US universities honor Saudi students who died trying to rescue kids

US universities honor Saudi students who died trying to rescue kids
Cousins Theeb Al-Yami, 27, and Jaser Al-Rakah, 25, died trying to rescue children from the Chicopee River. (Supplied)
Updated 15 September 2018

US universities honor Saudi students who died trying to rescue kids

US universities honor Saudi students who died trying to rescue kids
  • They were honored for their heroism and bravery during a ceremony at the latter university on September 14

WASHINGTON: Two Saudi students who died trying to save two young children from drowning have been awarded posthumous honorary degrees from the universities they were attending.
Cousins Theeb Al-Yami, 27, and Jasser Al-Rakah, 25, were studying in the United States when they joined several other people in an effort to rescue the youngsters, who were in distress in the Chicopee river in Wilbraham, Massachusetts, on June 29, 2018. The children managed to reach safety but the two students were swept away and drowned. They died just a month before they were due to graduate.
Al-Yami was awarded a bachelor’s degree in engineering by the University of Hartford in Connecticut, and Al-Rakah a degree in civil engineering from Western New England University in Massachusetts.
They were honored for their heroism and bravery during a ceremony at the latter university on September 14, which was attended by members of their families, the Deputy Ambassador of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to the United States Sami Al-Sadhan, the cultural attache at the Saudi Embassy Dr. Mohammed Al-Issa, the Consul General in New York Khalid Al-Sharif, professors from the universities and representatives of the local Islamic community.
Dr. Anthony Caprio, the president of Western New England University, expressed the appreciation of the university and the academic community for the heroism of the Saudi students.


Saudi Arabia’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic places it at the highest ranks on international indexes

Saudi Arabia’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic places it at the highest ranks on international indexes
According to ADAA, Saudi Arabia ranked among the top countries in three international indexes, among the world’s eight top countries in two indexes and among the 20 top countries in two others. (Shutterstock)
Updated 18 min 15 sec ago

Saudi Arabia’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic places it at the highest ranks on international indexes

Saudi Arabia’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic places it at the highest ranks on international indexes
  • ADAA follows up on the Kingdom’s progress and performance through the International Performance Hub, which compares the Kingdom’s performance against 217 other countries

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic has placed it at the highest ranks on several international indexes according to the National Center for Performance Measurement (ADAA) for the years 2020-2021.
According to ADAA, Saudi Arabia ranked among the top countries in three international indexes, among the world’s eight top countries in two indexes and among the 20 top countries in two others.
According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), the Kingdom ranked first worldwide in the response of entrepreneurs and the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The two indexes measured the levels of entrepreneurial motivation as Vision 2030 provided an ideal and flexible business environment able to withstand challenges such as the pandemic.

SPEEDREAD

According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), the Kingdom ranked first worldwide in the response of entrepreneurs and the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Kingdom has maintained its advanced position in the “food standards” indicator, where it was ranked first in 2020. This indicator is considered one of the sub-components of the “food security” index, released annually by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) to measure food security in countries based on four indicators: Food affordability, availability, quality and safety, and natural resources and resilience.
“The pandemic has forced many in the food industry to rethink our strategies and elevate our standards, providing the best food quality and services for our customers,” Mohammed Saleh, a restaurant owner based in Riyadh and Jeddah, told Arab News. “Our customers always come first and the quality of food was always a top priority but now with the extra care and precautions, customer satisfaction and safety is even more important.”
“Many restaurant owners I know have put into consideration all the changes that needed to be made to ensure that both quality and safety go hand in hand,” Saleh added. “We’ll only go forward from here.”
During the peak of the pandemic, the Kingdom jumped to eighth position among 113 countries in “the national food supply sufficiency” indicator and came ahead of 105 countries in growth of production of cereals and vegetables, climbing nine spots in the indicator in comparison to 2019. In the post-harvest and pre-consumption crops’ safety indicator, the Kingdom made significant progress, ranked among the 20 top countries worldwide.
The Kingdom has also come a long way in most of the indicators of the soft power index, measured based on three key performance indicators (KPIs): Reputation, familiarity and influence, where it ranked 20th and came ahead of 85 countries in its response to the pandemic, according to the Brand Finance report.
ADAA follows up on the Kingdom’s progress and performance through the International Performance Hub, which compares the Kingdom’s performance against 217 other countries. ADAA monitors and follows up on international indicators while the hub provides an overview of the Kingdom’s performance in 700 KPIs under 12 main pillars.


