FaceOf: Dr. Sharifa Al-Rajhi, statistics professor at KSA’s King Abdul Aziz University

Dr. Sharifa Al-Rajhi
Updated 04 October 2018

FaceOf: Dr. Sharifa Al-Rajhi, statistics professor at KSA’s King Abdul Aziz University

  • Al-Rajhi served as a statistical consultant at Florida State’s Center for the Advancement of Human Rights
  • Al-Rajhi earned consecutive master’s degrees while at Florida State University (FSU)

Dr. Sharifa Al-Rajhi is a professor of statistics at King Abdul Aziz University (KAU) in Jeddah. 

Prior to her current platform at KAU, she served as a statistical consultant at Florida State’s Center for the Advancement of Human Rights. She analyzed data on the historical issues associated with human right violations to better understand its evolution and forecast trend. Additionally, Al-Rajhi conducted system data cleaning and interpreted results data.

Recently, Al-Rajhi had words of encouragement to female drivers in the Kingdom, saying, “We had some social obstacles that have long prevented women from driving, despite the fact that Saudi women have achieved great jobs on all levels.” 

“To me, driving means that you feel independent.” She said. 

Al-Rajhi earned consecutive master’s degrees while at Florida State University (FSU). In 2009, she completed her studies earning her Master’s of Science (MS) in mathematical statistics. 

In 2011, she would earn an additional MS degree in biostatistics. While she worked toward attaining her Ph.D. from FSU, of which she completed in 2015, Al-Rajhi gained experience working as a lecturer at the Department of Statistics at FSU, as well as serving as assistant professor at Tallahassee Community College Divisions of Natural Science and Mathematics. 

By this time, Al-Rajhi also completed an internship as a data analyst, as well as an internship on statistical consulting at Millennium Real Estate in Jeddah. 


Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Photo/Shutterstock
Updated 19 October 2020

Saudi Arabia’s public spaces dotted with pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  • According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage

JEDDAH: Splashes of pink are appearing in Saudi Arabia’s public spaces to raise awareness about the importance of breast cancer screening.
A number of campaigns are underway this month to support this outreach — in malls, on the street and on billboards.
Pamphlets are being handed out, videos and interactive pictures are on display, there are fundraising activities such as hiking and biking, and medical students have been talking to shoppers and passers-by as part of efforts to increase people’s knowledge.
In Jeddah there was a Tai Chi class on the city’s waterfront, headed by Amatallah Bahaziq, that was attended by female members of Bliss Runners and Bolts. Another event was a bike ride organized by Jeddah Cyclists that included men and women.
A number of major cities across the Kingdom have also seen pop-up campaigns, with specialists ready to answer questions and play a proactive role in spreading proper knowledge and information about the disease, its detection and the chances of survival when detected early.

HIGHLIGHT

According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.

The Zahra Breast Cancer Association is one of Saudi Arabia’s leading organizations dedicated to raising awareness about the disease. It has been supporting cancer patients and survivors and normalizing conversations about breast cancer among the community, with a renewed emphasis during October which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.
“Given the circumstances (due to the pandemic) we focused our efforts to raise awareness to the importance of early detection virtually,” a representative from the association told Arab News. “With billboards and visuals spread across Saudi cities, we’re still following through with our campaign promise to raise awareness each year and send the message across: Early detection will save your life.”
According to the Saudi Ministry of Health, 55 percent of cases are detected at a late stage. This late stage detection is mostly because some women believe that a lack of symptoms means an absence of the disease.