (Very Big Shot) directing and Jordanian Bassel Ghandour (Oscar-nominated Theeb) penning the script.
“This is a great opportunity to portray Arab youth in a very unique way. The level of authenticity Netflix is trying to achieve with this show is definitely what attracted me the most to be part of this project,” Mir-Jean Bou Chaaya said.
Netflix’s Vice President of International Orignal Series Erik Barmack said the company is “extremely excited to bring this story to a global audience, and to celebrate Arab youth and culture. We can’t wait to share more details later this year.”
The show would be the second project the company will be running in the region with its first being an Arabic stand-up comedy special starring Lebanese comedian Adel Karam.


Research shows ‘mobile-first’ strategy is key to reaching more Saudi consumers

Updated 10 August 2020

Research shows ‘mobile-first’ strategy is key to reaching more Saudi consumers

  • The “demand for TV-quality mobile content is growing faster than ever,” with 87 percent of Saudis watching more videos on their smartphone
  • Saudis spend a daily average of four hours on their mobile phones for entertainment

DUBAI: The majority of Saudis are watching videos on the mobile phones, according to a report commissioned by social media giant Snap Inc.

The study, conducted by independent market research company The National Research Group, examined how the younger generations – Gen Z and Millennials – consume mobile content in their daily lives.

It noted that “demand for TV-quality mobile content is growing faster than ever,” with 87 percent of Saudis watching more videos on their smartphone than a year ago.

The research also showed 96 percent of the surveyed population preferred videos that appear vertically on their screens because they are “more personal” while 94 percent described this format as “more immersive.”

“We have seen a drastic shift in how people choose to communicate and consume media and mobile video has become at the forefront of storytelling,” Hussein Freijeh, Middle East and North Africa Regional Director of Snap Inc., said in release.

Saudis spend a daily average of four hours on their mobile phones for entertainment, the research found, much less in comparison to an hour and 58 minutes spent watching TV.

The younger generations also showed more preference towards short-form videos, saying they fit better into their routines.