Turkey captures sister of slain Daesh leader Baghdadi in northern Syria

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Rasmiya Awad, believed to be the sister of slain Daesh leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who was captured on Monday in the northern Syrian town of Azaz by Turkish security officials, is seen in an unknown location in an undated picture provided by Turkish security officials. (Reuters)
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A man, believed to be the husband of Rasmiya Awad, sister of slain Daesh leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who was captured on Monday in the northern Syrian town of Azaz by Turkish security officials is seen in an unknown location in an undated picture provided by Turkish security officials. (Reuters)
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A woman, believed to be the daughter-in-law of Rasmiya Awad, sister of slain Daesh leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who was captured on Monday in the northern Syrian town of Azaz by Turkish security officials, is seen in an unknown location in an undated picture provided by Turkish security officials. (Reuters)
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Late Daesh leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is seen in an undated picture released by the U.S. Department of Defense in Washington, U.S. October 30, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 05 November 2019

Turkey captures sister of slain Daesh leader Baghdadi in northern Syria

  • Many Daesh members have escaped through smuggling routes to northwestern Syria in the final days of battle ahead of the group’s territorial defeat earlier this year, while others have melted into the desert in Syria or Iraq

BEIRUT: Turkey captured the elder sister of the slain leader of the Daesh group in northwestern Syria on Monday, according to a senior Turkish official, who called the arrest an intelligence “gold mine.”
Little is known about the sister of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi. The Turkish official said the 65-year-old known as Rasmiya Awad is suspected of being affiliated with the extremist group. He did not elaborate.
Awad was captured in a raid Monday evening on a trailer container she was living in with her family near the town of Azaz in Aleppo province. The area is part of the region administered by Turkey after it carried out a military incursion to chase away Daesh militants and Kurdish fighters starting 2016. Allied Syrian groups manage the area known as the Euphrates Shield zone.
The official said the sister was with her husband, daughter-in-law and five children. The adults are being interrogated, he said, speaking on condition of anonymity in line with government protocol.
“This kind of thing is an intelligence gold mine. What she knows about (Daesh) can significantly expand our understanding of the group and help us catch more bad guys,” the official said.
Al-Baghdadi, an Iraqi from Samarra, was killed in a US raid in the nearby province of Idlib last month. The raid was a major blow to the group, which has lost territories it held in Syria and Iraq in a series of military defeats by the U.S-led coalition and Syrian and Iraqi allies.
Many Daesh members have escaped through smuggling routes to northwestern Syria in the final days of battle ahead of the group’s territorial defeat earlier this year, while others have melted into the desert in Syria or Iraq.
The reclusive leader Al-Baghdadi was known to be close to one of his brothers, known by his nom de guerre Abu Hamza.


Iran hands over Yemen embassy to Houthi militia

Updated 21 November 2019

Iran hands over Yemen embassy to Houthi militia

  • Aboul Gheit condemned Iran’s step considering it a flagrant violation

DUBAI: Iran handed over the state’s Yemen embassy to the Houthi militia which have resulted to criticisms, state news agency SPA reported on Wednesday.

The Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit condemned Iran’s step considering it a flagrant violation of diplomatic norms and of the United Nations Charter, the Vienna Convention, and the relevant Security Council resolutions - in particular Resolution 2216.

The move, he added, also reflects an Iranian insistence to destabilize Yemen’s conditions, and threaten the security of its neighbouring countries.