Jordan calls on Israel to release woman on hunger strike

Heba Al-Labadi was arrested Aug. 20 and has been on a hunger strike since Sept. 26. (Twitter/@hebalabadigmai1)
Updated 16 October 2019

Jordan calls on Israel to release woman on hunger strike

  • Heba Al-Labadi was arrested Aug. 20 at the Allenby Bridge
  • She is being held in administrative detention without formal charges

AMMAN: Jordan is calling on Israel to release a Jordanian woman detained for over a month without trial on security charges.
Heba Ahmed Al-Labadi’s attorney said Wednesday that she was arrested Aug. 20 at the Allenby Bridge crossing (also known as the Al-Karameh crossing) between Jordan and the Israeli-occupied West Bank and has been on a hunger strike since Sept. 26.
Al-Labadi, 32, who is of Palestinian descent, is being held in “administrative detention,” an Israeli policy that permits detaining people for months without formal charges.
Israel’s Shin Bet internal security agency says she is detained “because of suspicion of her involvement in serious security violations,” without elaborating.
Jordan’s Foreign Ministry says the hunger strike “makes the need for her immediate release more urgent.”
Jordan and Egypt are the only Arab countries to have made peace with Israel.


UN agency: Iran violating all restrictions of nuclear deal

Updated 57 min 57 sec ago

UN agency: Iran violating all restrictions of nuclear deal

  • Iran signed the nuclear deal in 2015 with the United States, Germany, France, Britain, China and Russia
  • Known as the JCPOA, it allows Iran only to keep a stockpile of 202.8 kilograms

VIENNA: Iran has continued to increase its stockpiles of enriched uranium and remains in violation of its deal with world powers, the United Nations' atomic watchdog said Friday.
The International Atomic Energy Agency reported the finding in a confidential document distributed to member countries and seen by The Associated Press.
The agency said that as of May 20, Iran’s total stockpile of low-enriched uranium amounted to 1,571.6 kilograms (1.73 tons), up from 1,020.9 kilograms (1.1 tons) on Feb. 19.
Iran signed the nuclear deal in 2015 with the United States, Germany, France, Britain, China and Russia. Known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, it allows Iran only to keep a stockpile of 202.8 kilograms (447 pounds).
The US pulled out of the deal unilaterally in 2018.
The IAEA reported that Iran has also been continuing to enrich uranium to a purity of 4.5%, higher than the 3.67% allowed under the JCPOA. It is also above the pact's limitations on heavy water.
The nuclear deal promised Iran economic incentives in return for the curbs on its nuclear program. Since President Donald Trump pulled the US out of the deal, Iran has been slowly violating the restrictions.
The ultimate goal of the JCPOA is to prevent Iran from developing a nuclear bomb — something that Tehran says it does not want to do. It has been open about the violations and continues to allow IAEA inspectors access to its facilities to monitor their operations.
It is now in violation of all restrictions outlined by the JCPOA, which Tehran says it hopes will pressure the other nations involved to increase economic incentives to make up for hard-hitting sanctions imposed by Washington after the US withdrawal.
Though Iran has been hard hit by the new coronavirus pandemic, the IAEA said it has maintained its verification and monitoring activities in the country, primarily by chartering aircraft to fly inspectors to and from Iran.
It cited “exceptional cooperation” from authorities in Austria, where it is based, and Iran in facilitating the operation.