Three Spanish climbers, guide, perish on Peru mountain

The five-member party was attempting to scale the 5,150 meter Nevado Mateo mountain in the Andean Cordillera Blanca range when they were swept away. (Reuters)
Updated 07 January 2019

Three Spanish climbers, guide, perish on Peru mountain

  • A mountain rescue team had been dispatched to recover the bodies of the four climbers
  • The alarm was raised by another Spanish climber, the only member of the party to survive

LIMA: Three Spanish mountaineers died with their Peruvian guide while climbing a snow-capped peak in the Andes, Peruvian authorities reported Monday.
The five-member party was attempting to scale the 5,150 meter (16,892-foot) Nevado Mateo mountain in the Andean Cordillera Blanca range when they were swept away on Sunday, authorities in the Ancash region said.
The alarm was raised by another Spanish climber, the only member of the party to survive.
“Apparently it was due to weather effects, probably an ice-fall,” Marcos Espinal, a prosecutor in the local town of Carhauz, told RPP radio.
A mountain rescue team had been dispatched to recover the bodies of the four climbers, Espinal said.
The lower reaches of the mountain give way to a glacier on the climb, which usually takes around five hours.
“It is a rugged area, and risky because of the weather conditions,” like fog and rain, he said.
A German climber died on the mountain in 2016.


Morocco, Spain to hold talks about overlapping territorial waters

Updated 25 January 2020

Morocco, Spain to hold talks about overlapping territorial waters

  • The territorial waters Morocco has claimed include the coast off Western Sahar
  • The territory has been contested between Morocco and the Algerian-backed Polisario Front since the Spanish colonial period ended in 1975

RABAT: The Moroccan and Spanish foreign ministers said on Friday their countries would hold talks about overlapping areas of ocean that they both claim rights to in the North Atlantic.
The territorial waters Morocco has claimed include the coast off Western Sahara, a territory that has been contested between Morocco and the Algerian-backed Polisario Front since the Spanish colonial period ended in 1975.
Morocco’s parliament passed two bills this week to give domestic legal cover to a coastal area the North African country already controls, causing concern in Spain’s Canary Islands, where the government warned of overlaps with Spanish territorial waters.
Morocco’s foreign minister Nasser Bourita said that defining territorial waters was a “sovereign right” and that his country aimed to upgrade domestic law in compliance with the UN law of the sea convention.
“In case of overlaps, international law requires states to negotiate,” said Bourita following talks with his Spanish peer, Arancha Gonzalez Laya.
“Morocco rejects unilateral acts and fait accompli,” he said, adding that Spain was a “strategic partner” and Morocco’s largest trading partner.
Gonzalez Laya said Morocco’s willingness to negotiate “reassures the Canary Islands.”
“Morocco is a source of stability for Spain,” she said, citing “close cooperation” in the fight against jihadists and illegal migration.