Get the scoop on President Putin’s delicious lunch menu in Saudi Arabia

Russian President Vladimir Putin arrived in Riyadh on Monday in his first visit since 2007. (SPA)
Updated 14 October 2019

Get the scoop on President Putin’s delicious lunch menu in Saudi Arabia

DUBAI: Russian President Vladimir Putin arrived in Riyadh on Monday in his first visit since 2007, and was welcomed to Al-Yamamah Palace by Saudi King Salman as well as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Russian president sat down to a sumptuous lunch banquet after being welcomed off his plane at King Khalid International Airport by Riyadh Governor Prince Faisal bin Bandar.

And what did the leader of Russia enjoy while in Saudi Arabia? We got the inside scoop on what was served up at the decadent luncheon.




We got the inside scoop on what was served up at the decadent luncheon. (Arab News)

To start things off, diners enjoyed a variety of hot and cold appetizers, which were followed up with a choice of three main courses.

Guests were invited to choose between smoked salmon with asparagus and balsamic sauce, chicken breasts stuffed with a creamy concoction of saffron, turmeric and vegetables and deliciously soft wagyu beef served with purple carrots, orange fruit sauce and a delicate garnish of mountain flowers.

And that wasn’t all — to show off the best Saudi Arabia has to offer, President Putin was also treated to a selection of traditional Saudi dishes, which guests could sample at their leisure.




The Russian president sat down to a sumptuous lunch banquet after being welcomed off his plane. (Arab News) 

Sweet-toothed diners then had their moment of glory as the dessert course was served up.

Chocolate mousse with fresh mangos and mango coulis was served alongside a tarte cranberry ice cream — a fun twist on the usual pairing of chocolate and vanilla ice cream.

And for those who wanted a healthier alternative, a variety of fresh fruits were offered to guests.  


Film Review: Charlie’s Angels punch through the glass ceiling

The reboot stars Ella Balinska, Kristin Stewart and Naomi Scott (L-R). Supplied
Updated 16 November 2019

Film Review: Charlie’s Angels punch through the glass ceiling

  • In a way, the women’s exploits remind you of a James Bond thriller with unbelievable gadgets and car chases
  • With a budget of around $50 million, Banks has created a movie that will lend itself to several sequels

CHENNAI: With the #MeToo movement in full swing, “Charlie’s Angels” seems to fit in splendidly. Admittedly, the Angels have been around for over four decades. Their plots to rid the world of crime and conspiracies began in 1976 with an ABC television show that led to two feature films in 2000 and 2003 with Drew Barrymore, Cameron Diaz and Lucy Liu playing the Angels. With the most angelic of expressions, they gave a hard time to law-breakers — punching and kicking their way to success. But a television reboot in 2011 of the franchise was ripped apart. So, it must have taken enormous guts for Elizabeth Banks to write, produce and act in the latest version, alongside Kristin Stewart, Naomi Scott and Ella Balinska.

The Angels receive a tough assignment — neutralizing a device called Calisto, an environmentally friendly energy source that, in the wrong hands, could cause immense destruction. And when it is discovered that the gadget will be sold to a criminal, Sabina (Stewart), Jane (Balinska) and Elena (Scott) undertake the most perilous of missions.

In a way, the women’s exploits remind you of a James Bond thriller with unbelievable gadgets and car chases. And for all one knows, the Angels may strengthen the case for a female Bond.

But what is most interesting is that Banks refrains from turning her Angels into objects of titillation. Unlike the protagonists in the earlier editions of the franchise who wore revealing clothes and pretended to be ditzy to please their boyfriends (with Diaz famously dancing in skimpy outfits to distract the male gaze in the 2000 movie), Sabina, Jane and Elena do nothing of the sort.

With a budget of around $50 million, Banks has created a movie that will lend itself to several sequels, and shooting mostly in Turkey and Germany, she has also tried to capture an international audience by introducing a Turkish-Muslim character, Fatimah (Marie-Lou Sellem).

Gripping to the core and brilliantly photographed and edited, ultimately this is a movie that does little to objectify women, but also doesn’t force the viewer to think too hard. Easy entertainment for the world of today.