Japan likely to revise proposed budget due to wage-data errors

Labor ministry officials have admitted issuing monthly wage data without meeting sampling standards for years. (AFP)
Updated 11 January 2019

Japan likely to revise proposed budget due to wage-data errors

  • The data error has caused the ministry to underestimate payments made under Japan’s employment insurance program
  • Labor ministry officials admitted issuing monthly wage data without meeting sampling standards for years

TOKYO: Japan’s government is likely to revise its budget draft for the next fiscal year to pay for a shortfall of employment insurance benefits caused by errors in the country’s wage data, Finance Minister Taro Aso said on Friday.
The likely budget revision — a rare move — would follow the revelation that the labor ministry miscalculated workers’ average wages for years.
The data error has caused the ministry to underestimate payments made under Japan’s employment insurance program, which includes unemployment benefits, and another insurance covering compensation for workplace accidents.
Labor ministry officials admitted on Wednesday that they have issued monthly wage data without meeting sampling standards for years, hurting the credibility of a key gauge of the success of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s economic policies.
“Economic indicators provide the basis for decision on fiscal and economic policies and they must always be accurate,” Aso told reporters after a cabinet meeting. “It’s very regrettable that the wages data will be recompiled.”
Aso said the wage data flaw has caused the labor ministry to underestimate benefits for employment insurance and workpeople’s accident insurance. As a result, it needs to pay for additional benefits to make up for past shortfalls by adding necessary funds to the budget for the fiscal year to begin April 1.
“It’s highly likely that the budget draft will be revised,” Aso said, adding that the amount of extra spending has not been fixed yet.
In compiling the monthly data, which covers some 33,000 firms with five or more full-time employees, the labor ministry is supposed to collect samples from all the companies that employ 500 or more workers.
But it turned out that the data sampling failed to cover two-thirds of some 1,400 businesses in Tokyo for an unspecified period of time, ministry officials said. Domestic media reported the sampling error extends back for 15 years.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said on Friday the government would examine all economic indicators.
The budget draft was compiled in December and was due to be sent to the parliament later this month for approval before April 1.
Abe’s cabinet last month approved a record ¥101.5 trillion ($937.12 billion) annual budget draft, featuring spending to offset the pain of a planned sales tax hike scheduled for October.


HSBC France to leave its Champs Elysees headquarters

Updated 2 min 26 sec ago

HSBC France to leave its Champs Elysees headquarters

  • HSBC France has a project of moving its headquarters by 2020 to 38 av Kleber
  • The building would be fit for 1,200 employees working mostly in corporate and investment banking and wealth management

PARIS/LONDON: HSBC France said on Wednesday its teams will leave a prestigious headquarters on Paris' Champs Elysees avenue by 2020 in an emblematic move ahead of the planned sale of its retail business in the country.
The exit and planned sale, following a strategic review of the group's French retail activities, are part of a broader cost-cutting effort under interim Chief Executive Noel Quinn.
"HSBC France has a project of moving its headquarters by 2020 to 38 av Kleber, 500 meters away from its actual headquarters that was sold in 2010," the bank said in a statement.
The building would be fit for 1,200 employees working mostly in corporate and investment banking and wealth management.
Another 500 employees will be moved to HSBC's hub in La Defense business district which now houses 4,000 of the bank's employees and to branches close to the Champs Elysees building.
HSBC France sold its headquarters at 103 avenue Champs Elysees, and a building in front of it at 15 rue Vernet, to Qatari investors and has rented them since then.
The move is necessitated because the owner wants to regain control of the buildings and also because HSBC needs to save money, a source familiar with the matter said on Wednesday.
Office rents in Paris are rising to levels not seen since at least 2003, according to Immostat data, as vacancy rates are at record lows.
HSBC inherited the historic headquarters when it bought the French retail operations of Crédit Commercial de France (CCF) in 2000.
At the beginning of the 20th century, the building was a hotel where World War One spy and exotic dancer Mata Hari was arrested.
HSBC Holdings has hired U.S. investment bank Lazard Ltd to sell its French retail business, a source close to the matter told Reuters on Tuesday.
Quinn is expected to unveil the first details of his strategic overhaul of the bank when it reports third-quarter earnings on Oct. 28.
Quinn is auditioning for the full-time CEO job and insiders said he is under pressure to take decisive action after Chairman Mark Tucker indicated his predecessor John Flint had not moved quickly enough to turn around the lender's performance.