Depression, addiction, divorce: The hidden cost of Syria’s war

Depression, addiction, divorce: The hidden cost of Syria’s war
Almost everyone has suffered in some form as a result of what the UN human rights chief described as ‘the worst man-made disaster since World War II.’ AFP
Updated 16 June 2018

Depression, addiction, divorce: The hidden cost of Syria’s war

Depression, addiction, divorce: The hidden cost of Syria’s war
  • 60 percent of children surveyed had symptoms of depression, 45 percent showed signs of PTSD and 65 percent had serious “psychosomatic symptoms
  • Since the civil war began in 2011, an estimated 400,000 Syrians have been killed and millions more displaced

DAMASCUS: Rawan, a 22-year-old medical student at Damascus University, confided in her aunt about her depression, but was shocked at the response.

“You should be ashamed of yourself,” the aunt replied. “A true believer never gets depressed. Don’t speak of this to anyone or they will call you crazy and no one will marry you or even trust you as a physician.”
Like many other Syrians, Rawan decided to keep her depression to herself rather than have her “faith judged and be labeled insane.”
Since the civil war began in 2011, an estimated 400,000 Syrians have been killed and millions more displaced, but the toll the conflict has taken on the mental health of people remains largely unquantifiable.
Even in the relatively liberal and cosmopolitan confines of Damascus, conservative attitudes toward post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression hold sway. Few Syrians talk openly about how the bloodshed has affected them psychologically.
This has led to experts both inside and outside Syria warning that the country will face a wide range of social problems — from substance addiction to suicide — for years to come as generations of Syrians struggle to live with the consequences of what they have seen.
Unable to ask her family for help, Rawan’s depression left her convinced that her work as a medical student was pointless.
“Why should I go to college and study hard when I know this war isn’t likely to end soon and there will be no future for me here?” she told Arab News.
Last year, Mazen Hedar, president of the Syrian Association of Psychiatry, told a local newspaper there were only 70 mental health specialists in the country. He claimed 4 percent of the people in Syria suffer from “severe mental illnesses,” while 20-40 percent “suffer from moderate illnesses.”
But with even basic health services left in ruins by the war and fighting still taking place in many areas, the real numbers are impossible to know.
Almost everyone has suffered in some form as a result of what the UN human rights chief Zeid Ra’ad Al-Hussein described as “the worst man-made disaster since World War II” and an “immense tidal wave of bloodshed and atrocity.”
While Damascus has escaped the worst of the violence and much of the city is now relatively safe, people still feel shocked at the way their country has descended into chaos and are anxious about the future.
Layla, a 26-year-old computer engineer based in the city, told Arab News that her family do not trust Syrian health workers.
“Botched surgeries go unpunished and carelessness goes unnoticed — do you think I would trust a psychologist in a culture that still believes he’s a doctor to the crazy and that those with chronic depression, PTSD or schizophrenia belong in a straitjacket? Sorry, no,” she said.
A study of Syrian refugee children in Turkey during late 2012 and early 2013 found that 74 percent “had experienced the death of somebody they cared strongly about.”
The study, conducted by researchers at Bahcesehir University in Turkey, New York University and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, found 60 percent of children surveyed had symptoms of depression, 45 percent showed signs of PTSD and 65 percent had serious “psychosomatic symptoms.”
Dr. Wael Al-Delaimy of the University of California told Arab News that PTSD can lead to social problems including divorce, unemployment and crime.
He said the level of trauma experienced by people in Damascus could not be compared to the suffering of people elsewhere in the country, where “there is bombing, terrorizing and killing of civilians on a daily basis.”
Al-Delaimy called for Syrian health professionals to adopt a different approach to mental illness, “focusing on prevention and early detection.”


Israel vaccinate Palestinians with Israeli work permits against COVID-19

Israel vaccinate Palestinians with Israeli work permits against COVID-19
Updated 25 min 43 sec ago

Israel vaccinate Palestinians with Israeli work permits against COVID-19

Israel vaccinate Palestinians with Israeli work permits against COVID-19
  • Palestinian medical teams would be stationed at checkpoints to administer the vaccines
  • Of the 5.2 million people, only 32,000 have received the vaccine to date

JERUSALEM: Israel will administer COVID-19 vaccines to Palestinians who work in Israel or in its settlements in the occupied West Bank, the Israeli liaison office COGAT said on Sunday.
The vaccination campaign, which could apply to around 130,000 Palestinians, will begin within days, COGAT said.
Shaher Saad, secretary-general of the Palestinian Workers’ Union, said thousands of Palestinians who work in the Israeli service and industrial sectors had already been vaccinated privately by their employers inside Israel.
He said Palestinian medical teams would be stationed at checkpoints to administer the vaccines, by agreement with Israeli authorities.
Israel has given at least one dose of the Pfizer Inc. vaccine to more than half of its 9.3 million population, including Palestinians in East Jerusalem.
But it has come under international criticism for not doing more to enable vaccination of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, territories that Israel captured in the 1967 Middle East war.
The Palestinians have received around 32,000 vaccine doses to date, for the 5.2 million people who live in the West Bank and Gaza.
Israeli officials have said that, under the Oslo peace accords, the Palestinian health ministry is responsible for vaccinating people in Gaza and those parts of the West Bank where it has limited self-rule.


