Banners of love and marriage in the streets of Egypt

Experts say the banners, while appearing traditional, are in fact driven by social media. (Supplied)
Updated 19 October 2018

Banners of love and marriage in the streets of Egypt

  • Apologetic messages to loved ones, expression of love and even marriage proposals have been seen hanging in the streets

CAIRO: In an era of social media even the most personal of messages are conveyed in digital form, or posted on Instagram or Facebook. 

But in a recent phenomenon, Egyptians have taken to hanging old fashioned banners in streets to declare their most personal feelings. 

Apologetic messages to loved ones, expression of love and even marriage proposals have been seen hanging in the streets of Cairo and other cities. 

While the banners have received mixed reactions from the community, ranging from admiration to criticism, experts say that it is in fact social media that is driving the phenomenon.

In one example, on Oct. 15, passers-by were surprised to see a sign hanging by the signatory’s bridge in Zagazig city.

“I’m sorry, Nahla, I swear to God, I love you .. Ahmed,” the sign said in what read like an apology to a lover.

Some members of the community said the signs are just a cheap search for fame rather than a genuine message of love or respect.

Similar signs have been hung in several governorates, including a banner on the main street in Berket El-Sabe’a with the words “Jalal loves Heba, I love you Heba.”

In the province of Beni Suef, a young man wrote on a banner: “The words ‘I love you’ are beautiful. When I hear your voice I am comforted. When I say your name I don't know what happens to me. I love you and I love your mother.”

“This phenomenon has appeared in lots of films, most notably the film ‘Peace and the Snake,’ in 2001,” the community expert Magda Mustafa, said. “Young men want to prove that they are able to do anything and are not ashamed to express their love.”

“In the past, young people were competing face to face, but now the theatrical method is the way to go. 

“We find many men proposing to their loved ones in front of a large crowd, often with a desire to be famous themselves

Media expert Dr. Yasser Thabet said that while the signs appear traditional, they are in fact fueled by social networking sites.

“Social networking sites have a big role in spreading this phenomenon, because the person who does this act wants fame through these sites, which is achieved by multiple people sharing the pictures.”

“Unfortunately, it is false fame. They're just looking to make themselves appear heroic and famous in front of their loved ones.”


Lebanese celebrities join Beirut protests as anger rises over tax reforms

Updated 3 min 38 sec ago

Lebanese celebrities join Beirut protests as anger rises over tax reforms

BEIRUT: Lebanese celebrities joined thousands of protesters on the streets of Beirut on Saturday to voice their anger at the country’s ruling elite.
Singers, actors and playwrights were among a host of high-profile artists who backed demands for action over government corruption and to counter Lebanon’s spiralling economic crisis.
Beirut has been shrouded in smoke for three days following widespread protests and rioting over government tax plans.
A video emerged on social media showing actress Nadine Al-Rassi preparing to set fire to a car tire in downtown Beirut and crying inconsolably about her financial state.
The actress, wearing jeans and her face blackened, told protesters: “I am Nadine Al-Rassi. I was hungry for seven days. I have debts. Banque du Liban (Lebanon’s central bank) seized my house and I am unable to rent a home. Corrupt people should be held responsible.”
Artists also expressed their solidarity with protesters. Actress Nadine Nassib Njeim tweeted her photo in the heart of Beirut: “May God protect our youth, give you strength, grant you victory and be with you. We all stand together against corruption, parties, slogans and robberies.”
In a series of tweets, Lebanese recording artist Elissa, who is abroad, supported the protesters’ demands, saying: “This is the first time I wish I were in Lebanon. My heart is with you.”
In another tweet, the high-profile singer, one of the Middle East’s best-selling performers, said: “I proudly follow the news of Beirut and its citizens ... who are demanding a decent life. It is time for people to get back their dignity.”
Meanwhile, singer and composer Ragheb Alama expressed his dismay at a Council of Ministers plan to impose a daily fee on WhatsApp calls.
“The people’s misfortunes are not funny. Why don’t you tax the polluted air people breathe? It is a great idea that brings money to your fathers’ treasury, too,” he wrote.
Alama accused the Parliament of responsibility for the country’s dire economy: “Why do deputies receive money, privileges and overheads, and what have they done? They covered up for looting and stealing for decades. They are responsible for destroying the economy and the country.”
Nancy Ajram, one of the Arab world’s most popular singers, wrote on Twitter: “My heart goes out to my country every moment and with every heartbeat. We are a people who deserves to live and it is our right to live with dignity. May God protect Lebanon.”
Singer and actress Haifa Wehbe tweeted: “There is nothing better than the Lebanese people when they stand in unity and under one slogan, without any political affiliation. We are all for our country.”
Comedian and prime-time TV host Hisham Haddad was among celebrities who joined protesters at Riad El-Solh Square, near the Prime Minister’s office, site of the biggest centralized demonstrations.
Actress Maguy Bou Ghosn, singer Moeen Shreif, actors Abdo Chahine, Badih Abou Chakra and Junaid Zeineldine, playwright Ziad Itani and musician Ziyad Sahhab also joined the protests.
Actor Wissam Hanna called on Twitter for protesters to close the Beirut Airport road to stop corrupt officials fleeing the country.
“I am all for closing down the airport road to stop thieves from fleeing. I am all for recovering stolen funds. Lebanon rises, revolts and it is time to hold them accountable,” he wrote.
Actress Gretta Aoun said: “We have to take to the streets. They must know the extent of our pain.”