35 Turkish soldiers sent to Libya so far, but won’t see combat: Erdogan

The 35 soldiers were carrying out training and coordination tasks for Libya’s UN-recognized Government of National Accord (GNA) based in Tripoli. (File/AFP)
Short Url
Updated 08 January 2020

35 Turkish soldiers sent to Libya so far, but won’t see combat: Erdogan

  • Erdogan said the soldiers are carrying training and coordination tasks for GNA
  • Libya has been mired in chaos since a 2011 NATO-backed uprising killed Qaddafi

ANKARA: Turkey has deployed 35 military personnel to Libya but they will not take part in any fighting, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said, according to local media on Wednesday.
“The soldiers will not fight. Other soldiers who will be deployed later will also not enter any combat,” Erdogan told his ruling party, according to the Hurriyet daily.
He said the soldiers were carrying out training and coordination tasks for Libya’s UN-recognized Government of National Accord (GNA) based in Tripoli.
The comments were made during a high-level, closed-door meeting of the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) on Monday, Hurriyet reported.
Turkey’s parliament last week approved a military deployment to support the Tripoli government against an assault by military strongman Khalifa Haftar.
Libya has been mired in chaos since a 2011 NATO-backed uprising killed longtime leader Muammar Qaddafi.


UN hosts Muslim World League conference on protecting youth from extremism

Updated 28 min 50 sec ago

UN hosts Muslim World League conference on protecting youth from extremism

  • MPs, parliament speakers, UN ambassadors, an elite of religious and ideological leaders in attendance

GENEVA: Muslim World League (MWL) Secretary-General Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa launched the initiatives of “youth protection from extremist and violent ideas and implementation mechanisms” during an international conference organized at the UN headquarters in Geneva.

MPs, parliament speakers, UN ambassadors, an elite of religious and ideological leaders and academics specialized in the topics of conference were in attendance.

Al-Issa said the initiatives aim at protecting the youth from violent and extremist ideologies or those inciting violence, and shed light on the responsibility of educational institutions in this context.

This would be achieved, he said, through the establishment of school curricula with “interactive activities” that focus on discussing the differences, diversity and pluralism in our world. 

They also aim to reaffirm that religious, ethnic and ideological clashes are a danger to world peace.

Al-Issa stressed the need to filter speeches targeting the youth from all that incites conflicts, hatred, racism and enmity, with the principle of human equality and understanding and respecting natural differences and diversity as an important foundation for countries and societies’ peace and harmony. 

He also noted the importance of spreading tolerance and rejecting the disadvantages of hate, racism and marginalization.

He said: “It is important to ban the exportation or importation of fatwas and religious ideas, for the religious awareness is flexible, and takes into consideration the changes of fatwas and religious sermons in line with the time, place and circumstances,” adding that extremism is not acceptable in any circumstance.

Egypt’s Minister of Endowments Dr. Mohammed Mokhtar Jomaa stressed during the conference that terrorism has become more dangerous than today’s diseases, as it has become easier to spread than any virus.  

“Individuals, countries and organizations must all work together on a purely humanitarian ground, for there is no development, prosperity, advancement or economy without security, and no security with terrorism and no terrorism eradication without protecting the youth from extremism,” he said.