Jordan ministers sacked for virus rules breach

Jordan ministers sacked for virus rules breach
Updated 28 February 2021

Jordan ministers sacked for virus rules breach

Jordan ministers sacked for virus rules breach
  • The pair were asked to step down by Prime Minister Bisher Al-Khasawneh
  • The Jordanian news website Ammon claimed Mobaideen and Talhuni had attended a dinner in a restaurant in Amman with a total of nine people

AMMAN: Jordan’s interior and justice ministers were sacked Sunday for breaching health regulations to stem the spread of coronavirus, with their replacements named by royal decree.
The pair were asked to step down by Prime Minister Bisher Al-Khasawneh, a move immediately endorsed by King Abdullah II, according to a statement from the royal palace.
They are accused, according to a government source, of “having violated the emergency law” put in place to curb Covid-19.
The Jordanian news website Ammon claimed interior minister Samir Mobaideen and justice minister Bassam Talhuni had attended a dinner in a restaurant in Amman with a total of nine people, when the law allowed a maximum of six.
Tawfiq Krishan, deputy prime minister and in charge of local administration, was appointed as the new interior minister.
Ahmed Ziyadat, State Secretary for Legal Affairs, was named as justice minister.
Following a surge in virus cases, Jordan toughened this week its Covid-19 restrictions, returning to rules imposed in March last year, and which were only eased last month.
Jordan, which began vaccinations last month, has officially recorded more than 386,000 novel coronavirus cases and 4,675 deaths out of a population of 10.5 million people.


Turkey summons Iran ambassador over accusations Ankara is violating Iraqi sovereignty: Al Arabiya

Turkey summons Iran ambassador over accusations Ankara is violating Iraqi sovereignty: Al Arabiya
Updated 28 February 2021

Turkey summons Iran ambassador over accusations Ankara is violating Iraqi sovereignty: Al Arabiya

Turkey summons Iran ambassador over accusations Ankara is violating Iraqi sovereignty: Al Arabiya

CAIRO: Turkey has summoned the Iranian ambassador over accusations by Tehran that Ankara is violating Iraqi sovereignty, Al Arabiya TV reported Sunday. 

Turkey said it expects from Tehran to stand by Ankara in “combating terrorism”. 

Last week, Iran summoned the Turkish ambassador in Tehran over comments made by Turkish officials accusing Iran of destabilizing the region by getting involved in Iraq and Syria. 


Iran health ministry says virus deaths cross 60,000 mark

Iran health ministry says virus deaths cross 60,000 mark
Updated 28 February 2021

Iran health ministry says virus deaths cross 60,000 mark

Iran health ministry says virus deaths cross 60,000 mark

Iran's health ministry said the country's coronavirus fatalities broke the 60,000 mark on Sunday, as the Islamic republic battles the Middle East's worst outbreak of the illness.
"Sadly in the past 24 hours, 93 people lost their lives to Covid-19, and total deaths from this disease reached 60,073," health ministry spokeswoman Sima Sadat Lari said in a televised address.
Iran has registered a total of 1,631,169 infections, according to the ministry.


Russian helicopter makes emergency landing in Syria

Russian helicopter makes emergency landing in Syria
Updated 28 February 2021

Russian helicopter makes emergency landing in Syria

Russian helicopter makes emergency landing in Syria
  • Russian Defense Ministry said the helicopter was not fired at

AMMAN/MOSCOW: A Russian Mi-35 helicopter made an emergency landing due to technical problems during a flight over Syria’s northern Hasaka province, state agencies quoted Russia’s Defense Ministry as saying on Sunday.
“The crew was quickly evacuated to the airfield. There is no threat to lives of the pilots,” the RIA news agency cited a Defense Ministry statement as saying.
The helicopter was not fired at, it added.
Syrian state media said earlier there were reports of a Russian helicopter crash in northeast Syria that killed the pilot.
It said the site of the crash was in Hasaka province, near Tal Tamr close to a Russian base.