Denmark to withdraw special forces from Iraq

Danish foreign minister Anders Samuelsen said that his government will withdraw its special forces from Iraq. (AFP)
Updated 17 May 2018

Denmark to withdraw special forces from Iraq

  • Denmark will continue its contribution in the fight against Daesh with a radar facility and ground staff in Iraq.
  • The country is withdrawing its special forces because Daesh no longer controls large areas in Iraq.

STOCKHOLM: NATO-member Denmark said Thursday its special forces taking part in the US-led coalition against Daesh in Iraq would be withdrawn following the defeat of the extremist group.
"We have now reached a point where we can begin withdrawing our special forces because (IS) no longer has control over large areas in Iraq," Danish foreign minister Anders Samuelsen said in a statement.

Samuelsen added: "It is important to stress that the fight against IS isn't over yet," adding Denmark would continue its contribution in the fight against Daesh with a radar facility and ground staff.
Up to 60 special forces were sent to Iraq in 2016 to train and advise Iraqi soldiers after a vote by the Danish parliament.
The forces also took part in operations on the Iraqi-Syrian border, providing intelligence and ad hoc air support.
"Their Iraqi partners are now ready to stand on their own two feet," Danish defence minister Claus Hjort Frederiksen said in the statement.
"(IS) have been forced away from virtually all the areas which the terrorist organisation occupied in Iraq," he added.
The Scandinavian nation currently has around 180 troops stationed at the Al-Asad air base near Baghdad, where they have been training Iraqi soldiers and Kurdish security forces.


Protests in New Delhi against India’s citizenship law ahead of Trump visit

Updated 23 February 2020

Protests in New Delhi against India’s citizenship law ahead of Trump visit

  • Hundreds of people supporting the new law clashed with those opposing it
  • The protest comes just a day before US President Donald Trump begins a two-day visit to India

NEW DELHI: Police used tear gas to disperse large crowds in India’s capital of New Delhi on Sunday in the latest eruption of violence at protests over a new citizenship law, police officials said.
Hundreds of people supporting the new law clashed with those opposing it, with the two groups pelting each other with stones in the Maujpur area in the northeastern part of the city, according to television footage.
“There must be some miscreants who want to spoil the peace in the area. We will identify them and take action against them,” Alok Kumar, a senior Delhi police official, told reporters about the protest.
“The situation is under control now,” he added.
The protest comes just a day before US President Donald Trump begins a two-day visit to India, where he is expected to raise the issue of religious freedom in the country with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
India’s Citizenship Amendment Act, which eases the path for non-Muslims from neighboring Muslim-majority nations to gain citizenship, has triggered weeks of sometimes violent protests against Modi’s government.
The Indian law is seen by opponents as discriminating against Muslims and has deepened concerns that Modi’s administration is undermining India’s secular traditions.
Modi’s ruling Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party denies any bias against the country’s 180 million Muslims.
On Sunday, a separate protest also erupted in the northern Indian city of Aligarh, where protesters threw stones at the police, state administration official Chandra Bhushan Singh said.
The Internet in the area had been suspended until midnight, he added.