Need something to watch? Saudi Arabia’s ‘Masameer the Movie’ hits Netflix

Netflix is streaming the Myrkott-produced film with subtitles in more than 30 languages. (Supplied)
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Updated 02 April 2020

Need something to watch? Saudi Arabia’s ‘Masameer the Movie’ hits Netflix

DUBAI: Netflix is now streaming Saudi animation film “Masameer the Movie,” which is based on an animated YouTube series, co-created by Faisal Al-Amer and Malik Nejer, that is considered one of the most successful local cartoon mini-series to date. 

Netflix is streaming the Myrkott-produced film with subtitles in more than 30 languages, making it available to more than 167 million viewers in 190 countries around the world.

The animation tells the story of Dana, a Saudi girl with a passion for robots and artificial intelligence, who embarks on a journey to create good in the world using robotics.




The film is based on an animated YouTube series. (Supplied)

Meanwhile, three friends: Saad, Saltooh and Kalb hit rock bottom and go on a journey of their own to prove themselves to society by becoming crime-fighting superheroes.

“We as Saudis, tell a story, our story, and as filmmakers or creators don’t need to sugar-coat or create a flowery image of our society,” Al-Amer told Arab News in a previous interview. “This is us, we don’t create movies for the approval of the West, we make them to express ourselves.”

Netflix’s decision to stream the film comes after “Six Windows in the Desert,” a series of short films created by Saudis made its debut on the streaming giant in February.


Australian-Lebanese model Jessica Kahwaty urges fans to help Lebanon

Updated 3 min 19 sec ago

Australian-Lebanese model Jessica Kahwaty urges fans to help Lebanon

DUBAI: Model and philanthropist Jessica Kahawaty has taken to social media to raise awareness about Lebanon’s deepening economic crisis amid the coronavirus pandemic. 

According to reports, the economic crisis coupled with the health pandemic can lead to a famine in the Levant country. 

Kahawaty, who is part Lebanese and part Australian, took to her Instagram Stories to explain the seriousness of Lebanon’s worsening economic crisis and hyperinflation. 

“For non-Lebanese to understand the severity of what’s happening in Lebanon: $100 used to give you 150,000 Lebanese Liras,” she wrote. “Due to the deteriorating state of the country, $100 gives you 900,000 Lebanese Liras. If you’re living and working in Lebanon and your salary a year ago was 4.5 million Liras per month, today that salary is worth $450. Severe inflation is reflecting an increase in prices in the supermarkets,” she added, before urging her followers to donate to different organizations helping on the ground in Lebanon. 

“If you know of more organizations, please DM me so I can share,” she wrote alongside links to several Lebanese NGO’s and charities that provide assistance to Lebanese families struggling to put food on the table.

The 31-year-old also shared a past shoot, which was orchestrated by a team of Lebanese photographers, stylists and makeup artists . “It pains me that this shoot was done by one of the most talented teams of Lebanese creatives, whose dreams are being shattered day-by-day along with the rest of the country due to the careless behavior of the leaders,” she captioned the black-and-white shot.

“Lebanon is known to produce such incredible talent especially in the fashion industry. It devastated me knowing that as soon as they somewhat had their feet on the ground, something close to what our parents experienced may happen again. From hyperinflation to the imminent risk of a civil war, once again the country and people are taken back many steps and many generations.” 

A few celebrities and figures have stepped in to offer their assistance to Lebanon amid its unprecedented economic crisis, including Hollywood power couple George and Amal Clooney who donated $300,000 to the Lebanese Food Bank in April.