What We Are Reading Today: Opt Art by Robert Bosch

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Updated 22 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Opt Art by Robert Bosch

  • Opt Art takes readers on an entertaining tour of linear optimization

Linear optimization is a powerful modeling method for discovering the best solution to a problem among a set of available alternatives. 

It is one of today’s most important branches of mathematics and computer science — and also a surprisingly rich medium for creating breathtaking works of art. 

Opt Art takes readers on an entertaining tour of linear optimization and its applications, showing along the way how it can be used to design visual art, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.

Robert Bosch provides a lively and accessible introduction to the geometric, algebraic, and algorithmic foundations of optimization. He presents classical applications, such as the legendary Traveling Salesman Problem, and shows how to adapt them to make optimization art—opt art. 

Each chapter in this marvelously illustrated book begins with a problem or puzzle and demonstrates how the solution can be derived using a host of artistic methods and media, including 3D printing, laser cutting, and computer-controlled machining.


What We Are Reading Today: Hosts and Guests by Nate Klug

Updated 23 September 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Hosts and Guests by Nate Klug

Nate Klug has been hailed by the Threepenny Review as a poet who is “an original in Eliot’s sense of the word.” 

In Hosts and Guests, his exciting second collection, Klug revels in slippery roles and shifting environments. The poems move from a San Francisco tech bar and a band of Pokémon Go players to the Shakers and St. Augustine, as they explore the push-pull between community and solitude, and past and present. 

Hosts and Guests gathers an impressive range: Critiques of the “immiserated quiet” of modern life, love poems and poems of new fatherhood, and studies of a restless, nimble faith. At a time when the meanings of hospitality and estrangement have assumed a new urgency, Klug takes up these themes in chiseled, musical lines that blend close observation of the natural world, social commentary, and spiritual questioning. 

As Booklist has observed of his work, “The visual is rendered sonically, so perfectly one wants to involve the rest of the senses, to speak the lines, to taste the syllables.”