Saudi Arabia could consider mix-match second doses of coronavirus vaccine

Saudi Arabia could consider mix-match second doses of coronavirus vaccine
More than 47.7 percent of Saudi Arabia’s population have received at least one dose. (AP)
Updated 5 min 24 sec ago

Saudi Arabia could consider mix-match second doses of coronavirus vaccine

Saudi Arabia could consider mix-match second doses of coronavirus vaccine
  • Many of Saudi Arabia’s regions have shown signs of stability and decline in cases

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia could consider administering second doses from other vaccine manufacturers as soon as they are accredited in the Kingdom according to the Ministry of Health (MoH) spokesman.
At Sunday’s press conference, MoH spokesman Dr. Mohammed Al-Abd Al-Aly said that studies conducted in several countries have shown positive results, with more countries now applying the mix-match vaccine doses, including the US, Canada, Britain, the UAE and more.
Refuting claims about the depletion of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine in the Kingdom, Al-Aly reassured the public that the vaccine is still available and is being administered. More than 16.6 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the Kingdom so far, at a rate of 107,857 doses per day. More than 47.7 percent of Saudi Arabia’s population have received at least one dose.
The Kingdom reported 1,079 new cases, bringing the number of active cases in the country to 10,896, a decline of 149 cases in the past 24 hours.
“The rate at which the curve is going in the past few weeks have shown positive signs of stability,” said the MoH spokesman, adding: “Many of the Kingdom’s regions have shown signs of stability and decline in cases. We continue to encourage everyone to register for the vaccine as both vaccines and precautionary measures will help in overcoming this pandemic.”

FASTFACTS

474,191 Total cases

455,618 Recoveries

Most cases were registered in the Makkah region with 320, there were 216 cases in Riyadh and 206 cases in the Eastern Province. All other regions reported new case totals below 100, the Northern Borders reported six cases while Jouf reported only four.
The reports brought the total number of cases to 474,191 since the start of the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the Kingdom.
There were 1,214 new recoveries from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours. Most recoveries were registered in Jeddah with 187, Makkah followed with 150 and in Riyadh there were 138 recoveries. This has brought the total number of recoveries to 455,618. The Kingdom’s recovery rate is holding steady at 96 percent.
There were 20 new critical cases, bringing the total number of critical patients to 1,516. Fourteen people died in the last 24 hours, raising the overall death toll to 7,677. Some 84,652 PCR tests have been conducted via numerous testing hubs across the country.


KSrelief chief meets Japanese envoy in Riyadh

KSrelief chief meets Japanese envoy in Riyadh
Updated 7 min 33 sec ago

KSrelief chief meets Japanese envoy in Riyadh

KSrelief chief meets Japanese envoy in Riyadh

The supervisor general of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSrelief), Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, met Japanese ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Iwai Fumio, in Riyadh on Sunday.

During the meeting, they discussed issues of mutual interest related to humanitarian and aid affairs, and ways of enhancing cooperation.

Fumio praised KSrelief’s humanitarian and relief projects and programs aimed at helping countries and people in need around the world.

He also commended relations between Saudi Arabia and Japan.

Also on Sunday, Al-Rabeeah met Saudi ambassador to Tajikistan, Walid Al-Rasheedan.

The pair discussed issues of common interest related to rescue and humanitarian work between the Kingdom, represented by KSrelief, and Tajikistan, in addition to projects executed by KSrelief in the country.

Al-Rasheedan praised the efforts of KSrelief in support of impoverished people around the world, especially in Tajikistan, which comes as a result of support for KSrelief by the Kingdom’s leadership.

 

 


Who’s Who: Dr. Badar Al-Harbi,  deputy director general  at Saudi Arabia’s Institute of Public Administration

Who’s Who: Dr. Badar Al-Harbi,  deputy director general  at Saudi Arabia’s Institute of Public Administration
Updated 2 min 48 sec ago

Who’s Who: Dr. Badar Al-Harbi,  deputy director general  at Saudi Arabia’s Institute of Public Administration

Who’s Who: Dr. Badar Al-Harbi,  deputy director general  at Saudi Arabia’s Institute of Public Administration

Dr. Badar Al-Harbi has been the deputy director general for training affairs at the Institute of Public Administration (IPA) since 2016.

Al-Harbi, who has also been an assistant professor of health administration at the IPA since 2011, received a bachelor’s degree in health services administration from King Saud University in 2000. 

Four years later, Al-Harbi was granted a master’s degree in the same field from Florida International University, US. In 2011, he obtained a Ph.D. in health services management from the University of New England, Australia.

