FaceOf: Saud Al-Qahtani, Saudi Royal Court adviser

Saud Al-Qahtani
Updated 23 June 2018

FaceOf: Saud Al-Qahtani, Saudi Royal Court adviser

  • Saud Al-Qahtani holds several certificates in law and administration, and has been an opinion writer for many Saudi and Arab newspapers and magazines
  • Saud Al-Qahtani promoted to the rank of captain before he pursued a master’s degree with honors in criminal justice from Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS)

JEDDAH: Saud Al-Qahtani is an adviser to the Royal Court, as well as the supervisor general of the Center for Studies and Information Affairs in Saudi Arabia.
He addressed Qatar’s manipulation of BeIN Sports on Friday, confirming that the Kingdom is taking appropriate legal measures against the Doha-owned station due to its incorporation of politics during the broadcast of the World Cup Saudi matches.
Born in Riyadh on June 7, 1978, Al-Qahtani completed his schooling in Riyadh and was a distinguished student, among the top ten in the Riyadh region.
He received his bachelor’s degree in law from King Saud University, then joined the officer training course in the Royal Saudi Air Force and graduated with honors with the rank of sergeant.
He was later promoted to the rank of captain before he pursued a master’s degree with honors in criminal justice from Naif Arab University for Security Sciences (NAUSS).
He holds several certificates in law and administration, and has been an opinion writer for many Saudi and Arab newspapers and magazines.
He is considered one of the most influential figures on the Saudi Twitter scene.
In 2003, he was assigned as a legal adviser to the secretariat to then Crown Prince Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, and by 2004 he became the secretariat’s media director.
In 2008, he served as the director general of media monitoring and analysis for the Royal Court.
In 2012, he became an adviser to the Royal Court and was given the rank of a minister in 2015.
Al-Qahtani is also a member of the board of directors for institutes such as King Abdul Aziz University, the Misk Foundation, Misk Schools, the Royal Commission for Al-Ula, and the Saudi Union for Cyber Security and Programming. He is also an honorary member of Al-Hilal football club.


Passionate Saudi musicians Jwa ready to take the world by storm

The group has plans to perform in Jordan, Egypt, Dubai and Bahrain, as it awaits the release of its first album before exploring new horizons. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 19 February 2020

Passionate Saudi musicians Jwa ready to take the world by storm

  • Jwa’s first album is due to be released on Feb. 25
  • The word “jwa” in Arabic means the “highest levels of passion and love,” which embodies how the quintet feel about Indie music — the thing that brought them together

RIYADH: The music scene in the Kingdom is exploding, with young, talented Saudis taking full advantage of the developments in the country by showcasing their talent.
 In a limited time, young Saudi musicians have proven that they are equal to any other young cohort of musicians anywhere in the world.
 One of those talents is a young band from Dhahran, Jwa. Currently performing locally in Riyadh, Jeddah and other cities in the Eastern Province, the group has plans to perform in Jordan, Egypt, Dubai and Bahrain, as it awaits the release of its first album before exploring new horizons.
 The band, formed in 2018, is composed of Methgal Al-Shammari on drums, Mohammad Al-Nahas (bass and vocals), Arkan Al-Zahrani (guitar), Mansour Al-Gallaf (guitar) and Fawaz Baasem (keyboard).
They have had two local hit singles, “Ya Safina” and “Min Jadeed.” Methgal and Mohammad, the founders of Jwa, say that at first they “performed at numerous local events and parties” across the Kingdom. It did not take them long to become popular among Saudis.

FASTFACTS

• Jwa was formed in 2018.

• Since its launch it has two local hit singles.

• The band’s first album is due to be released on Feb. 25.

The word “jwa” in Arabic means the “highest levels of passion and love,” which embodies how the quintet feel about Indie music — the thing that brought them together.
However, they have faced many challenges in the last two years. Methgal and Mohammad said initially a “lack of support for independent bands” and “weakness of the nurturing music environment” within the country halted their progress.
However, due to the steps taken by the General Entertainment Authority, bands like Jwa have become able to make their voices and music heard. In the future, they are looking to go international, to “make their band known not only to different regions of Saudi Arabia but also abroad to gain more momentum and attraction.”
Jwa’s first album is due to be released on Feb. 25.