FaceOf: Prince Abdul Aziz Turki Al-Faisal, Vice chairman to the board in the KSA’s General Sports Authority

Updated 28 April 2018

FaceOf: Prince Abdul Aziz Turki Al-Faisal, Vice chairman to the board in the KSA’s General Sports Authority

  • At an early age, he decided to pursue motorsports
  • His ultimate goal is to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans

Prince Abdul Aziz Turki Al-Faisal, the current vice chairman to the board in the General Sports Authority, was born in Riyadh in 1983. 

He studied politics at King Saud University from 2001 to 2003 then went on to take a politics degree at School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. 

He also studied marketing at the College of Business Administration (CBA), Jeddah, from 2006 until he graduated in 2010. 

Additionally, he graduated from the Formula BMW School in Bahrain in 2005.

He spent most of his childhood in Europe, where he pursued an active lifestyle and was introduced to motorsports. At an early age, he decided to pursue motorsports.

In 2009, he took part in the 24-hour race for the Toyo Tires Cup in Dubai, his team came second while he raced to first place in the A5 category. 

He also competed in the Porsche GT3 European Super Cup Series.

Between 2009 and 2010, he raced in the Middle East Porsche Cup Championship, finishing first and earning the championship title. 

In 2011, he took on a challenge to prove himself outside the Middle East, winning the first race in the FIA GT3 in Portugal.

By 2012, Prince Abdul Aziz had won the Porsche GT3 Championship for the second time and competed in the Dunlop 24-hour race in Dubai, finishing fourth. 

He is known as the first Saudi to participate in a GT3 European championship race and win. He solely won 23 races by 2013, paving the way for Saudis to enter more competitions.

In 2015, he won in Dubai, kick-starting a string of top-10 finishes in the racing season. His ultimate goal is to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.