Iraq Pavilion at Venice Biennale shuts in solidarity with protesters

Iraq Pavilion at Venice Biennale shuts in solidarity with protesters
Updated 13 November 2019

Iraq Pavilion at Venice Biennale shuts in solidarity with protesters

Iraq Pavilion at Venice Biennale shuts in solidarity with protesters
  • In a show of solidarity with anti-government protestors, the Iraq Pavilion at the Venice Biennale has shut down
  • Initially set to run until Nov. 24, the exhibition entitled “Fatherland” was closed on Nov. 5.

DUBAI: Iraq is currently in the midst of ongoing anti-government protests that have claimed the lives of more than 260 Iraqis since they erupted earlier this month. In a show of solidarity, the Iraq Pavilion at the Venice Biennale has shut down.

Initially set to run until Nov. 24, the exhibition entitled “Fatherland” was closed on Nov. 5.

“Fatherland” is a collection of expressionist paintings by Iraqi-Kurdish artist Serwan Baran that were commissioned by Baghdad-based non-profit organization the Ruya Foundation, which in an official statement shared that the move was to show support to “the popular youth uprisings that have erupted in Iraq against state corruption and deteriorating economic and living conditions.”

“We condemn the use of violence against peaceful protesting, and the bloodshed that has led to the death of over 265 protesters so far,” read the statement shared on the organization’s Twitter account. “Peaceful protesting is a basic right, enshrined in Article 38.c of the Iraqi Constitution.”

“Since our founding in late 2012, we have worked hard, frequently in inhospitable circumstances, to create a platform for artists across Iraq to freely express their creativity, in a firm belief that culture is an integral component of any society, and a powerful force for change towards an open and free country. This is particularly important for Iraq, given its difficult recent history and authoritarian past,” it continued.

The Baghdad-based foundation, which was co-founded by Tamara Chalabi, daughter of former Iraqi politician Ahmed Chalabi, has overseen the Iraq Pavilion in Venice since 2013.


James Bond movie ‘No Time to Die’ delayed again amid pandemic

James Bond movie ‘No Time to Die’ delayed again amid pandemic
Updated 22 January 2021

James Bond movie ‘No Time to Die’ delayed again amid pandemic

James Bond movie ‘No Time to Die’ delayed again amid pandemic

LOS ANGELES: The global release of the James Bond movie “No Time to Die” was postponed to October from April, its producers said on Thursday, another setback for movie theaters trying to rebuild a business crushed by the coronavirus pandemic.

The movie’s new debut date is Oct. 8, according to an announcement on the James Bond website and Twitter feed.

“No Time to Die,” from MGM and Comcast Corp’s Universal Pictures, had originally been set to hit the big screen in April 2020 before moving to November 2020 and then April 2021.

The film, which cost an estimated $200 million to produce, marks actor Daniel Craig’s last outing as agent 007.

Cinema owners were hoping “No Time to Die” would kick off a rebound in moviegoing.

The pandemic devastated the film business in 2020, and ticket sales in the United States and Canada sunk 80%. That hurt independent theaters and big chains including AMC Entertainment, Cineworld Plc and Cinemark Holdings Inc.

With the virus still rampant in many areas, including in the key Los Angeles market, Hollywood studios appear reluctant to send their biggest films to theaters. Many cinemas are closed, and ones that are open enforce strict attendance limits to allow for social distancing.

The Bond franchise is one of the movie world's most lucrative, with 2015’s “Spectre” raking in $880 million at the box office worldwide, while “Skyfall” in 2012 grossed more than $1 billion globally.

The next closely watched movie is “Black Widow” from Walt Disney Co’s Marvel Studios, currently scheduled to debut in theaters on May 7.