In 2005, he received Prince Bander bin Sultan Al-Saud’s Award for Academic Excellence from the Saudi Embassy in the US. The same year, he was listed on the American Chancellor’s List for High Academic Performance.

In June 2016, he spent four months as the director general of the IPA’s center for the development of administrative leaders. Prior to that, he worked for nearly two years as the institute’s manager of health sector, He had also served as a health sector coordinator at the IPA from 2013 to 2014.

From 2004 to 2011, Al-Harbi was a lecturer in the health administration of the IPA, where he had worked as an assistant trainer for four years beginning in 2000.

Al-Harbi has been a board member of the National Institute for Educational Development since January 2021. He has also been a member of the IPA’s scientific council since 2019. Moreover, he is a board member of the Human Resources Development Fund since 2018, where he is also the chairman of the internal audit committee since 2019.


Arab countries condemn Houthis’ launching of 17 drones toward Saudi Arabia from Yemen

Arab countries condemn Houthis’ launching of 17 drones toward Saudi Arabia from Yemen
Updated 35 min 58 sec ago

Arab countries condemn Houthis’ launching of 17 drones toward Saudi Arabia from Yemen

Arab countries condemn Houthis’ launching of 17 drones toward Saudi Arabia from Yemen
  • Iran-backed Houthi militia have consistently launched attacks against the Kingdom
  • The militia once again face international condemnation

RIYADH: Arab countries and organizations have denounced the Houthi attacks targeting Saudi Arabia’s Khamis Mushait and Najran using explosive-laden drones.
Saudi Arabia’s air defenses destroyed 17 drones launched toward the Kingdom’s southern region on Saturday.
A booby-trapped drone targeted Khamis Mushait early in the morning before seven more targeting the southern region were intercepted in Yemeni airspace during the afternoon.
Khamis Mushait was again targeted by two drones in the evening.
Another drone targeted Najran late evening before six more were shot down near midnight.

The Council of Arab Interior Ministers expressed its strong condemnation and absolute rejection of the terrorist attacks.
“The General Secretariat of the Council condemns these cowardly terrorist acts through which this militia is trying to target civilians and civilian objects on an ongoing and systematic basis, and this represents a violation of international law and war crimes and its perpetrators must be held accountable,” it said in a statement from its headquarters in Tunis.
The attacks are “clear evidence of the persistence of this militia in its blatant transgressions and its continuous refusal to comply with calls for peace and the efforts made to try to reach a political solution to the Yemeni crisis.”
The Arab interior ministers council renewed its full solidarity with Saudi Arabia and its absolute support in all the measures it takes to repel terrorist attacks, defend its security and protect its lands its facilities, citizens and residents.
Nayef Al-Hajraf, secretary-general of the Gulf Cooperation Council, condemned the continued and repeated attacks by the Iran-backed Houthis and said this reflects their blatant defiance of the international community, their disregard for all international laws and norms, and their rejection of all efforts aimed at bringing peace to Yemen.
He also called on the international community to assume its responsibilities and take a decisive stance toward the Houthi militia to stop these repeated terrorist acts targeting vital and civilian facilities.
The Muslim World League said “these attacks reflect the level of barbarism and the state of humiliation and despair that this militia suffers, while the Kingdom, in confronting this terrorist behavior, affirms its full ability to protect its lands and silence this criminal absurdity, with its high moral commitment stemming from its religious and national values and respect for international laws, charters and norms in its leadership of the Arab coalition.”
Bahrain’s foreign ministry said the militia’s continuation of the attacks threatened the security, stability, and territorial integrity of Saudi Arabia, state news agency BNA reported.
Djibouti’s ambassador to Saudi Arabia Diaa-Eddin Saed Bamakhrama said: “While the world is looking for solution initiatives in Yemen in order to achieve security and peace for its people, the militia continues to target civilians in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi Press Agency SPA reported.
The Arab Parliament, meanwhile, stressed the need for the international community to take immediate measures against the militia that threatened peace and security in the region.
Kuwait said it supported all the measures taken by Saudi Arabia to maintain its security and stability.
The UAE condemned the Houthis for “systematically targeting civilians,” while Jordan said any threat to the security of Saudi Arabia was a threat to the entire region.

Egypt also issued a similar statement.
The Houthi’s deliberate and systematic escalation against Yemen constituted a war crime, the Arab coalition said, adding that it was taking measures to protect civilians from attacks.
The Iran-backed Houthis have been attacking the Kingdom with explosive-laden drones on an almost daily basis in recent weeks despite US, United Nations and Saudi calls for a ceasefire in Yemen.

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