Fake News Watch: Reports of a theft have been greatly exaggerated…

The Kuwait City skyline. The Kuwaiti Health Ministry said that it will take all the necessary measures to track down those who promoted an incident of fake news. (Reuters)
Updated 23 April 2019

Fake News Watch: Reports of a theft have been greatly exaggerated…

  • The Kuwaiti Health Ministry has denied reports circulated on social media claiming that the human organs of a dead Egyptian resident had been stolen
  • The Egyptian Ministry for Immigration has denied rumors claiming that Egyptians living abroad were allowed to vote online in a referendum on constitutional amendments

1. Kuwait denies “human organs theft” rumors on social media
The Kuwaiti Health Ministry has denied reports circulated on social media claiming that the human organs of a dead Egyptian resident had been stolen.
The rumors claimed that the organs of an Egyptian resident were stolen from a mortuary at the Al Sabah medical area.
A press release issued by the ministry said that the reports were fake and baseless, adding that such rumors negatively reflect on the reputation of Kuwait’s health sector.
The ministry said that it will take all the necessary measures to track down those who promoted the fake news.

2. Egypt ministry puts record straight on expat vote
The Egyptian Ministry for Immigration has denied rumors claiming that Egyptians living abroad were allowed to vote online in a referendum on constitutional amendments.
Social media users had earlier debated whether the vote for Egyptians abroad can be cast electronically. In a statement, the ministry cited the National Electoral Commission as saying there would be no such electronic vote on the constitutional amendments.


TWITTER POLL: Wearing masks to be a norm even with availability of coronavirus vaccine

Updated 12 July 2020

TWITTER POLL: Wearing masks to be a norm even with availability of coronavirus vaccine

DUBAI: The World Health Organization has advised on the use of medical masks as to limit the spread of certain respiratory viral diseases, including COVID-19.

“Current information suggests that the two main routes of transmission of the COVID-19 virus are respiratory droplets and contact,” the global health body said in its advisory.

Masks can be used either for protection by healthy persons – to protect themselves from transmission – or by infected individuals to prevent onward transmission.

 

 

The WHO likewise advised that governments should encourage the wearing of masks where there is widespread transmission and physical distancing is difficult, especially that a vaccine for coronavirus has yet to be developed that could offer protection to individuals.

Wearing masks have become a norm that even the availability of a vaccine in the future would not deter almost half of Arab News readers that were polled – at 46.6 percent – compared with those who said they will ditch these protections – at 29 percent – once a coronavirus inoculation goes into market.

Almost a quarter of those that were polled meanwhile said they did not mind either way.

Reader @KaysarRoni said face masks is essential when going to the market, to shop or to pray in the mosques, but would be “harmful for health” when worn all the time.