Ancient sport of tent-pegging returns to Saudi Arabia

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In 2015, tent-pegging teams turned from enthusiasts to professionals by participating in a championship in Oman.
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In tent-pegging, a horseman uses lances or swords. The equipment used are standardized pegs with specific thickness, color, size and even angle. (Photos/Supplied)
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Updated 16 November 2018

Ancient sport of tent-pegging returns to Saudi Arabia

  • The revival of a cavalry discipline adds to a number of equestrian events practiced in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: Tent-pegging, an ancient cavalry equestrian sport, is making a return in the Kingdom with the establishment of tent-pegging teams and supporting competitions across the peninsula.
Many believe the sport originated in Central Asia and the Middle East, with top teams such as Egypt, Oman, Iraq, Jordan and Sudan competing in international championships, and Saudi Arabia’s recent participation drawing close attention.
For centuries, Arabs of the Arabian Peninsula and beyond were known for their equestrian skills, which were passed down through generations and recognized on a global scale. Historically renowned, Arabs and horses have shared a bond that helped shape many of today’s equestrian disciplines.
A mounted horseman and a team of four horsemen ride at a gallop and use swords and lances to pierce, pick up and carry away small targets inserted into or placed on the ground.

Saudi enthusiasts
For the past five years, Saudi equestrian enthusiasts have looked to tent-pegging as a rising sport in the region. With proper training and discipline, Saudis — both those with professional equestrian training and those without — have found added value in the sport with many taking part in international championships and tournaments.
Capt. Khalid Al-Suwaiket, founder of the Nomas tent-pegging team and an international judge, became interested in the sport in 2013 and became one of the first Saudis to go through formal intensive training in South Africa, a leader in the sport.
Since the introduction of tent-pegging recently, more people were turning to the sport than anticipated, he said.
“Tent-pegging is a sporting discipline that is one of the oldest in the region. Although show-jumping and polo are more common, it is making its way into the field slowly and professionally,” said Al-Suwaiket.
“There are about 15 teams across the Kingdom, and the numbers are rising. In 2015, tent-pegging teams turned from enthusiasts to professionals by participating in a championship in Oman. Various competitions took place in Al-Ula, Bgaig, Al-Qassim and other areas in Saudi Arabia, and points were gathered on equestrians to find the most qualified to participate in international competitions.”
Lances, swords and revolvers are used in tent-pegging. Each weapon has its own characteristics regulated by the international equestrian tent-pegging association, an international body that oversees competitions and all regulations related to the sport.
The equipment used are standardized pegs with specific thickness, color, size and even angle.
“With proper training, many of our riders were able to compete and find themselves in the top five, at least in some competitions. In my equestrian club, Al-Jawhara Stables, we train everyone and anyone willing to take up the sport. There is no age limit in tent-pegging, no weight limit and not even gender segregation,” said Al-Suwaiket.

Set of rules
“Unlike other equestrian disciplines, the rider takes command of the horse. Each host country provides the horses, unlike other disciplines, and the efficiency of each segment in the tournaments depends on the rider’s performance. Any points deducted or added are due to the performance.”
The sport depends on a specific set of rules that must be considered; the speed of a horse needs to be in a specific timeframe, a precise 60-degree angle of the peg, ring height, the length of a lance and sword as well as smooth finishing.
Each event consists of eight competitions, with a minimum of two runs.
Riders must perform each event as meticulously as possible to gather points. Overall, the four riders’ individual points in all competitions are added together to determine the winning team. Points are deducted if riders do not comply with the speed, the mount, the piercing of the target or other sets of regulations.
A number of young male and female equestrian enthusiasts are participating in various equestrian disciplines offered at the many stables around the Kingdom.


Saudi Arabia’s Alkhobar becomes international role model for business continuity

Sultan Al-Zaidi (L) and Fahad Al-Jubeir.
Updated 21 September 2020

Saudi Arabia’s Alkhobar becomes international role model for business continuity

  • Alkhobar has pushed for a paperless municipality and emphasized the introduction of online services for residents

JEDDAH: Alkhobar municipality, along with Europe’s largest industrial manufacturing company Siemens, has been hailed as a role model for management excellence and business continuity.
The municipality has been awarded international certification for its excellence in managing crises and risks under difficult circumstances, in recognition of its administrative achievements during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Quality Austria (QA) awarded Alkhobar Municipality and Siemens with ISO 22301 and ISO 9001 certificates, which are concerned with business continuity management, especially during the pandemic.
ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is an independent and nongovernmental body. Its standards are internationally agreed by experts and are seen as the best way of doing something.
Alkhobar has pushed for a paperless municipality and emphasized the introduction of online services for residents.
Its mayor, Sultan bin Hamid Al-Zaidi, said that the municipality’s ISO achievement was in line with achieving the goals of the Eastern Province municipality. He added that the aim was to make Alkhobar a distinguished city, like other places in the province.
The Mayor of the Eastern Province, Fahad bin Mohammed Al-Jubeir, said that municipalities were keen to implement the most advanced administrative systems and provide the best services to beneficiaries.
“This comes in line with the objectives of municipal transformation, part of the National Transformation Program 2020 of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 reform plan which states that the Kingdom, with its outputs and services, should provide an international role model of quality and mastery, and raise the level of services provided by services and economic development agencies and enterprises,” Al-Jubeir told Arab News.

HIGHLIGHT

Business continuity was primarily done through strategic planning and taking into account the different local factors and needs of provinces and municipalities.

He added that the municipality had launched initiatives and programs seeking to make the Eastern Province and its governorates pioneers in administrative and service qualities, as well as improving public services.
According to QA’s regional manager, Dr. Mohamed Hassan, business continuity was primarily done through strategic planning and taking into account the different local factors and needs of provinces and municipalities.
“These instructions are then transformed into applicable programs and strategies at the amana (provincial government) level,” he wrote in an article. “Since the Eastern Province is, in this respect, the leading province in the Kingdom, the guidelines are finalized in consultation with the EP’s mayor, Fahad Al-Jubeir.”
The article gave examples of Alkhobar’s strategic emergency plans and said it had made arrangements with companies such as Al-Yamama for the prevention of damage from flash floods or storms.
It added that other public contractors, such as Nabatat, ensured that green spaces and parks in the city remained relaxing destinations for people, even on exceptionally hot summer days.
“A successful example of service digitization is the Balady software, which makes all municipality services available to citizens online. Moreover, the Balagat software offers a service in which complaints and suggestions from citizens can be reported and followed up online,” the article said. “If a complaint is not solved within 24 hours, it is automatically forwarded to the mayor of the Eastern Province, Al-Jubeir.”
The ministry’s foresight in initiating plans and preparations, the online software systems used and the high-quality standards in the municipality all helped in increasing the effectiveness of the business continuity management system.