What We Are Reading Today: ‘Grace: Her Lives, Her Loves’ by Robert Lacey

Updated 25 April 2018

What We Are Reading Today: ‘Grace: Her Lives, Her Loves’ by Robert Lacey

  • Grace Kelly was at the height of her fame when she was introduced to Prince Rainier of Monaco
  • Meghan Markle is not the first actress to bag a royal prince for a husband

With excitement building over the forthcoming royal wedding in Britain, it is easy to forget that Meghan Markle is not the first actress to bag a royal prince for a husband. 

In 1955, 25-year-old American actress and film star Grace Kelly was at the height of her fame, with an Oscar to her name, when she was introduced to Prince Rainier of Monaco during the Cannes Film Festival. 

They began writing to each other, and though they met only a few times, when Rainier proposed eight months later Kelly accepted. 

In April 1956, the film star became Her Serene Highness Princess Grace of Monaco, with 140 other titles. 

Their wedding in the tiny principality on the Mediterranean was watched by an estimated 30 million television viewers, perhaps the first “celebrity” event to command mass audiences. 

The marriage was not entirely happy. It was said that she mourned the loss of her film career, and felt stifled by the limitations of royal life. In 1982, she was killed after she suffered a stroke while driving. 

“Grace: Her Lives, Her Loves,” by respected royal historian Robert Lacey, is a well-researched and illuminating account of a woman who gave up acting but ended up playing the biggest role of her life.


What We Are Reading Today: Rated Agency: Investee Politics in a Speculative Age

Updated 03 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Rated Agency: Investee Politics in a Speculative Age

Author: Michel Feher

The hegemony of finance compels a new orientation for everyone and everything: Companies care more about the moods of their shareholders than about longstanding commercial success; governments subordinate citizen welfare to appeasing creditors; and individuals are concerned less with immediate income from labor than appreciation of their capital goods, skills, connections, and reputations.
That firms, states, and people depend more on their ratings than on the product of their activities also changes how capitalism is resisted.
For activists, the focus of grievances shifts from the extraction of profit to the conditions under which financial institutions allocate credit.
In clear and compelling prose, Michel Feher explains the extraordinary shift in conduct and orientation generated by financialization. Above all, he articulates the new political resistances and aspirations that investees draw from their rated agency.