Philippine police chief resigns amid drug allegations

In this Oct. 3, 2019, file photo, Philippine National Police chief Gen. Oscar Albayalde gestures as he testifies at the resumption of the Senate probe on the release of hundreds of convicts under the shortened serving of their sentence for good behavior, in suburban Pasay city, south of Manila, Philippines. (AP)
Updated 14 October 2019

Philippine police chief resigns amid drug allegations

  • Albayalde resigned about three weeks before his scheduled retirement on Nov. 8

MANILA, Philippines: The Philippine national police chief has resigned after he faced allegations in a Senate hearing that he intervened as a provincial police chief in 2013 to prevent his officers from being prosecuted for allegedly selling a huge quantity of seized drugs.
Gen. Oscar Albayalde said Monday his decision relinquishing his post was accepted by Interior Secretary Eduardo Ano over the weekend but insisted on his innocence, saying he has never been criminally or administratively charged for the alleged irregularity. Albayalde resigned about three weeks before his scheduled retirement on Nov. 8.
The allegations against Albayalde were the latest dark cloud to loom over the national police force, which has largely been enforcing President Rodrigo Duterte’s bloody anti-drug crackdown that has left thousands of mostly petty drug suspects dead.


US will allow limited flights by Chinese airlines, not a ban

Updated 1 min 5 sec ago

US will allow limited flights by Chinese airlines, not a ban

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration said Friday it will let Chinese airlines operate a limited number of flights to the US, backing down from a a threat to ban the flights.
The decision comes one day after China agreed to ease its own anti-coronavirus restrictions and allow more flights by foreign airlines. The restrictions had blocked US carriers United and Delta from resuming flights between the US and China.
The Transportation Department said it will let Chinese passenger airlines fly a total of two round-trip flights per week between the US and China, which it said would equal the number of flights China’s aviation authority will allow for US carriers.
On Wednesday, the US said it would prohibit all flights by Chinese airlines to and from the US no later than June 16. That marked an escalation of trade and diplomatic tension between the two countries.
Four Chinese airlines currently fly between the US and China.
United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines suspended competing flights early this year as demand plummeted in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. United and Delta had petitioned China to resume flights this month. American does not plan to return to China before October.