Bollywood star Aishwarya Bachchan moved to coronavirus ward

Aishwarya Bachchan was a former beauty queen who went on to become one of India’s top actors. (AFP file photo)
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Updated 18 July 2020

Bollywood star Aishwarya Bachchan moved to coronavirus ward

  • India has now recorded more than one million coronavirus cases
  • Aishwarya Bachchan won the Miss World Crown in 1994

MUMBAI: Bollywood star and former Miss World Aishwarya Rai Bachchan has been moved to a Mumbai hospital along with her eight-year-old daughter, nearly a week after they were revealed to have the coronavirus, media reports said.
Her actor husband Abhishek Bachchan and superstar father-in-law Amitabh Bachchan are already in the same hospital, the highest-profile personalities to have been infected in India, which has now recorded more than one million cases in the pandemic.
Aishwarya Bachchan, a former beauty queen who went on to become one of India’s top actors, and her daughter Aaradhya were revealed on Sunday to be suffering from the coronavirus.
They had been in self-quarantine at home but the Times of India newspaper said they were moved to the Nanavati Hospital on Friday after complaining of “breathlessness.”
“They are fine,” a hospital source told Press Trust of India news agency.
Amitabh Bachchan, 77, and his son Abhishek, 44, are in the hospital’s isolation ward. When they entered hospital their cases were described as “mild.”
No health update has been given since but Amitabh has been regularly issuing Twitter messages.
“In happy times, in times of illness, you our near and dear, our well-wishers, our fans have ever given us unstinting love,” he said Friday.
Aishwarya Bachchan won the Miss World Crown in 1994 and has since become one of the most famous faces in Bollywood. She has been a regular on the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival and married Abhishek Bachchan in 2007.
The elder Bachchan, idolized in India and affectionately known as “Big B” — has a more than four-decade-long career in the film industry.
He was voted “actor of the millennium” in a BBC online poll in 1999 and became the first Indian actor to gain a lookalike at London’s Madame Tussauds waxworks museum.
City authorities said India’s financial and film capital has now seen nearly 100,000 cases, with more than 1,200 new patients being reported each day. More than 5,582 people in the city have died.
Nationally, the country of 1.3 billion people has reported 26,000 dead.


REVIEW: It’s a tough, brutal world in ‘The Devil All the Time’

Updated 31 min 35 sec ago

REVIEW: It’s a tough, brutal world in ‘The Devil All the Time’

  • Tom Holland leads an all-star cast in Netflix’s gritty post-war thriller

LONDON: The star-studded cast of “The Devil All the Time” promises big things. Tom Holland and Sebastian Stan (both mainstays of the Marvel cinematic universe), Bill Skarsgård (fresh from traumatizing a new generation in the “It” movie remakes), Jason Clarke (“First Man” and “Pet Sematary”) and new Batman Robert Pattinson all signed on for this Netflix thriller, directed and co-written by Antonio Campos, one of the filmmakers involved in the recent COVID-era anthology “Homemade.”

“The Devil All the Time” follows a disparate group of characters in post-war Ohio and West Virginia. (Supplied)

Based on the novel by Donald Ray Pollock, who takes a turn as the movie’s narrator, “The Devil All the Time” follows a disparate group of characters in post-war Ohio and West Virginia. Returning soldier Willard Russell (Skarsgård ) believes he’s left the war behind him when he meets waitress Charlotte (Haley Bennett). The two have a son, Arvin. But despite these positive overtones, Campos’ world is one of ever-present menace, with corrupt officials, twisted lovers and charlatan preachers behind seemingly every corner, waiting to sully any glimmer of optimism with depravity.

Adult Arvin (played with surprising grit and gravitas by Holland, better known for his bright-and-breezy Spider-Man) struggles to cope with the brutality of the world as it batters him at every turn. When vile preacher Preston Teagardin (Pattinson) rolls into town, his sinister intentions are telegraphed from the get go and, unsurprisingly, his predatory nature kickstarts a chain of events that lifts the lid on the darkest possible side of 1960s USA.

Holland is a joy to watch, his dramatic heft belying his young age. Pattinson is, quite simply, horrifically intoxicating, throwing himself into the role with all the sneering vileness he can muster. The two Brits steal the lion’s share of the limelight, but Campos’ film benefits from the high-caliber ensemble. Simply by pointing a camera at them, the director is onto a winner.

The movie doesn’t shy away from violence, and some scenes are a little tough to take. And it’s an unrelenting second half as Holland’s world comes tumbling down in relatively short order. “The Devil Al the Time” is a brutal, visceral experience. But great performances from a stellar cast make it an engaging one.