Crying US COVID-19 nurse video slamming poor working conditions slated as ‘fraudulent’

A viral video of a nurse which suggested she had to quit her job due to inadequate protection while treating coronavirus patients has been called “fraudulent.” (Screenshot/CBS)
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Updated 07 April 2020

Crying US COVID-19 nurse video slamming poor working conditions slated as ‘fraudulent’

LONDON: A viral video of a nurse which suggested she had to quit her job due to inadequate protection while treating coronavirus patients has been called “fraudulent.”
CBS News tweeted the video on April 5 with the caption: “In tears, a nurse says she quit her job after she was asked to work in a coronavirus ICU without a face mask.”

The video was also shared by US presidential hopeful Senator Bernie Sanders.

The clip, posted on the nurse’s Instagram page on March 31, shows her crying shortly after she said she had quit her position at an unnamed hospital in the Chicago area because she had been assigned to a COVID-19 patient and was not allowed to wear her N95 mask outside of the unit.
“I quit my job today,” the woman who uses the social media handle Imaris said. “I went into work and I was assigned to a COVID patient on an ICU unit that has been converted to a designated COVID unit. None of the nurses are wearing masks, not even surgical masks, in the hallways when they’re giving reports to each other.
“Nurses are not being protected,” she said.
“I had my own N95 mask. I told my manager, ‘I understand we’re short on supplies, but let me protect myself. Let me feel safe’,” she added.
However, Jordan Schachtel, the national security correspondent for Conservative Review, started a thread on Twitter on Monday questioned the veracity of the video’s claims and called the nurse a “fraud.”
He said the nurse began to backtrack on her story soon after Sanders shared the video.

Health care workers in the unit were actually assigned a N95 mask per one patient’s room, the nurse clarified in a tweet to the senator, which was not included in the video shared by CBS News.

“We were each assigned 1 N95 per 1 COVID patient’s room but was not allowed to wear it outside of the room, wear our own N95 mask around the Nurses station or Halls, which I came prepared with,” a tweet appearing to be from the same nurse reads.
Schachtel said the nurse had said she was “not allowed” to wear masks around anyone, even COVID patients.
“Bottom line: Hospital did have adequate supply of PPE & masks & was taking proper precautions, while making prudent decision not to blow through supplies. She shows up, 1st day on job, wants to break protocol & do her own thing. They say no. She quits & goes full crisis actor,” he tweeted.

He added that the nurse failed to disclose her career history after finding Facebook and Twitter posts from March 26 from a woman who appears to match the nurse in the video, which claim she had been off work for two weeks and would be returning to work in four days, indicating she left her position on her first day back on the job.
Schatchel pointed out the woman was also attempting to become an Instagram model.

“So she had been on the job for a day or two, after taking a year off to pursue something resembling an Instagram model career, and she ‘quit’ because of the conditions. Deliberate misrepresentation of her career means you cannot take her other statements at face value,” Schachtel said.

The nurse admitted in a post written a day before her first day back at work that she suffered from anxiety and bi-polar depression and noted that she was “feeling a heavy toll” by going to work in the ICU after a break from nursing.


Hit play: Sports content takes on new life on social media

Updated 26 October 2020

Hit play: Sports content takes on new life on social media

  • Sport — along with related topics like fitness and health — is one of the top three categories on TikTok right now

DUBAI: Whether you are playing or watching, sports are best enjoyed in person. But with social distancing measures in place since earlier this year, like many other activities, sports have gone virtual.

In May, when ESPN aired the final two episodes of its Michael Jordan docuseries “The Last Dance,” 20 of the 30 trending topics on Twitter were related to it. That night saw more than 1.5 million tweets about the final episode, bringing the total volume of tweets about the series above 11 million. Even before the pandemic, in 2019, 22 percent of consumers were seeking sports content on social media — up 47 percent from just 2016.

