US air strike kills 13 Daesh fighters in Somalia

Al Shabaab soldiers sit outside a building during patrol along the streets of Dayniile district in Southern Mogadishu. (File/Reuters)
Updated 10 May 2019

US air strike kills 13 Daesh fighters in Somalia

  • The US military has stepped up its campaign of air strikes in Somalia since President Donald Trump took office, saying it has killed more than 800 militants in two years
  • Somalia has been mired in civil war and an extremist insurgency since 1991 when clan warlords overthrew a dictator and then turned on each other

NAIROBI: A US air strike killed 13 Daesh fighters in Somalia’s semi-autonomous Puntland region on Wednesday, the US military said, days after another strike killed three.
The US military has stepped up its campaign of air strikes in Somalia since President Donald Trump took office, saying it has killed more than 800 militants in two years.
Daesh has gathered recruits in Puntland, although experts say the scale of its force is unclear and it remains a small player compared Al-Qaeda-linked Al-Shabab group that once controlled much of Somalia.
US Africa Command (AFRICOM) said late on Thursday the latest strike targeted an Daesh-Somalia camp in Golis Mountains.
“At this time, it is assessed the air strike on May 8 killed 13 terrorists,” it said.
AFRICOM said in April it had killed Abdulhakim Dhuqub, identifying him as Daesh’s deputy leader in Somalia.
Somalia has been mired in civil war and an extremist insurgency since 1991 when clan warlords overthrew a dictator and then turned on each other.
Al Shabab was pushed out of the capital Mogadishu in 2011, but retains a strong presence in parts of southern and central Somalia and has often clashed with Daesh.


Morocco, Spain to hold talks about overlapping territorial waters

Updated 25 January 2020

Morocco, Spain to hold talks about overlapping territorial waters

  • The territorial waters Morocco has claimed include the coast off Western Sahar
  • The territory has been contested between Morocco and the Algerian-backed Polisario Front since the Spanish colonial period ended in 1975

RABAT: The Moroccan and Spanish foreign ministers said on Friday their countries would hold talks about overlapping areas of ocean that they both claim rights to in the North Atlantic.
The territorial waters Morocco has claimed include the coast off Western Sahara, a territory that has been contested between Morocco and the Algerian-backed Polisario Front since the Spanish colonial period ended in 1975.
Morocco’s parliament passed two bills this week to give domestic legal cover to a coastal area the North African country already controls, causing concern in Spain’s Canary Islands, where the government warned of overlaps with Spanish territorial waters.
Morocco’s foreign minister Nasser Bourita said that defining territorial waters was a “sovereign right” and that his country aimed to upgrade domestic law in compliance with the UN law of the sea convention.
“In case of overlaps, international law requires states to negotiate,” said Bourita following talks with his Spanish peer, Arancha Gonzalez Laya.
“Morocco rejects unilateral acts and fait accompli,” he said, adding that Spain was a “strategic partner” and Morocco’s largest trading partner.
Gonzalez Laya said Morocco’s willingness to negotiate “reassures the Canary Islands.”
“Morocco is a source of stability for Spain,” she said, citing “close cooperation” in the fight against jihadists and illegal migration.