Philippines’ defense department team to investigate case of missing Saudi student pilot

Missing Saudi student pilot Abdullah Khalid Al-Sharif
Updated 07 July 2019

Philippines’ defense department team to investigate case of missing Saudi student pilot

  • 23-year-old Abdullah Khalid Al-Sharif and his instructor went missing while on a training flight in the central Philippines

MANILA: The Philippines’ Department of National Defense (DND) said on Friday that it will conduct a separate investigation into the case of a Saudi aviation student who went missing while on a training flight in Occidental Mindoro.

This was upon the request of Saudi Ambassador to the Philippines Dr. Abdullah Al-Bussairy.

“We are doing our own (investigation),” Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said in an interview on the sidelines of the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines (FOCAP) 45th anniversary photo exhibit and commemorative event titled “Snapshots of History” at The Gallery in Makati City.

Lorenzana was referring to the case of 23-year-old Abdullah Khalid Al-Sharif, who disappeared along with his flying instructor Capt. Jose Nelson Yapparcon on May 17.

“I had a meeting with the Saudi ambassador last week, the reason being that according to him they were able to uncover some documents that may help in bringing closure to the accident,” Lorenzana said.

“The Saudi national is a student, he was with a pilot (instructor), there’s two of them and the plane is somewhere in the coast off Mindoro (Occidental). Nothing was recovered, not even the plane or anything,” he added.

On speculation that Al-Sharif could be a victim of kidnapping, the defense chief said that that was one of the theories raised by the Saudi envoy.

“That is why they want another investigation aside from the official one to bring closure to the accident,” Lorenzana said.

The Saudi ambassador, Lorenzana said, “wanted the DND to conduct another investigation using these documents to ascertain what really happened to that ill-fated trainer plane so that the family of the student pilot can put closure to this case.”

 

 


Saudi investment chiefs host students from one of world’s top business schools

Updated 26 January 2020

Saudi investment chiefs host students from one of world’s top business schools

  • The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) hosted business major students from Harvard Business School (HBS) for a conference held at the capital’s King Abdullah Financial District

Riyadh: Saudi mega projects and regional and global investment opportunities were outlined to students from one of the world’s top business schools at a seminar in Riyadh.

The Saudi Public Investment Fund (PIF) hosted business major students from Harvard Business School (HBS) for a conference held at the capital’s King Abdullah Financial District.

As well as being introduced to the PIF, the visitors were briefed about ongoing mega projects, along with potential future investment plans both locally and throughout the world.

During their Saudi trip, some of the students took the chance to see for themselves evidence of the reforms taking place in the Kingdom by visiting Riyadh, Jeddah, and AlUla and exploring the Red Sea coast by car.

The PIF hosted the students as part of its aim of providing exposure to the broadest possible portfolio of businesses and careers while striving to be an employer of choice for top talents domestically and globally.

The fund continues to focus its commitment and dedication in providing a learning culture that promotes partnerships and training with world-class learning institutions, by actively incentivizing professional development and certifications.

HBS is an example of PIF efforts to build relationships with highly recognized learning organizations, and links in with its prestigious graduate development program to attract and develop top Saudi talent.

The study/work development program is delivered in partnership with some of the world’s top educational institutions, offering only 80 seats per application cycle. In 2019, only a fraction of the 12,000 applicants were accepted, and the PIF has attracted several Saudi HBS graduates as part of its human capital.

It is hoped that the visit to Saudi Arabia will encourage some of the HBS students to carry out their own research on the Kingdom to benefit sectors and resources such as the geology of Saudi deserts, Red Sea oceanography, and the sociology of its citizens.

By getting a close-up insight into the Kingdom it is also envisaged that students will return to the country as tourists, investors or for employment.