In fact, sport — along with related topics like fitness and health — is one of the top three categories on TikTok right now. “In the last couple of months, we have built a concentrated community that started allowing us to engage with different pillars of fitness and health,” said Rami Zeidan, head of video and creative at TikTok. These pillars include everything from fitness motivation and health, lifestyle and workout tips to stunts and street performances, such as parkour and freestyle football.

A 2020 study in Saudi Arabia found that 73 percent of people on Twitter are football fans, with 85 percent of them using Twitter to follow along while watching a game on TV. The respondents also said that they use Twitter to follow the official accounts of players (27 percent), to check out the latest video clips (38 percent) and to view pre-match news and post-match analysis (28 percent). The football fandom on the platform is evidenced by the 91 million tweets related to the 2019-20 Saudi Professional League (SPL) season just this month.

According to recent research by Twitter, football is the most popular sport on the platform in Saudi Arabia. In fact, the SPL season was marked by a three-day Twitter campaign that was launched on Oct. 19 under the hashtag روح_الدوري# (“The League’s Spirit”). The first day of the campaign saw Twitter’s account in the Middle East invite comedians to share their takes on the best SPL commentary moments. These were shared through voice tweets, which add a more human dimension to conversations and which allowed the comedians to incorporate their own personal style in the commentary. Although the feature is currently being tested on iOS devices, everyone on Twitter is able to hear voice tweets and reply to them.

FASTFACTS

Sport and Social Media

- 73% of Twitter users are football fans.

- Sports is one of the top three content categories on TikTok.

- 520% more Instagram Live videos were produced from March-July 2020, compared to 2019.

The focus for the second day of the campaign was Video Assistant Referee (VAR) technology. The comedians created their own VAR moments through humorous video content shared on the platform, which illustrated real-life scenarios in which VAR could come in handy — for example, to settle a challenge between friends or to find out who really spilled the popcorn. “Fans have always turned to Twitter to be part of the action in real time. We’re seeing the passion and energy of the football stadium now surging online. Twitter is where fans, players, experts and leagues weigh in with a range of viewpoints. With humor being a key element of Twitter conversation in Saudi, the روح_الدوري# campaign brought levity to a much-anticipated event in the Kingdom,” said Kinda Ibrahim, director of media partnerships, Middle East and North Africa, Twitter.

More than 170 million people follow fitness-related accounts (e.g. weightlifting, cycling, yoga, etc.) on Facebook, and more than 120 million people follow similar accounts on Instagram. Based on an index of Facebook and Instagram’s top fitness partners, 75 percent more Facebook Live videos were produced during the months of March through July in 2020 as compared to 2019, while 520 percent more Instagram Live videos were produced during the same months as compared to 2019. These numbers have resulted in the company capitalizing on the rise of sports and fitness content by building a team to focus on fitness, introducing products to help fitness businesses build an audience and generate revenue, and planning a Fitness Summit, where Facebook will share the latest product tips and best practices with fitness organizations. 

Even for fans that consume sports content on more traditional media like TV, social media platforms are almost always a part of the experience as a second screen. For instance, Snapchatters in the US send Snaps and Chats to their inner circle (29 percent), watch friends’ Stories (28 percent), post their own Stories (20 percent) and check out Discover highlights and shows (26 percent) while watching sports. Moreover, approximately 30 percent want sports leagues to use Snap to go behind the scenes, share news and player interviews, and tap into augmented reality (AR) that recreates the sporting venues they cannot visit.

The Middle East and North Africa region is among the most socially active and engaged regions, as well as one that loves consuming sports content. Social media plays a huge role, whether it is for clubs like Al-Ahli, celebrities like Mo Salah or independent social media fitness star Walid Yari. And with 26 to 33 percent of people in Saudi Arabia, the UAE, South Africa and Egypt saying that they use social media to follow sports news and events, it is time for brands to start paying attention. The sports industry is already realizing the power of social media, but advancements in technologies such as AR, accelerated by post-pandemic digitization, present new opportunities for growth.