Syrian singer Faia Younan to perform with John Legend in Dubai

Syrian singer Faia Younan is set to perform alongside US superstar John Legend at his concert in Dubai. (File/AFP)
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Updated 26 January 2020

Syrian singer Faia Younan to perform with John Legend in Dubai

DUBAI: Syrian singer Faia Younan is set to perform alongside US superstar John Legend at his concert in Dubai’s Coca-Cola Arena on Jan. 31.

“Friends in Dubai and UAE, I cannot wait until we meet and sing together,” the crooner wrote on Instagram, sharing the exciting news with her 1.1 million followers.

The 27-year-old, who now splits her time between Lebanon and Sweden, first rose to fame after her single “To Our Countries” became a viral sensation. She went on to release her debut single “Ohebbou Yadayka” and feature on electro-pop group Gorillaz’s 2016 album “Humanz.”

Meanwhile, Legend is to perform in the UAE as part of the Dubai Shopping Festival’s closing celebrations.

The 41-year-old artist will take to the stage at Dubai’s Coca-Cola Arena for what will be his second appearance in the city.

Legend headlined the 16th Emirates Airline Dubai Jazz Festival in 2018, playing alongside singing star Ricky Martin and British pop band Duran Duran.

The start of Dubai Shopping Festival was marked with two outdoor concerts in Burj Park, which saw performances from British crooners Liam Payne and Jorja Smith, Algerian musician Cheb Khaled and Emirati singer Hussain Al-Jassmi.


Helping children cope with anxiety during the coronavirus pandemic

Parents are now reaching out to psychologists to learn how to deal with this new dynamic. (Shutterstock)
Updated 31 March 2020

Helping children cope with anxiety during the coronavirus pandemic

  • Psychologists share tips to help parents deal with their children’s emotional and behavioral issues that emerged amid the coronavirus pandemic

DHAHRAN: Amid the constantly-evolving coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, children – just as much as adults – are grappling to understand what is happening around them. 

Sarah Rasmi, psychologist and director of Thrive Wellbeing Centre, a Dubai-based counselling center that specializes in helping children with emotional and behavioral issues, told Arab News that parents are reaching out to learn how to deal with this new dynamic. “Parents are feeling anxious because of uncertainty in their children’s academic life and in navigating home learning,” she said. “Children are not meeting their friends, are learning remotely and are missing major milestones, like birthdays and graduation ceremonies.”

While some children might have the language and ability to name their emotion and reach out for help, many may not understand or articulate what they are going through. According to Rasmi, one of the first signs that a child might be experiencing anxiety is impaired sleep (particularly if it is in contrast to their regular sleep patterns). “For young children, look for regressive behavior like thumb sucking and clinginess. For older children and adolescents, anxiety is manifested through aggressiveness, agitation and poor concentration,” she says.

While some children might have the language and ability to name their emotion and reach out for help, many may not understand or articulate what they are going through. (Shutterstock)

Vassiliki Simoglou, a counselling psychologist at the center explains that frequent meltdowns and tantrums are another signal in younger children, while older children might withdraw and isolate themselves.

“The quality of communication with our children is of paramount importance in helping them and us navigate through these difficult times,” Simoglou said. She advises using age-appropriate language to have open communication on: Sharing what they have seen or heard, addressing any misinformation, and discussing preventive measures. One example might be to discuss the importance of social distancing and check in with them about their emotions. 

“Embracing their emotional reactions and naming them can help our children come to terms with these changes and help us deepen our connection with them,” Simoglou explained. It is also important to practice patience, tolerance and reassurance during these conversations. “This way they can feel safe in their inner world, no matter how unsafe the external world might seem right now.”

Letting children determine the activity and its sequence gives them a voice and say in their day-to-day routine. (Shutterstock)

To create a safe and predictable environment, the psychologists also recommend having a routine at home. For example, a set of printable-cards that lists activities a family performs during the day — brushing teeth, creating art and craft, praying, etc. Letting children determine the activity and its sequence gives them a voice and say in their day-to-day routine. 

The Thrive Wellbeing Centre team has created a children’s comic book that teaches children how to acknowledge the changes happening in their lives, identify anxiety, reach out to somebody and what they can do to get help. The Centrealso  has several free resources and webinars — ranging from anxiety management strategies during crises to the empowerment of children in times of adversity — on their website.