What We Are Reading Today: Perspective and Projective Geometry

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Updated 21 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Perspective and Projective Geometry

AUTHORS: Annalisa Crannell, Marc Frantz, and Fumiko Futamura

Through a unique approach combining art and mathematics, Perspective and Projective Geometry introduces students to the ways that projective geometry applies to perspective art. Geometry, like mathematics as a whole, offers a useful and meaningful lens for understanding the visual world. 

Exploring pencil-and-paper drawings, photographs, Renaissance paintings, and GeoGebra constructions, this textbook equips students with the geometric tools for projecting a three-dimensional scene onto two dimensions, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Organized as a series of exercise modules, this book teaches students through hands-on inquiry and participation. Each lesson begins with a visual puzzle that can be investigated through geometry, followed by exercises that reinforce new concepts and hone students’ analytical abilities. An electronic instructor’s manual available to teachers contains sample syllabi and advice, including suggestions for pacing and grading rubrics for art projects.


What We Are Reading Today: A Place for Everything by Judith Flanders

Updated 23 October 2020

What We Are Reading Today: A Place for Everything by Judith Flanders

A Place for Everything fascinatingly lays out the gradual triumph of alphabetical order, from its possible earliest days as a sorting tool to its current decline in prominence in our digital age of Wikipedia and Google.
Historian Judith Flanders draws readers’ attention to both the neglected ubiquity of the alphabet and the long, complex history of its rise to prominence.
A Place for Everything presents the study and analysis made by the author of the alphabet’s origins and its development as a sorting tool.
“This book will be very interesting to a narrow audience of people — particularly librarians,” said a review in goodreads.com.
Deirdre Mask said in a review for The New York Times for The New York Times that Flanders, a meticulous scholar who has written books on Victorian London and the history of Christmas, “prioritizes thoroughness, and at times her book can read a bit like the encyclopedias she writes about. The footnotes get some of the best lines.”
Mask is the author of The Address Book: What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth,
and Power.