What We Are Reading Today: Perspective and Projective Geometry

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Updated 21 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Perspective and Projective Geometry

AUTHORS: Annalisa Crannell, Marc Frantz, and Fumiko Futamura

Through a unique approach combining art and mathematics, Perspective and Projective Geometry introduces students to the ways that projective geometry applies to perspective art. Geometry, like mathematics as a whole, offers a useful and meaningful lens for understanding the visual world. 

Exploring pencil-and-paper drawings, photographs, Renaissance paintings, and GeoGebra constructions, this textbook equips students with the geometric tools for projecting a three-dimensional scene onto two dimensions, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Organized as a series of exercise modules, this book teaches students through hands-on inquiry and participation. Each lesson begins with a visual puzzle that can be investigated through geometry, followed by exercises that reinforce new concepts and hone students’ analytical abilities. An electronic instructor’s manual available to teachers contains sample syllabi and advice, including suggestions for pacing and grading rubrics for art projects.


What We Are Reading Today: Journalists between Hitler and Adenauer

Updated 03 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Journalists between Hitler and Adenauer

Author: Volker R. Berghahn

Journalists between Hitler and Adenauer takes an in-depth look at German journalism from the late Weimar period through the postwar decades. Illuminating the roles played by journalists in the media metropolis of Hamburg, Volker Berghahn focuses on the lives and work of three remarkable individuals: Marion Countess Dönhoff, distinguished editor of Die Zeit; Paul Sethe, “the grand old man of West German journalism” and Hans Zehrer, editor in chief of Die Welt.
All born before 1914, Dönhoff, Sethe, and Zehrer witnessed the Weimar Republic’s end and opposed Hitler. When the latter seized power in 1933, they were, like their fellow Germans, confronted with the difficult choice of entering exile, becoming part of the active resistance, or joining the Nazi Party.
 Instead, they followed a fourth path—“inner emigration”—psychologically distancing themselves from the regime, their writing falling into a gray zone between grudging collaboration and active resistance. During the war, Dönhoff and Sethe had links to the 1944 conspiracy to kill Hitler, while Zehrer remained out of sight on a North Sea island. In the decades after 1945, all three became major figures in the West German media. Berghahn considers how these journalists and those who chose inner emigration interpreted Germany’s horrific past and how they helped to morally and politically shape the reconstruction of the country.