Erdogan vs. Putin in battle over fake news

(AFP)
Short Url
Updated 27 May 2020

Erdogan vs. Putin in battle over fake news

  • Relations between the two countries are becoming increasingly strained

ANKARA: Relations between Turkey and Russia have reached a new low with Ankara’s launch of a Russian-language TV channel and social media account to fight “fake news” from Moscow.

The official aim of the new digital platform is “battling disinformation and manipulation.”

Turkey’s state-run TRT broadcaster, which already has English, Arabic and German channels, said it would work through local correspondents in the Russian-speaking world to give “alternative narratives.”

“Like many Western countries, Turkey has been a target of intense Russian disinformation campaigns,” Dr. Emre Ersen, an expert on Turkey-Russia relations from Marmara University in Istanbul, told Arab News.

“So  the launch of TRT Russian could definitely be viewed as a countermeasure against such campaigns by Russia now that the divergence of interests between the two countries over Syria and Libya is becoming more and more visible.”

Relations between the two countries are becoming increasingly strained. The shooting down of a Russian fighter jet by Turkish forces in November 2015 sparked a fierce information war between their media outlets.

In March, Turkish police briefly detained the editor in chief of Russia’s Sputnik Turkey news agency, and employees’ homes were attacked by mobs who called them “Russian spies.” Russia’s Foreign Ministry condemned the episode as a “flagrant violation of the rights of journalists.”

Last year, the Turkish EDAM think-tank published a study suggesting that Russian sources had published tens of thousands of fake news stories about the downing of the Russian jet, Russia’s annexation of Crimea and talks about Russia’s S-400 missile system.

“Even before the downing of the Russian jet, Turkish media were suspicious of Russia,” said Dr. Akin Unver, an associate professor of international relations at Kadir Has University in Istanbul. “Its annexation of Crimea, and military deployment in Syria were all viewed with suspicion. After the shooting down of the jet, there was a seven-month media war between Russia and Turkey, and Russia won the war of narratives.”


Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan

Updated 28 November 2020

Frankly Speaking: Arab News premieres first talkshow with former PM of Pakistan

  • Hosted by veteran journalist Frank Kane, program will interview movers and shakers, world policymakers
  • Each episode of the program is 20 minutes, with occasional additional reporting and interviews to be included throughout

LONDON: Arab News, the region’s leading English-language Middle East newspaper, is proud to announce its latest video product: “Frankly Speaking,” a recorded show that will interview and challenge movers and shakers, world policymakers and influential deciders on topics relating to the Arab world.

Hosted by veteran, award-winning journalist and senior Arab News business columnist, Frank Kane, who has interviewed influential business leaders and key politicians from around the world including Emirati tycoon, Khalaf Al-Habtoor, president of the World Economic Forum (WEF), Borge Brende, and Anthony Scaramucci, the former communications adviser to US President Donald Trump.

Each episode of the program is 20 minutes, with occasional additional reporting and interviews to be included throughout.

 

 

“Frankly Speaking” will be available on Arab New’s YouTube channel and on the program page on the Arab News website.

Commenting on the launch, Arab News Editor in Chief Faisal J. Abbas said: “As the leading English language news source on Saudi Arabia and Middle East, it was only natural for Arab News to expand its video offering and we are very proud to present 'Frankly Speaking' as our first product for our followers worldwide.”

“While editorial integrity can only be proven, the combination of the credibility of both the Arab News brand and the long experience and interview style of Frank Kane will ensure that each episode provides an intellectually stimulating debate and plenty of material for further discussion,” he said.

 

 

The first episode of “Frankly Speaking” launches on Saturday at 5 p.m. Riyadh time (2 p.m. GMT) and will feature former Pakistani Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz, who will talk about his own recipe for change in Pakistan, Saudi Arabia’s reforms, the difference between Islamabad’s relationship with Iran and with Saudi Arabia, as well as his views on Israel.