Taiwan leader Tsai Ing-wen tours Pacific allies, with Hawaii stopover

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen will visit Palau, Nauru and the Marshall Islands and then transit through Hawaii on her way back home. (Reuters)
Updated 21 March 2019

Taiwan leader Tsai Ing-wen tours Pacific allies, with Hawaii stopover

  • Taiwan has struggled to shore up its dwindling roster of allies as countries are choosing instead to establish relations with Beijing
  • Beijing considers the self-governing island part of Chinese territory

BEIJING: Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen left Thursday on a tour of diplomatic allies in the Pacific that will end with a stopover in Hawaii.
Taiwan has struggled to shore up its dwindling roster of allies as countries are choosing instead to establish relations with Beijing, which considers the self-governing island part of Chinese territory.
Tsai will visit Palau, Nauru and the Marshall Islands, Taiwan’s official Central News Agency reported.
The agency said she will transit through Hawaii on March 27 on her way back from the Marshall Islands, but did not give further details.
Only 17 mainly small, developing countries still recognize Taiwan as a sovereign nation. The island split from mainland China amid a civil war in 1949. Beijing has recently ratcheted up its rhetoric around “re-unifying” democratically governed Taiwan with Communist Party-ruled mainland China.
China is particularly sensitive to cooperation between Taiwan and the US When the latter approved the sale of $330 million of military equipment to Taiwan last September, China warned of “severe damage” to bilateral relations.
Ahead of a similar stopover in Hawaii in 2017, China demanded that the US bar Tsai from transiting through in order to “avoid sending any erroneous messages to the Taiwan independence force.”


Greece moves more migrants to mainland as arrivals increase

Updated 10 min 12 sec ago

Greece moves more migrants to mainland as arrivals increase

  • Some 697 migrants and refugees arrived in the port of Elefsina near Athens from the island of Samos
  • Greece is struggling with the biggest resurgence in refugee and migrant flows across the Aegean Sea from Turkey since 2015

ATHENS: Authorities in Greece moved more asylum-seekers to the mainland on Tuesday as part of a strategy to reduce the refugee population on outlying islands after an increase in arrivals in recent months.

Some 697 migrants and refugees arrived in the port of Elefsina near Athens from the island of Samos, officials said. Earlier, 120 people arrived from Lesbos.

Greece is struggling with the biggest resurgence in refugee and migrant flows across the Aegean Sea from Turkey since 2015, when more than a million crossed into Europe, many of them via Greece.

The islands, which are closest to Turkey, have been struggling under the influx, with some 33,700 refugees and migrants in overcrowded camps, according to the UN refugee agency UNHCR.

In late September, a woman died in a fire in a tent in a camp on Lesbos, while another fire in a severely overcrowded camp in Samos forced hundreds of people into the streets this month.

“Our focus was mainly on Samos because we want things there to calm down,” migration ministry secretary Manos Logothetis told Reuters.

More than 12,000 people arrived in Greece in September, the highest level in the three-and-a-half years since the EU agreed a deal with Turkey to seal the Aegean corridor to Europe.

Logothetis said up to 300 more people would be leaving Samos this week, and up to 2,000 from all outlying islands next week. Greece aims to move up to 20,000 off the islands by the end of the year, he said.

Athens has announced a stricter migration policy to deal with the crisis, including plans to deport 10,000 people who do not qualify for asylum by the end of next year.