Celebrities, influencers make face masks a fashion statement 

Despite the decline in fashion sales, a number of brands have united for a good cause. (Instagram)
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Updated 21 May 2020

Celebrities, influencers make face masks a fashion statement 

DUBAI: Since the coronavirus was classified as a global pandemic in March by the World Health Organization, the fashion industry has been struggling due to a decline in sales as a result of the global lockdown.

Lockdowns and travel restrictions have wreaked havoc on the usually jam-packed fashion calendar, with the cancellation of major events, including Paris and Milan Fashion Weeks.

While people stay at home and self-isolate, some have found ways to bring their old fashion pieces back to life and recycle old looks with a modern flair.

British-Egyptian fashion influencer Dina Tokio has been “digging up lots of old clothes.” 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fun fact.. This tracksuit didn’t fit two years ago. Digging up lots of old clothes whilst stuck at home recently

A post shared by Dina (@dinatokio) on

As a result of declining sales, several brands have been forced to shut down, including luxury e-tailer The Modist.

Despite the decline in fashion sales, a number of brands have united for a good cause. 

Fashion houses such as Moroccan brand Karim Adduchi and Egyptian brand Rigash by designer Lamia Rady have been producing face masks to generate revenue to donate to frontline workers and people affected by the pandemic.

Celebrities and fashion influencers are also supporting these brands by pushing their products to the public. 

From Part-Palestinian model Bella Hadid to Jordanian-Romanian footwear designer Amina Muaddi, stars have made the compulsory face shield a fashion statement with their stylish touches. 

Below are some creative looks by celebrities with the face masks.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by Dana Al Tuwarish ‏ᴰᵀ (@daneeda_t) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Felt like putting on a summer dress at home today. #butmakeitquarantine

A post shared by Dana Hourani (@danahourani) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

off to buy dishwasher tablets brb

A post shared by DUA LIPA (@dualipa) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

We finally re-Planted our 1500 lavender babies Proud

A post shared by Bella (@bellahadid) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Eyes are never quiet. #FirstDayOutIn2Months Thanks for the masks @avoyermagyan

A post shared by Priyanka Chopra Jonas (@priyankachopra) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by elsa hosk (@hoskelsa) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

A post shared by MonaLisa (@mona_tougaard) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Smiling cus IT’S MY FAULT drops in 2 days! (Smile not included)

A post shared by Lolo Zouaï (@lolozouai) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Social distancing but make it fashion. Thank you @lesuperbecalifornia for the prettiest mask / blouse set!

A post shared by Cindy Crawford (@cindycrawford) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Q hacéis? Yo voy al super a x cuatro cosas

A post shared by LA ROSALÍA (@rosalia.vt) on

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Yara (@yara) on


AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

Updated 02 June 2020

AlUla cultural and heritage site to reopen in October

  • Historic destination in northwest of Kingdom will now be accessible to visitors all year round

JEDDAH: When you’re already a quarter-of-a-million years old, a few months out of action because of a coronavirus pandemic is no more than a blip in time.

It is therefore safe to say that when visitors return to AlUla, the culture and heritage destination in northwest Saudi Arabia, not a lot will have changed.

AlUla’s attractions, including the Kingdom’s first UNESCO world heritage site, will reopen in October — and they will now be accessible all year round.

Walks, treks and trails will be available, guided by the local Rawi (Arabic storyteller) or self-guided, for visitors who want to delve deeper into the stories and customs of the region.

A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks.

“We are developing immersive, light-touch experiences that harness the power and silence of the landscapes, experiences like guided stargazing in a desert night sky that has inspired science, religion, philosophy, art and literature for millennia,” said Phillip Jones of the Royal Commission for AlUla.

Adventure tourists can tear around in a desert buggy or take to the skies in a vintage light aircraft to see volcanic craters and the lava fields of Harrat Khaybar. 

For families, Hijrat Noura, or Princess Noura Farm, offers a chance to observe the local flora and fauna. Winter Park, developed for the Winter at Tantora festival, will also return.

“A visit to AlUla is a transformative experience to all who have visited — its vast open spaces, its secrets of civilizations gone by and the pure wonder of its landmarks,” Jones said.