Farah Nabulsi: Palestinian investment banker turned activist filmmaker shines light on Nakba

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Born and raised in the UK to Palestinian parents, Farah Nabulsi studied business in London and became an institutional equity stock broker at JP Morgan Chase before turning to film. (Supplied)
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Born and raised in the UK to Palestinian parents, Farah Nabulsi studied business in London and became an institutional equity stock broker at JP Morgan Chase before turning to film. (Supplied)
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Born and raised in the UK to Palestinian parents, Farah Nabulsi studied business in London and became an institutional equity stock broker at JP Morgan Chase before turning to film. (Supplied)
Updated 15 May 2019

Farah Nabulsi: Palestinian investment banker turned activist filmmaker shines light on Nakba

  • British-Palestinian filmmaker has not looked back since swapping her business suits and briefcases for cameras and film scripts

DUBAI: Farah Nabulsi had started out on a clear career path. Born and raised in the UK to Palestinian parents, she studied business in London and became an institutional equity stock broker at JP Morgan Chase.
But life changed totally, she said, after she visited Palestine and witnessed the everyday indignities that Palestinians endure.
“It hit me like a ton of bricks how colossal this injustice is, and how 1948 is happening right now in the present day,” Nabulsi told Arab News, referring to the exodus of several hundred thousand Palestinians when Israel was established on their homeland.
“That experience and first-hand knowledge changed me. I knew that charity and sympathy were certainly not enough.”

Nabulsi swapped her business suits and briefcases for cameras and film scripts. She took it upon herself to shed light on the injustices meted out to Palestinians since their mass displacement in 1948, known to Palestinians as the Nakba (Arabic for catastrophe).
“With one foot in the West — having been born, raised and educated in London — and the other — my heritage, the blood running through my veins — in Palestine, I recognized the unique and rather powerful position I was in, so I changed the trajectory of my life,” she said.
The change was a big one, but the British-Palestinian filmmaker has not looked back ever since, saying the shift has been “absolutely liberating.”

So far, Nabulsi has made three short films on Palestine. One of them, “Today They Took My Son,” follows a mother as she copes with the trauma of her young son being taken away by the Israeli military.
It was named an Official Selection at the Edinburgh Short Film Festival in 2016, and was a finalist at the International Short Film Competition at the USA Film Festival in 2017.
The other films, “Oceans of Injustice” and “Nightmare of Gaza,” have similar themes of Israeli prejudices against, and abuses of, Palestinians.


“What I do is painful, raw and exhausting. But the satisfaction that I’m doing something with meaning — giving voice to the silenced, playing my part in informing and educating with the aim of ending injustice, and being able to use my creativity and my emotional IQ while doing that — has been a blessing I’m truly grateful for,” Nabulsi said.
“I have children of my own, and the very idea of a child being taken — usually in the middle of the night by armed soldiers, with no parent or adult with them, processed through a military system and subjected to all sorts of abuses — is just insane,” she added. “That (‘Today They Took My Son’) was a film I didn’t choose to make. I had to make it.”

Nabulsi is working on her fourth short film, “The Present,” which features Israeli-Palestinian actor Saleh Bakri.
“It’s a beautiful story of a Palestinian father and his young daughter dealing with the indignities of checkpoints,” she said. “I’m looking forward to completing it and sharing it with the world.”


Quoz Arts Fest returns to Alserkal Avenue featuring regional talents

Quoz Arts Fest is held on Jan. 24 and 25 in the UAE’s Alserkal Avenue. (Supplied)
Updated 24 January 2020

Quoz Arts Fest returns to Alserkal Avenue featuring regional talents

  • During the festival, visitors will be able to bring their creative designs to life on stone or camel leather at the high-end footwear brand Tamashee’s workshop
  • The program includes a free concert by Jordanian-Palestinian band 47Soul, the exhibition “New National Dish: UAE,” Reel Palestine Film Festival screenings, a contemporary dance performance by Sima Dance Company, and much more

DUBAI: More than 60 creatives will lead the two-day Quoz Arts Fest held on Jan. 24 and 25 in the UAE’s Alserkal Avenue, which will feature exhibitions, live music, contemporary dance performances, food trucks, outdoor art installations, film screenings, and educational seminars.

During the festival, visitors will be able to bring their creative designs to life on stone or camel leather at the high-end footwear brand Tamashee’s workshop, which explores the “contemporary application of ancient art and Arabian scripts of the Peninsula.”

Visitors will be able to bring their creative designs to life on stone or camel leather at the high-end footwear brand Tamashee’s workshop. (Supplied)

Tamashee, owned by Saudi entrepreneur Muneera Al Tamimi and Emirati Mohammed Kazim, will give visitors a chance to participate in a 12,000-year-old form of expression at heir activation wall, inspired by their “1441 H” collection, which references archeology, rock art, and ancient inscriptions of the Arabian Peninsula.

In its eighth edition, the festival explores the theme “In Search Of…,” with special programs including a free concert by Jordanian-Palestinian band 47Soul, the exhibition “New National Dish: UAE,” Reel Palestine Film Festival screenings, a contemporary dance performance by Sima Dance Company, and much more.

47Soul, who will take the stage in The Yard, on Jan. 24, combines traditional Dabke music with electronic beats. The band is best-known for creating the Shamstep, a combination of mijwiz–a Levantine folk musical style– and dubstep.

47Soul, who will take the stage in The Yard, on Jan. 24, combines traditional Dabke music with electronic beats. (Supplied)

The “New National Dish: UAE” exhibition presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change.

Visitors to the exhibition will get to try the food and discuss the future of popular dishes.

The “New National Dish: UAE” exhibition presents four imagined proposals for a new Emirati national dish, based on the environmental, economic and social impacts of climate change. (Supplied) 

The contemporary dance performance Ansaf, set to take place on Jan. 24, is created by acclaimed Palestinian choreographer Alaa Krimed and explores questions and concepts facing the Arab world.